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Subject: RGB Color Cards rss

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Mike Haverty
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Sorry for cross-posting this, but I think the folks in this forum are my primary users (if any). I have made a set of RGB color cards to help me pick colors when making/printing game components. I'm colorblind and non-artistic; mix that with the way colors look differently on my laptop, my desktop, my printer, Artscow, etc. and I frequently end up with colors not looking the way I want.

SO, to save myself some headache, I created a set of 12 color palette cards, including their RGB values (because I use RGB with JPG, PNG and nanDeck). I am printing these on my local printer as well as ordering a set from Artscow (2x of each card, for comparing easier), so I will know what my colors will look like, in advance.

Hope this helps other folks like me. Thanks for looking, and feedback welcome.

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/filepage/47453
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Gary Simpson

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Thanks Mike!

When dealing with print shops, most will convert the RGB palette to a CYMK palette (also seen two shops use LAB for hi-rez art prints). The color gamut is slightly different between the palettes, meaning that some alterations/blends should be expected.

Another source of frustration for color purity is that Mac computers have a differing Gamma base than PC based computers (its not much -- a 1.1 instead of a 1) but can cause some colors to become darker printed than projected on the computer monitor.

One last tidbit of info -- monitors do not show colors 100% accurately to how we see them. In a real world setting, color is light reflected off an object. Monitors can emulate this but at best its just a projection. You will not know a color till you test print it out.
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Lee Smith

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I did a similar thing, using X11 web colors:
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/filepage/47615

These cards work really well when you want to match a color or are trying to make something a slightly different hue.
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Philip Migas
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I can’t figure out how you use these cards.
1. Do you only select from these colors for a game?
2. Do you use all of the colors from one card? Or do you select one color from each?
3. Do you see each of these colors as distinctively different?
4. Which one of the three types of color blind do you have?
5. Do you only use these colors or do you modify them slightly?
6. Do you have someone check your color combinations after using these cards? IMO Some of these colors are not great.

I have found this link to be some handy color blind information, See: http://jfly.iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp/color/
 
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Mike Haverty
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SawHat wrote:
I did a similar thing, using X11 web colors:
http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v1/4DHBSuxwajogz4BYsM6wLVTxbSiIGSr...

These cards work really well when you want to match a color or are trying to make something a slightly different hue.


Cool, but that link doesn't seem to work for me?

pmigas wrote:
I can’t figure out how you use these cards.
1. Do you only select from these colors for a game?
2. Do you use all of the colors from one card? Or do you select one color from each?
3. Do you see each of these colors as distinctively different?
4. Which one of the three types of color blind do you have?
5. Do you only use these colors or do you modify them slightly?
6. Do you have someone check your color combinations after using these cards? IMO Some of these colors are not great.

I have found this link to be some handy color blind information, See: http://jfly.iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp/color/


These aren't meant to show coordinated colors, per se. They are just a set of colors with RGB codes that I (anyone) can use to pick from when choosing colors for a printed game component. As an example, I am working on rummy card games for a contest and I like to put a color band on the edge of the card, similar to the Mystery Rummy games. I have anywhere from 10 to 14 suits in different games, so it's really hard for me to pick that many distinct colors, and even harder if I want to coordinate them (such as showing that 2 suits are related to each other). With these cards, I can hold them next to each other when choosing colors to make sure I can tell them apart.

I would definitely have someone with good color vision do a sanity-check on anything before I printed it "for real" (self-publish or submitting to a publisher). Fortunately, I'm the only one in my design group with this handicap so it usually gets worked out during playtesting iterations.
 
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Mike Haverty
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I've updated the file entry with a PDF version of the 12 cards -- much easier to just print them out now, if doing it on your own printer.
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Lee Smith

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I didn't realize the link above wouldn't work for everyone. I've updated it to point to a BGG entry:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/filepage/47615
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This Guy
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You can get a wider gamut when printing by choosing a printer who uses Pantone's Hexachrome printing process. In addition to standard CMYK, Hexachrome adds orange and green inks. Supposedly, you can get closer to RGB colors than with CMYK, and the vibrant nature of the orange and green inks can make other colors really jump off the paper.
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