Recommend
50 
 Thumb up
 Hide
15 Posts

The Republic of Rome» Forums » Sessions

Subject: That fire sure is pretty- where's my fiddle? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Grant Johnson
United States
Cedar Park
Texas
flag msg tools
Well me known for eating cookie when me don't they shout
badge
Look! He try to throw loyal fans a curve!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This is a fresh session report off our latest Republic of Rome play. We've been recruiting for more in Austin and finally got in a game with 5. The players were Grant (tallgrant), Cory (Koryo), Dick (tvdinner), Andy (rayrayxl3) and Laurie (leban). Andy was a first timer. Cory had a single play earlier this month. Dick, Laurie and myself each had two plays. We played Early Republic. Removing the rules explanation, setup and dinner the game ran about 5 hours.

This report will run in 2 sections- the first is a chronicling of the game events as it played out in a story format. Then I'll go back and review what happened in game terms and how the strategies/politicking had influence the game.

Setup
The factions were initially set as follows:
Andy: Claudius, Papirius, and Manlius
Laurie: Terentius, Plautius and Aemilius
Grant: Aurelius, Quinctius and Julius
Cory: Calpurnicus, Valerius and Fulvius
Dick: Fabius, Aelius and Acilius

Papirius was the outgoing Rome Consul to begin.

Turn I

The Republic opened with the appearance of Hamilcar, which activated the First Punic War. An Evil Omen appeared as a black cat stepped in front of Mars' temple and coughed a hairball onto the altar. Because there was no Pontifex Maximus the state had to foot the bill for carpet and altar cleaning. The Second Macedonian War also appeared on this turn. Antiochus III emerged but as Syria was not prepared for war he died of natural causes after a life as a horticulturist.

In the Senate phase, Fabius (Dick) and Julius (Grant) were unanimously made consuls. Fabius was the Rome Consul. He nominated Calpurnicus (Cory) to serve as Pontifex Maximus, because he held the Aegyptian Grain concession and could earn money to protect against future evil Omens. Calpurnicus (Cory) awarded a priesthood to Plautius (Laurie). Papirius (Andy) was made Censor. For the benefit of the Republic no Senators were prosecuted for corruption.

Rome raised 10 fleets, and then an additional 4 fleets to ensure success. This resulted in 42 talents being award to Quinctius (Grant) for the ship building concessions. Quinctius (Grant) promised that this money would be returned to Rome. Julius (Grant) was sent to fight a naval battle with Carthage with 14 fleets (vs. a strength of 10 +3 for Hamilcar). Julius (Grant) had numerical superiority and a good strategy to win the battle, but the Carthaginians hit a lucky stalemate. 4 fleets were instead lost and the battle went unresolved.

Turn II
Fabius (Dick) passed away after hearing news of the stalemate in Africa. Cornelius appeared and joined Andy's faction. Philip the V appeared in Macedonia, ready to command the war. A New Alliance also became apparent during the Forum Phase. A poor speech given by the Censor Papirius (Andy) led to an increase in the unrest level by 3 and a Manpower Shortage. Quinctius (Grant) kept his word and donated 25 talents to the Roman treasury, and spent an additional 18 talents on a Gladiator Gala.

In the Senate Phase, Cornelius (Andy) and Aemilius (Laurie) were made consuls. Rome Consul Cornelius (Andy) immediately moved that Aelius (Dick) be made Dictator. Aelius (Dick) was unanimously elected and selected Quinctius (Grant) as Master of Horse. Terentius (Laurie) was awarded a priesthood. As the only eligible candidate in Rome, Papirius (Andy) was elected Censor for a second term.

Julius (Grant) was recalled along with the ten remaining fleets. Based on input from Papirius (Andy), Aelius (Dick) passed a proposal awarding the Cognomen "Custer" to Julius (Grant). This prescient award was in honor of the previous stalemate in the First Punic Naval battle. Four additional fleets were raised. Dictator Aelius (Dick) then sailed to Carthage with 14 fleets and his Master of Horse Quinctius (Grant). The New Alliance banished the Second Macedonian War.

Dictator Aelius (Dick) had an identical battle performance to Julis Custer (Grant)- better numbers, decent leadership and another impossible situation for Carthage. A second stalemate occurred at Carthage and four more fleets were lost.

Turn III
Julius Custer (Grant) passed away from an unhappy suicide. His losses in the First Punic War and humiliating surname shamed him greatly, and he could no longer bear the unpopularity. Following his death the Second Macedonian War reappeared. The Trial of Verres occurred (which was strange as Rome had no provinces) and Fabius II joined Andy's faction. Sulpicius joined Laurie's faction.

The new consuls nominated were Fulvius (Dick) and Sulpicius (Laurie)- Grant's faction was firmly against the proposal but was outvoted 36-7 . Fulvius (Dick) was made Rome consul and also appointed as a priest. Aemilius (Laurie) was elected Censor but continued a tradition of no prosections. Aelius (Dick) and Quinctius (Grant) were recalled. 15 legions were built. Rome sent 19 legions and 5 fleets with Sulpicius (Laurie) to the Second Macedonian War, where despite the numbers and leadership, divine intervention saved Rome's enemies again as a disaster occurred. 3 fleets and 10 legions were lost.

Hope appeared on the horizon as the leader of the Cornelius (Andy) family emerged and named himself P. Cornelius Scipio Africanus.

Turn IV
Five crucial events occurred this turn. There was a manpower shortage. Another black cat entered Mars' temple and soiled the rugs. This Evil Omen cost Pontifex Maximus Calpurnicus (Cory) 20 talents for carpet cleaning services. A storm at sea destroyed the 8 fleets in Rome. Allied Enthusiasm that promised additional talents for the treasury in the near future. And rumors began to spread that a new nation would offer Refuge to leaders who opposed Rome. The poor state of the Republic speech given by Fulvius (Dick) led to a greater manpower shortage.

To face the many crises the newly elected consuls were Quinctius (Grant) and Acilius (Dick). It was obvious that because of the storm losses and the manpower shortage, Rome would not be able to build the required fleets to fight either war. Quinctius (Grant) had campaigned hard to sit in the Rome Consul office- due to his fleet building concessions he had thrown many games and was sitting pretty high in the popularity. The hope was that Quinctius (Grant) would better quell the public opinion during the upcoming State of the Republic speech. Valerius (Cory) was awarded a priesthood.

Aelius (Dick) was made Censor and decided to prosecute. He began a trial for Papirius (Andy), at which point an assassin appeared and tried to kill the Censor. The assassination was bungled. Faction leader Manlius (Andy) was immediately implicated and placed on trial. Manlius (Andy) defended himself against the prosecuting Calpurnicus (Cory)- he lost 4 votes in his popular appeal but made them up with arguments during the trial. The vote was then called- Manlius (Andy) was found guilty 34-15 and executed.

The trial then resumed for Papirius (Andy). Valerius (Cory) was named prosecutor and Scipio Africanus (Andy) led the defense. The arguments in the trial generated 16 innocent votes and Papirius (Andy) was acquitted 54-19.

Quinctius (Grant) and Aelius (Dick) proposed that a Type I land bill be passed to placate the people. This passed unanimously. It was clear very quickly that both benefited as Quinctius (Grant) received a bump in popularity and Aelius (Dick) immediately received a land bill concession. Cato the Elder (Cory) and Q. Fabius Maximus (Andy) both appeared in Rome.

Turn V
Terentius (Laurie) passed away this turn- Laurie's faction had grown to an unprecedented four Senators and Terentius, fearing the evil it could portend, gave up the ghost. Furius joined Dick's faction. There was also panic in Rome as the Second Punic, First Macedonian and Second Illyrian War all appeared. With the two existing wars this meant that one must be defeated this turn and another the following turn, or Rome would fall. Rome had to take desperate measures to survive desperate times. Many of the Senators threw games and the unrest level was reduced from 7 to 1. Quinctius (Grant) used his high popularity to give a speech for the ages and the unrest in the city disappeared completely.

Cato the Elder (Cory) and Scipio Africanus (Andy) were made consuls, with the thought that Scipio Africanus would be leading an army as a Field Consul. It was then proposed that Q. Fabius Maximus (Andy) be made Dictator- he was summarily appointed. Julius (Grant) was selected as Master of Horse. Fulvius (Cory) won an election Censor by a vote of 31-14 (Andy and Laurie's factions both voted against it). The discussion then turned to war strategy- Rome absolutely needed to win one war this turn, and it was decided that the best thing to do was concentrate all resources on the Second Macedonian War to make sure it was cleared before the matching First came into play. Rome built 7 Legions and 7 Fleets with 2 fleets intended for the Illyrian war the following turn- the previous manpower shortages had spooked the Senate. Q. Fabius Maximus (Andy) and Quinctius (Grant) were sent to the First Macedonian War. A great victory with no losses occurred and Macedonia was defeated.

Turn VI
Following in the path of the dead Terentius, Aemilius (Laurie) also gave into the will of Hades and passed away. Rome was facing 4 active wars (the Two Punic, Second Illyrian and First Macedonian) and had the troubles worsen by the appearance of the First Gallic War. The First Illyrian War became imminent as well (where Philip V was being harbored), and the screws tightened on Rome. Manlius II joined Grant's faction, only to perish in an Epidemic that also claimed Q. Fabius Maximus (Andy), Plautius (Laurie) and Calpurnicus (Cory). A Storm at sea occurred and all but three fleets were lost.

Furius (Dick) was elected as Rome Consul, with Fulvius (Cory) made Field Consul. The Senate worried that too much influence was being vested in Andy's faction, so the young Senator Aemilius II (Laurie) was
instead made Dictator with Julius II (Grant) as Master of Horse. Cato the Elder (Cory) was named the new Pontifex Maximus. Claudius (A) was nominated as Censor but was vetoed by Cato (Cory). Instead Aelius (Dick) was made Censor. Three concessions lost in the epidemic were awarded, with Cato (Cory) receiving Aegyptian Grain and both Claudius (Andy) and Furius (Dick) receiving tax farmers. Fulvius (Cory) was dispatched to the 2nd Illyrian War with 2 fleets and 8 Legions. Dictator Aemilius II (Laurie) then took 17 legions into Gaul and the Senate adjourned.

Both wars were astounding victories with no losses. Gallia Cisalpania was created as a province. Paullus Macedonius (Laurie) and T. Quinctius Flaminius (Grant) also emerged.

Turn VII
Rome fell subject to a drought. In the confusion Furius left Dick's faction and instead joined Andy. Rome had an ally desert, which increased the difficulty in one of the upcoming wars. Rome again had 4 active wars and would need to win one to save the Republic. Manlius III was persuaded to follow in his father's footsteps and join Grant's faction, while Terentius II joined Dick's faction. Hamilcar sensed a weakness in Rome and to further instill fear in the masses his son Hannibal began operations as well.

Manlius III (Grant) was elected Rome consul, with Sulpicius (Laurie) as Field Consul. Acilius (Dick) was nominated for Censor but was vetoed by a rousing speech by Cato the Elder (Cory). Aemilius Paullus Macedonius (Laurie) was then nominated but vetoed again by Cato (Cory) using his office as Pontifex Maximus. Furius (Andy) was then nominated and shot down by Cato (Cory) using a Tribune. Papirius (Andy) was brought to a vote and failed 33-31. Quinctius Flaminius (Grant) was then voted down 47-16. Aelius (Dick) was then elected by a vote of 48-15.

Aurelius (Grant) was nominated as governor of Cisalpina Gallia and narrowly avoided the appointment with a late tribune. Terentius II (Dick) was nominated and tribuned, as was Acilius (Dick). Valerius (Cory) was ultimately made governor.

Sulpicius (Laurie) was sent out to the First Illyrian War with 3 fleets and 25 Legions. The was was a great success for Rome. P. Popillius Linnaes joined Andy's faction.

Turn VIII
Julius II passed away from the shock of the Illyrian victory and the knowledge that Rome was no longer under immediate threat of collapse. This signified the end of the Early Republic as it had weathered the storms. The Senators began a grab for power. Fulvius (Cory) used Seduction and paid a large sum to persuade Popillius Linnaes (Andy) to change factions but his arguments fell on deaf ears. Aelius (Dick) blackmailed Papirius (Andy) to change factions, only to see Scipio Africanus (Andy) persuade Papirius (Dick) to return. Fulvius (Cory) made a final attempt to woo Popillius Linnaes (Andy) away but the large amount of talents in the faction coffers made Linnaes stay put.

Andy finished with the most influential faction in Rome with 49, followed by Cory (44), Dick (37), Grant (32) and Laurie (22).

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
All in all it was a pretty exciting game. We had just about everything happen, though I can shed some light on the strategy and the way things played out.

Turn I
This was our first Evil Omen (the prior 2 games we didn't see any). We had to suck it up and pay out of the treasury.

Early on we decided that the first turn we'd raise as many fleets as we could to win the naval battle, and then follow up with the legions afterward. We had to check the rules to see that Hamilcar also increased the naval strength of the First Punic War, so we had 4 additional fleets built. There was some concern that the fleet concession was putting too much money in my hands (Cory voted against the 4 fleets after we'd built 10)- I promised that it would all go back to Rome.

At the battle we rolled a 14. This would normally have been a resounding win but instead was a stand-off number.

Turn II
The manpower shortage really hurt here, as we wanted to make sure we won in Carthage before things got out of hand. So we all kicked some money into the treasury to pay the bills, named a Dictator and raised 4 fleets to replace what we lost. Andy decided it would be funny to chastise me for the military failure. In our first Republic of Rome game I did the same to Dick in a very similar situation. And strangely it all played out the same as that game.

Dick rolled into Carthage and threw another 14. Again a stalemate, and 4 fleets lost. Things started looking bad, but we'd been fortunate to only draw one war so far.

Turn III
We knew things were getting bad with the Punic Wars, and we were put off by the fact that 5 different good die rolls would sabotage us. We decided that the 2nd Macedonian gave us a better shot- even with Philip V there were only 3 bad numbers to roll and no naval battle. Andy also made it known that Scipio was coming to fight Carthage, so there'd be some later hope. We went out to war and threw an unlucky 13, having a disaster cost us half the troops. Afterward things got worse.

Turn IV
We had 5 events this turn- it was unreal. We realized that with the manpower shortage, the lack of money and the high unrest we were in serious trouble. We couldn't afford to build anything. Dick decided he wanted to prosecute Andy because his Senators had held so many offices and he was climbing in influence. We did make a mistake- Papirius had a major office marker left over from his being Censor on turn 2. Dick announced a major prosecution (which in retrospect was not allowable) and the assassination attempt occurred. When we realized our mistake we elected to leave it as it was and assume a minor prosecution had sparked the debate instead. Andy was somewhat unhappy about it but Manlius wasn't a huge loss for him.

I had maneuvered Quinctius into the Rome Consulship to appease the people. He had used his fleet concessions to throw games and had a 3 popularity (and then 5 following the land bill). The unrest was as high as 7 this turn and we desperately needed to clear the manpower shortage.

Turn V
In our games, Laurie has had horrible luck with her Senators. Something about epidemics, losses in battle, or the mortality phase seems to really stick to her faction. I congratulated her when she'd reached 4 Senators in the previous turn as she'd never had more than 3- things quickly returned to normal.

Several people threw games and dropped the unrest down to 1. This kind of nullified Quinctius' importance the previous turn (he had 7 popularity and I wasn't complaining). Most everyone wanted popularity to help avoid prosecution at the hands of an enemy Censor.

A lot of our infighting was put on hold because of the large number of wars that came out- we absolutely had to win. When we reviewed our funds and the situation we realized we couldn't build enough fleets and armies to fight Carthage and we badly needed to win a war. So we decided to stick it to Macedonia with a leader who would nullify the bad rolls and took it down. There started to be concern about Andy as he had some pretty powerful statesmen.

Turn VI
We got into another must win situation- this time we needed to clear 2 wars. We divided the forces (which included one veteran legion) so that in each battle we would have 9 added to our roll and would just need to avoid disaster numbers. It was closer than we would have liked to cut it but we pulled through. Andy began getting upset that his high military senators (particularly Scipio) were not being nominated to fight- we told him that it was really risky for everyone else as they had 21 influence and would jump to nearly 30 if they defeated Carthage. We still held out hope that we'd face the Punic wars.

Turn VII
Hannibal appearing cemented the fact we'd not be fighting the Punic war. It was just not happening. so we focused on clearing out what we could. The politicking began again- there was a lot of concern over where Censor would fall and we fell to only 2 or 3 eligible candidates before someone was elected.

I also made a mistake in choosing a governor. I thought I'd send a Senator of my own to protect him from persuasion attempts, forgetting that he was in the path of Hannibal and the Second Punic War. After he was unanimously being elected I tribuned him, and instead put up a couple of Dick's Senators. When those failed I randomly picked between Andy and Cory- all of Cory's Tribunes were used in the fight for Censor and so he lost the vote.

The Refuge card moved Philip over to the Illyrian war but we mobilized 25 legions and crushed it without issue.

Turn VIII
Losing Julius took me out of contention, and Laurie had little hope with her tiny faction. Cory spent a lot of money to steal Linnaeus from Andy and rolled a 10, failing the attempt. Dick made his persuade attempt, but Andy was able to steal him back just as easily. Andy was not aware he needed money on his Senators to bid for the last forum action, and had placed a lot in his faction treasury. But as Cory couldn't outspend him he held on to win.

We did ignore the fact that Hannibal should have stomped on Cisalpinia Gaul at this point- the loss of Valerius would have cost a little influence but not enough to affect the positions we finished in.

All in all, a fantastic game. I think we're ready to try the Middle Republic- our first two tries didn't have quite so much venom during the Senate phases.

39 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
oystein eker
Norway
Unspecified
sola
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks! Great read - both sections. Good mix of chrome and facts.

Love the black cat/clean the rug stories
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jennifer Schlickbernd
United States
Santa Clarita
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
How long was your game?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Johnson
United States
Cedar Park
Texas
flag msg tools
Well me known for eating cookie when me don't they shout
badge
Look! He try to throw loyal fans a curve!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We all showed up at noon and finished the game at around 6:15. But that included about 30 minutes of rules explanation at the front end along with the setup, and a 30 minute break for dinner at around 5 PM.

I also ended up costing us about 10 minutes time by taking a work phone call (bad bad bad, I know.). So our actual gameplay was closer to the 5 hour mark.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Noakes
United Kingdom
Redhill
Surrey
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Fantastic... keep them coming! They fuel the fire while waiting for the game to reach England, and helps to hang some kind of a game off of the rulebook. It'd be nice for some kind of insight into what drives the infighting hinted at throughout your report--why some proposals are shot down or prosecutions are started....

-M.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Johnson
United States
Cedar Park
Texas
flag msg tools
Well me known for eating cookie when me don't they shout
badge
Look! He try to throw loyal fans a curve!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
That's actually fairly simple to bring up.:

Regarding infighting, there's a push for positioning throughout the game. Early Republic presses Rome pretty hard, so we've all got to work together. But you really do not want to put somebody out in the lead too far. If they get too much influence (35) they're appointed Consul for life. If they have too many votes, they can elect themselves Consul for Life (21 minimum required) or put the right people in office to get up to 35 influence. And at the End of Era you need to be sure you're in top of the influence so you want to limit what goes on.

The only real point of friction in the first 4 turns was the fleet concessions- I was making a lot of money off of them and folks were worried that I'd have a huge advantage. I coughed a lot of it up and put it back into the state- it really didn't help. Next time I'm squirrelling more away for a secret slush fund.

Around turn 5 people started to get worried about Andy. He had 2 big statesmen with nice oratory numbers, and they were both hanging around 20 influence. Scipio Africanus in particular was a problem- if he fought Carthage and won he'd get a influence prestige bonus and popularity. That would make him hard to prosecute (minor prosecutions cost influence, but your popularity rating helps your defense) and put him close to the magic 35 required to win. All of Andy's Senators except Manlius had held major offices (including Dictatorships) so they were really high in influence compared to the rest of us.

The fight over Censor in turn 6 was something similar- nobody wanted to be prosecuted, or to let a rival faction get the additional 5 influence from holding the office. So different nominees were shot down- Cory didn't like Andy having the office, Andy, Laurie and I didn't want to see Cory in it, and nobody wanted me to have it. Dick seemed non-threatening but the first time he was nominated he was shot down as well. I think the general preference would have been to let Laurie have it, but her only eligible Senator was already Dictator.

Beyond that, the other concern is punishing the factions who are your enemies. I think the general alliance structure of the game put Cory/Dick together against myself and Andy. It wasn't that strictly held- I voted against Andy when I thought there was too much power gathering (such as when Manlius was executed), and I stood up for him when I thought it would benefit me (not long after I helped acquit Papirius he traded a nice statesman to me). And there were times that I supported giving offices to Dick and Cory. At the end I think they both were targeting Andy because he was #1 in influence, and they both thought he had the easiest Senators to steal. I had a 9 influence Senator that Cory could have easily taken and moved up in the world- for some reason he didn't.

If we weren't constantly in crisis because of the Punic Wars I think there would be more arguing about number of troops raised/deployed. We also didn't have an armaments concession, which is a great kickback as the troops get raised. The fleet one really did produce a lot of money (particularly as we lost stuff to the storms at sea).

If Dick and Cory want to chime in about what they saw you might get some good counter-perspective.
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dick Leban
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmb
Weloi Avala wrote:
It'd be nice for some kind of insight into what drives the infighting hinted at throughout your report--why some proposals are shot down or prosecutions are started....
I'll blather on a bit here.

First ya have to understand that this is game #3 for most of us and every game has seen a completely new player who knows nothing more than the name of the game. I've done my darnedest to instill the fear of Rome falling into the new players, as well as a healthy respect for exactly how much Rome likes her war heroes.

Games #1 and #3 have also had rather tough war draws. We really didn't have much chance for serious politicking. #2 I think we were still learning the rules, plus we only had four players (as we did in #1, #3 had 5). The 2 on 2 dynamic isn't the best for this game.

Having said that, in #3 there was indeed some politicking going on. I'm pretty sure Andy knew that even though he had Scipio (took him forever to show up) and we had Punic wars to fight, it was going to be a cold day in the underworld before the Senate appointed him Dictator just so he could go whack a doubled First Punic with both Hannibal and Hasdrubal. Particularly when he was already sitting on 21 influence. Andy did what he could to get Scipio farther along but we weren't going to let him. I'm not sure anyone would have succumbed to a back room secret deal either.

Regarding prosecutions, our three games have only seen a limited number occur. Each time we've all gotten on the suck the first turn and for the most part used the talents to help Rome. I think there's definitely been some pocketing of funds and most factions don't really announce exactly how many talents were earned in a revenue phase. I'm usually trying to do mine correctly as well as checking over the new guy's work.

I tried to prosecute Grant in #2, Andy in #3, and somebody nailed Todd in #1, all because the accused were in larger factions. We're still learning prosecutions too, it wasn't until #3 that I was pointing out in advance how the accused's popularity affected the outcome. We really don't have the prosecution rules down yet. My outline helps, but it's still a mouthful to us.

Having said that, in #3's midgame I knew I wasn't in front but still had a good shot to make the right deals and slip out on top at the end. At the time Andy had two red markers (major or corrupt, I forget which) on his senators and had the largest faction and voting block. I started making some comments earlier about how well "the new guy" was doing to set things up and get the others thinking the right way. Later when I had a chance I tried to get one of his lesser senators killed off. I failed, but Andy had whipped out that +1 to Assassinations card and managed to get his faction leader killed off instead. I think at that point the rest of us were much happier and we didn't push too hard to convict Andy's lackey.

We're also starting to pay attention as to who has the Prior Consul markers and how many get sent off to fight.

Part of our problem is simply that the Early Republic can get so darned tough. The Senate has to work together and if things get bad whoever happens to have the right statesman gets a big opportunity. The 4 player games had the 2 on 2 dynamic which really doesn't make for a good game, while in our 3 player game Morticia the High Priestess of Pluto--I mean Laurie--never really had a decent enough faction to make the 3 on 2 leaders dynamic work right.

Andy was also threatening a Diplomacy-style armageddon ploy, but it's nice to know that it won't really work in Rome because the Senate has to approve all the fighting. Sure, Rome might have not been able to send the best Senator as Field Consul, but a few more legions and the difference is moot. Usually.

I think the next game is going to see more prosecutions, but I've said that after every game now.

We're really looking forward to the later scenarios with more loot and room for maneuvering, but we really need to make sure everyone understands the rebellion rules. I know both Cory and Grant have been reading their VG rules and have been keeping an eye out to make a province rebel, but we've never dealt with the full rebellion rules or even garrisons at all yet. #2 saw some provincial forces and I've been mentioning how they and the garrisons would act should a governor rebel, but I'm not really sure we're quite ready for it yet.

#3 also saw a nice string of vetoes and fighting over one Censor election and which poor schmuck was going to govern our sole province just long enough to fight the Punic War himself (#2 as well). In both cases I wasn't Presiding Magistrate and just shut up and kept my head down long enough to not get the governorship and get the Censor.

There definitely seems to be a bit of luck in having the right statesman the turn before he's needed, but I think we're all getting experienced enough that we can deal with the advantage that causes.

The Republic of Rome is really a fantastic game. There's the mechanics part of it that takes a game or two to learn, and then only once you manage to do so can you venture off into the world of enlightened self interest that is the Senate phase.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Johnson
United States
Cedar Park
Texas
flag msg tools
Well me known for eating cookie when me don't they shout
badge
Look! He try to throw loyal fans a curve!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
The Republic of Rome is really a fantastic game. There's the mechanics part of it that takes a game or two to learn, and then only once you manage to do so can you venture off into the world of enlightened self interest that is the Senate phase.


This is why I like the Early Republic for beginners. You've got a really strong reason to cooperate and not politic, especially with the Punic War. You get your feet wet with the mechanics before the knives come out.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Noakes
United Kingdom
Redhill
Surrey
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for all that! It's the kind of play-by-play with liner notes that I wish had been included in the rule book, like they did with Twilight Struggle.

The game's meant to be hitting British shores this week, so hopefully I'll get to crack it out myself this weekend!

Cheers,
M.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Pennino
Canada
Montreal
Quebec
flag msg tools
Hi Grant, great post. A fine example of play that can be used to try and better comprehend the rules. I do have one question concerning the end of your game.

You mention in the description of turn VIII that "...the knowledge that Rome was no longer under immediate threat of collapse. This signified the end of the Early Republic as it had weathered the storms."

Was this an allusion to the fact that you had drawn the end of era card in turn VIII or did the game end because you had exhausted the early republic deck?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dick Leban
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmb
mpenni2 wrote:
Was this an allusion to the fact that you had drawn the end of era card in turn VIII or did the game end because you had exhausted the early republic deck?
Not really. Since Rome can survive with three active wars, once you learn the deck and defeat a bunch of wars there comes a point where everyone knows that Rome will survive. In our case we had the two Punics and one Macedonian out and only planned to fight whatever the fourth was.

Well, except of course for the newer VG "end of era" deck construction rules, since a few cards from the middle deck might now make it into play.... The Senate decided to believe the "feel good" dreck they'd been feeding the populace all game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Johnson
United States
Cedar Park
Texas
flag msg tools
Well me known for eating cookie when me don't they shout
badge
Look! He try to throw loyal fans a curve!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
You mention in the description of turn VIII that "...the knowledge that Rome was no longer under immediate threat of collapse. This signified the end of the Early Republic as it had weathered the storms."

Was this an allusion to the fact that you had drawn the end of era card in turn VIII or did the game end because you had exhausted the early republic deck?


I wrote it to signify we pulled the End of Era card- it was the second turn of the Forum phase. It wasn't unexpected- Dick and I were (publicly) counting wars and had noted that everything but the Syrian War had come out. Everyone knew the end was coming since Turn VII- once we'd settled that 4 Active Wars wouldn't be around to sack Rome we started adding up influence. The income phase took longer than usual as we prepared the final push.

Andy also played a statesman during the Revolution Phase of Turn 7 that had a gray border- that signified we had 12 or fewer cards left in the draw deck.

We could have drawn something nasty out of our 6 Middle Republic cards but there were a lot of red cards being drawn on Turn VII. We were all pretty sure it was drawing to a close.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Noakes
United Kingdom
Redhill
Surrey
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just wanted to add that, having received a copy and laid the game out on the table and worked through a turn or two, your session report's been tremendously helpful. It all makes sense now! How many of the optional rules are you playing with? Sounds like the Pontifus Maximus, and appointing of advocates; any others? How long did you wait before throwing in those rules, or did you jump in first game whole hog?

Have some GG for your help! (I'm not sure what to do with the stuff, anyway....)

-M.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grant Johnson
United States
Cedar Park
Texas
flag msg tools
Well me known for eating cookie when me don't they shout
badge
Look! He try to throw loyal fans a curve!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We're playing with the following optional rules:

2.01 Pontifex Maximus
2.02 Provincial Wars (though we haven't really had enough provinces early to properly get it going- we expect more in the Middle Republic)
2.03 Rebel Governors (again, hasn't happened yet)

I think we'd like to get the rest of the optional rules in play (2.04 is disbanding Legions and 2.05 is for Laws) but they haven't really been suited for an EArly Republic game.

We've also used one item that I didn't spot in the rulebook but was a holdover from the AH game. If you put forth a motion in the Senate, and it is unanimously voted down by all other factions (i.e. your faction is the only one that voted for it) you must either resign your office or take a penalty to influence.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dick Leban
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmb
Weloi Avala wrote:
How many of the optional rules are you playing with? Sounds like the Pontifus Maximus, and appointing of advocates; any others?
I'd say now we're using all of them in that they're all mentioned somewhere in the outline we're using. I also try to mention them during the games at relevant points.

As Grant mentioned, successful rebellions aren't that easy in the Early Republic. In this game I think Grant was considering a governorship and rebelling which I also think is the reason he forgot about that province having to attack the Punic War. I know Cory was worried about Grant sneaking a win as a rebel governor during bankruptcy or a people's revolt.

Weloi Avala wrote:
How long did you wait before throwing in those rules, or did you jump in first game whole hog?
The first game was only the basic AH ruleset with a few changes (detailed in Grant's first session report). My primary goals were to illustrate how much better a politician gets after winning wars, how hard it is for Rome to survive, and a decent run through the game mechanics.

The VG version came out before our second game so I had some time to update the outline with everything but the rebellion and law rules. The third had them all. It helps now that both Grant and Cory have their own copies of the rulebook and are actually reading them.

Grant, the "epic fail" senate proposal rule is VG 1.09.144. I love the numbering systems.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.