Recommend
11 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Power Grid: Factory Manager» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Mistakes I made in my first game rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Norbert Chan
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Wow, so this is what you get for 100 pieces of gold.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Greg had received this as a Christmas present, so we brought this out after lunch.

Quick overview of the game:

Each player is a factory manager, attempting to generate the most money. Money is earned each turn by the minimum of the boxes or crates they have in their factory. Players acquire these tiles as shown in Figure 1.





Figure 1. An example of a tile to put into your factory. (Photo courtesy of Kerstin Jakob (LucyJo)).

The bottom left hand number is the cost of the tile (It costs $11 Elektros). The top left hand corner is the number of boxes that it generates, the middle top shows the number of workers you need to keep occupied to keep this tile, and the top right hand corner shows how much energy in Elektros needed to keep this tile running. Note that no tiles in this game have both boxes and crates on them. The tile in Figure 1 is a machine, and 1 machine can support 1 robot.

Everyone gets a player mat as shown in Figure 2.


Figure 2. Player mat in factory manager. (Photo courtesy of KAS (kneumann))

We can observe a few things from Figure 2. This player is earning $110 Elektros, since they have 11 boxes and 13 crates. This player has 3 machines, and 3 robots (denoted by a round blue symbol on the bottom right hand corner). There is exactly one space for an optimization tile (the $39 cost tile in this case on the fourth floor)) and exactly one space for a control tile (the $12 cost tile on the third floor). Below the control floor are factory spaces marked with $10 E. When a player expands into these spaces, they must pay an extra $10 Elektros. Covered up by the workers in Figure 2 is the girlie poster in the canteen. Such a poster in my workplace would allow the offender to be promptly marched to human resources, never to be heard from again.

The energy the player is consuming is 2 Electros, found by adding all the top right hand values. This is marked on the chimney stack.

There are also shut down gray markers in the game, which can be used to shut down robots or machines. These can be used if the player has more robots than machines or the player wishes to conserve the number of workers.

Each player starts with 7 workers. In addition, players may buy a maximum of two seasonal workers for $7 Elektro each for each turn. Seasonal workers are distinguished by the one different hand, as shown in Figure 3. Presumably, seasonal workers fish during the summer, and work in the factory during the winter.


Figure 3. Seasonal workers. (Photo courtesy of Andre E (andre1975))

Using your workers, one bids for turn order. Remaining workers are used to buy tiles or tear down existing tiles in your factory. An example of a bid tile is shown in Figure 4. Tiles range from 1 to 12. The higher tile means you buy tiles last, which is a disadvantage, but the higher tiles have a discount for each purchase, in this case -$4 Elektros for each tile and seasonal worker.


Figure 4. The "11" bid tile. (Photo courtesy of Roberta Moschini (RobyNico05))

Tiles available for purchase are brought down from the storage board as shown in Figure 5. In player order starting with the lowest bid tile, each player brings down a number of tiles equal to their remaining workers.



Figure 5. The storage mat with all the tiles available to be bought. (Photo courtesy of Richard Voorintholt (rivo))

Notice that the more efficient buildings are higher up on the storage mat. A higher cost building cannot be brought down for purchase until all the lower cost buildings below it have been brought down. Finally, in player bid tile order, players buy the tiles, maximum one per free worker.

Income is then calculated, and subtracted from that is the energy cost. For instance, if the energy marker on Figure 5 is the 4 space, then one's cost is four times the energy value on their chimney stack. Energy increases by a value of 0 to 2 each turn.

Players: Trevor, Don, Greg, Jean and Norbert. We were playing the first game where the new energy price would go up by 0 on the first turn.

In our game, I was going fourth. I decided on the first turn to buy an optimization shown in Figure 6:


Figure 6. Optimization unit that I bought. (Photo courtesy of Kerstin Jakob (LucyJo))

I believe this was a mistake, since I was no longer motivated to buy a better optimiztion such as those that cost 30. I got an income of 20 or so, but Don built cheap inefficient machines and got an income of around 30.

On the second turn, I compounded my problem by buying a 20 cost control. I was the only one with the cheapest control and optimization, but in this beginner game, where the energy price expands by 0 on turn 2, one has lots of time to prepare for the energy increase by purchasing high value optimization and control.

I peaked around turn 3, getting around 80 income. But as the energy prices increased, I was not motivated to replace my optimization or control. I ended up with a low bid tile and bought both seasonal workers, but I forgot to use one to rip up an inefficient one crate tile, and left it unused. That was poor planning on my part.

On the last turn, everyone was short of boxes, and Jean going first, did not put any box tiles down. The rest of us promptly flooded the market with boxes and everyone got their fill of boxes. Don, who started out the most inefficient, was a well oiled machine now.

Scores: Don 307, Greg 288. Trevor 287, Norbert 266, Jean 256.

I certainly would like to play again to see if I can improve. A summary of my mistakes are as follows:

1. I bought two cheap optimization and control tiles in turns 1 and 2. I should have built up my infrastructure then bought the heavy duty optimzation and control tiles later in the game.

2. I left a worker unused once, when I should have used the worker to rip up an inefficient crate tile to make room for better crate tiles.

It's an interesting game. Looking forward to more plays, when it will play quicker and see if I can improve from my initial score.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Duff
Canada
Ottawa
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Norbert Chan wrote:
The energy the player is consuming is 2 Electros, found by adding all the top right hand values. This is marked on the chimney stack.


Actually it's 1 Electro, as the photo shows. 5 machines using 1 energy, less 3 for the optimizing tile, less 1 for the control tile.

The 10 machine that is shut down does not add to the energy costs, which is why it's 1, not 2.

Nice report.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lou Moratti
United States
Kalamazoo
Michigan
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for this session review. I have this game on order and have been trying to make sense of the online rules without much success. This has helped some, though I am still murky as to some of the terms you used and matching a bit of what you describe to the pictures provided.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Hoffman
United States
Vienna
Virginia
flag msg tools
Yes, shrubberies are my trade. I am a shrubber. My name is Roger the Shrubber. I arrange, design, and sell shrubberies.
badge
Oh, what sad times are these when passing ruffians can say Ni at will to old ladies. There is a pestilence upon this land; nothing is sacred. Even those who arrange & design shrubberies are under considerable economic stress in this period in history
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I also purchased an optimization and control in the first two turns of my first game (due to the other players buying up all of the worthwhile machines) and regretted it. Neither system was ever replaced.

Managing turn order (and screwing the players that purchase systems last) seems to be a major, major element of this game.

Good report!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.