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PQ-17: Arctic Naval Operations 1941-1943» Forums » General

Subject: List of sources & further reading rss

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Jan Vater
Germany
Cologne
NRW
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I recently acquired a couple of books that appear on the list of sources in the play book and would like to thank Chris for putting the list together. The books by Woodman and Kemp really are a good read and help a lot to get in the right mood for some PQ-17 action. Very much recommended and, as always, appreciation to the game designer for a piece of work thoroughly thought through. Really looking forward to the next title in the Decision at Sea series.

Having access to german sources, i'm wondering why the 'Golden Comb' attack manoeuvre is named like it is, for the German term 'Zange' does actually translate as 'pliers' or 'pincers'? Can anyone share some light on this?

Additional reading i found quite likeable and helpful:

'Sea Eagles' Vol. I + II by Chris Goss (Ian Allan Pub.)
- excellent photographs, personal accounts -
'Luftwaffe Bomber Aces' by Mike Spick (Greenhill Books)
- good introductory reading, focussing on tactics -
'The Sea Eagles: The Luftwaffe's Maritime Operations' by Peter Charles Smith (Greenhill Books)
- valuable general overview, good read -
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Chris Janiec
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Thank you for sharing the additional sources, Jan. The list in the Play Book is not complete, but these are not works I've consulted. I'll have to find a copy of Smith's The Sea Eagles, as it may add something to the Med game.

Quote:
Having access to german sources, i'm wondering why the 'Golden Comb' attack manoeuvre is named like it is, for the German term 'Zange' does actually translate as 'pliers' or 'pincers'? Can anyone share some light on this?

Yes, "comb" would be better rendered as "Kamm" in German. I can only think that, for once, something was gained in translation rather than lost, as the tactic used -- a full Gruppe of bombers deployed in line abreast -- is better described as a "comb" rather than "tongs."

However, there may be allusion involved here that escapes English speakers. I've found two references to a "goldene Zange" in German which may apply. "Die Goldene Zange" was a 17th century house occupied by a branch of the Rothschilds, that ultimately burned. If renderings are to be believed, it was what we would call a row house with a succession of pointed roof peaks; this resembles the row of aircraft. The second is a legend of a blacksmith who receives a pair of golden tongs for shoeing the devil's horse. Everything the tongs touch turns to gold, placing the blacksmith in the same position as King Midas, with pretty much the same fate.

Perhaps one of our German readers can tell us more?
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