Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

Ad Astra» Forums » Rules

Subject: Terraformers rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Seth Jaffee
United States
Tucson
Arizona
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We thought perhaps we had a rule wrong when we were taught the game. Terraformers cost Food and Water, and they can only be built on planets that provide Food and Water. This creates something of a feedback loop wherein I can seek out Food and Water planets, set up colonies (maybe factories) on them, produce a lot of Food and Water, and then just plop down TerraFormers on the planets I already have control of.

Sure, this means I'm not continuing to compete for 'most colonies' or 'most spaceships' - but Terraformers are really good points themselves.

Thematically this didn't make sense either - the Food and Water planets already have food and water, you'd want to Terraform OTHER planets to make them livable. Mechanically, this would force you to get Food and Water (through planets or trade), then also get a different planet on which to build the Terraformer, a little more work, and a little less brainless a task.

I checked the online rules, and it turns out we did NOT have the rule wrong. Terraformers create their own little feedback loop. And it's not as if Food and Water are terrible otherwise... you need them both to colonize planets.

Weird. What's up with that?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Danielson
United States
Mountlake Terrace
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have found its not always easy to get enough food and water planets to build 3+ terraformers. Usually someone can, but its not always you... The combo requires you to play your score cards so you can 'double play' terraformers, find enough food and water planets, and build terraformers usually at the cost of increasing production. Its clearly awesome when it works but I've found it not always 'in the cards' when your trying to make it happen.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Lacombe
Louisiana
msg tools
badge
Suddenly a shot rang out! A door slammed. The maid screamed. Suddenly a pirate ship appeared on the horizon! While millions of people were starving, the king lived in luxury. Meanwhile, on a small farm in Kansas, a boy was growing up.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
sedjtroll wrote:
Thematically this didn't make sense either - the Food and Water planets already have food and water, you'd want to Terraform OTHER planets to make them livable. Mechanically, this would force you to get Food and Water (through planets or trade), then also get a different planet on which to build the Terraformer, a little more work, and a little less brainless a task.


Those are actually really good arguments.

When we have a dozen games or so under our belt, we might try swapping the terraforming placement rules.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Hoffman
United States
Cortlandt Manor
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow, I was not aware you could only teraform worlds that produce food or water. I've played this twice after being taught you can teraform anywhere.

That takes the wind out of one guy's "I'm'a terraform the shit out of this galaxy" strategy somewhat. Wow.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chuck Parrott
United States
Wilmington
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I don't think it is anti-thematic. In this case terra forming is taking a planet that is livable but barely and improving the conditions to make it more ideal and sustain larger populations. We're talking temperate/water belts of stars. The other mineral rich planets can't be terra formed because of too hot/cold or no viable amounts of basic elements to begin forming a water/oxygen based ecology. They get self enclosed mining colonies instead.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Lacombe
Louisiana
msg tools
badge
Suddenly a shot rang out! A door slammed. The maid screamed. Suddenly a pirate ship appeared on the horizon! While millions of people were starving, the king lived in luxury. Meanwhile, on a small farm in Kansas, a boy was growing up.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
cparrott wrote:
I don't think it is anti-thematic. In this case terra forming is taking a planet that is livable but barely and improving the conditions to make it more ideal and sustain larger populations. We're talking temperate/water belts of stars. The other mineral rich planets can't be terra formed because of too hot/cold or no viable amounts of basic elements to begin forming a water/oxygen based ecology. They get self enclosed mining colonies instead.


Putting it so scientifically sure does take the steam out the typical sci-fi "I'm going to turn this molten space hell of a planet into an aquatic paradise" terraforming shtick. shake
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chuck Parrott
United States
Wilmington
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Well I guess there's always the Genesis probes...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Lacombe
Louisiana
msg tools
badge
Suddenly a shot rang out! A door slammed. The maid screamed. Suddenly a pirate ship appeared on the horizon! While millions of people were starving, the king lived in luxury. Meanwhile, on a small farm in Kansas, a boy was growing up.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
cparrott wrote:
Well I guess there's always the Genesis probes...


YES.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin Lester
msg tools
NateStraight wrote:
cparrott wrote:
Well I guess there's always the Genesis probes...


YES.


Sounds like there's an alien card missing. Oreious Surpriseia (my latin is about as good as JK Rowling). Terraform any ore planet.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.