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The Republic of Rome» Forums » General

Subject: Thematic cause for prosecution rss

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Michael Noakes
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Hello,

Just reading through the rules (again) prior to receiving my copy of the game, and was curious about the (thematic?) reasons for a major prosecution.

The minor seems clear enough: corruption charges, profiteering, etc...; but why does simply being elected to a major office leave one open to a major prosecution that could easily lead to death? Is it a game mechanism to prevent runaway influence leaders, or are there thematic reasons that I, woefully ignorant of Roman history, am unaware of?

Thanks!
-M.
 
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Grant Johnson
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Game wise it is to punish the people who are way out in front. The guilty verdict results in the execution of the senator so its pretty severe penalty. But it keeps one player from getting so far in front that they're uncatchable. It's also nice because it drains out money for votes and/or tribune cards.

Thematically, they abused the office. You can trump up the charges however you like but I'd typically suggest:

1. Losing military commander= committed treason by conspiring with Rome's enemies.
2. Winning military commander= was planning a treasonous rebellion.
3. Censor = Was corrupt and didn't prosecute to hide it, or prosecuted unjustly for personal gain
4. Consul = Misappropriation of power, acting outside Rome's best interest
5. PM = False prophetic visions, inciting the population against the state
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Jason Sherlock
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It was fairly common in Rome to prosecute officials to get them out of the way. Most of the time it lead to a seizure of their assets and exile (which might as well be death in game terms),

Cato the lesser felt that Caesar was getting too powerful, so he arranged for him to be prosecuted for corruption. The senate put a sword in Magus Pompeius's hand and told him to bring back Caesar in chains. It didn't work out quite the way that Cato expected.

The thing about the court system of ancient Rome was that if you were prosecuted for corruption, you were pretty much found guilty before the trial even began. It was often better to become a rebel; at least with some legions behind you, you stood a chance.
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Michael Noakes
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Ah! So trumped up charges and falsified evidence is the order of the day. Fantastic! Look forward to my first prosecution (hopefully this Sunday). The advocate rules seem to make it even better....

-M.
 
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