Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
11 Posts

Fury of Dracula (second edition)» Forums » General

Subject: Movie Recommendation for Newbie 13 year old (to FOD) rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Lin Parkh
United States
Unspecified
Unspecified
flag msg tools
Hi,
Picked up Fury of Dracula for my family. I have a 13 year old boy. He has never seen a Dracula movie and I want him to see one to give him context for the game (Fury of Dracula). What movie would folks recommend that would be most relevant to the game while not being too violent (PG) and of course hopefully a decent movie so enthusiastic about game. I am fine with old or now movies.
THanks for any guidance!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pelein de Cratia
Spain
Guayota City
Nivaria
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Dracula/Coppola and the book of Bran Stoker.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Fritz Mulnar
Germany
Bremen
not Bavaria
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
"not too violent"
"Coppola"
not counting the seas of blood, impaling medieval style and sex sex sex!


perhaps the old lugosi, very toned down. it is not the original story.

but even then, its more sinister. dont know. ask your child, what he likes most.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Waterzero
Spain
Alcorcón
Madrid
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
My selection in this orden:

-Dracula (1992 Coppola version)
-Nosferatu (1972 Werner Herzog version and 1922 Murnau version)
-Dracula (1931. Black & White. Vela Lugosi)

But for a children is a special question. Be carefull...

Edit: I recomend too "Interview with a vampire" (Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt). A great vampire atmosphere. And for the child "Van Helsing" (Hugh Jackman).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jim Smith
United Kingdom
Sheffield
South Yorkshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
Please don't show the Coppola version to your kid yet - it is far from suitable at that age.

The difficulty with Dracula is that the subject matter lends itself more to adult films, but if I were to select a version it must be Terence Fisher's 1958 film featuring Christopher Lee. It's age means the gore is toned down compared to modern standards, but the story is largely intact and it's very good.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darrell Pavitt
United Kingdom
Unspecified
Unspecified
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The Christopher Lee version was recently down-graded from an "18" rating to a "12-A" rating. Just shows how things have changed.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darrell Pavitt
United Kingdom
Unspecified
Unspecified
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The Louis Jourdan version was pretty faithful to the book:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075882/
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lin Parkh
United States
Unspecified
Unspecified
flag msg tools
Thank you'all.
I will look into Christopher Lee and Louis Jordan.. just to be on the safe side of 13 :-)
THanks,
Lin
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Batt
United States
Scottsdale
Arizona
flag msg tools
badge
Rebel
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992 Coppola) is one of my favorite movies of all time, but I would NOT show it to a 13 year old, mainly because of the sex scenes, which includes a vampire orgy scene.

The older Dracula movies are fine, but I think a 13 year old would enjoy a movie like Van Helsing a bit more than the older ones, and I think Van Helsing is perfectly appropriate for a 13 year old.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bill Barber
United States
New Rochelle
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Monster Squad!!! Introduces Dracula and all his wily ways, but is intended to be watched by 13 year olds. And a great Goonies-lite flick
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
The Mad Hatter
United States
Burbank
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm a bit late to this discussion, but couldn't help tossing in a few cents...

The Hammer version was like gold when I was ten years old. I remember being so impressed with it. Peter Cushing! Christopher Lee! Technicolor! Sadly it did not hold up eight years later when I saw it again; "the smoothest and most deceitful of liars is memory," as Harlan Ellison once wrote.

Sadly, the Lugosi version, apart from capturing his performance (as well as Dwight Frye as Renfield and Edward Van Sloan as Van Helsing), is very lacking. Director Tod Browning had done some of his best work by that point in his career (though his magnum opus "Freaks" would be made a few years after this), and this one is very static and stagey and "still." There's little innovative camerawork; in fact, the director of photography was so frustrated by shooting this the way Browning wanted it, he would just turn on the camera and walk away. I guess he struggled with inner demons and drink through a lot of his life, and I get the sense that they might have been winning when he made the Lugosi version...

I do like the Coppola version, even though it's waaaay over the top in some places, which is partly where they were going with it. This version is one where I hate the romance aspect they tacked on - James V. Hart's addition of the whole reincarnated wife thing is a bit belaboured and unneccessary. Each time I see it, I think, "why do they need to add this dopey, gooey, high-school musical style love story to it all? Why can't Dracula just be hungry?" I don't think a kid would be too scared by it, though the sexuality is a bit overt in places (the three vampire brides aren't exactly hags, and they're pretty scantily clad while they're crawling all over dumb Keanu Reeves). But nothing you wouldn't see in a music video nowadays...

The Louis Jordan one was finally released on DVD about a year or so ago, and while it fiddles a bit with the plot (and really, which Dracula movie doesn't mess with the plot?) it's pretty good for something made and aired in the 1970's on PBS. Though it is a bit odd for it to jump from video for some interiors, and then to film for exteriors. Frank Finlay is good as Van Helsing, also.

A personal favorite, which is dripping with mood, is the John Badham version with Frank Langella which was also released in the late 1970's. His take on Dracula is more seductive lover in the image of Lord Byron, but it works more convincingly than the Coppola one. There are some great creepy moments, and for something that is based partly on the awful Balderston/Deane play, the script is fairly decent. Sir Laurence Olivier is Van Helsing in that one, and Donald "Halloween" Pleasence is Dr. Seward. The score by John Williams is one of my favorites, lush and orchestral and atmospheric; it might even make a good background music choice while playing the game...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.