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Subject: How to make a custom board game box? rss

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Justin Foster
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Davenport
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Does anyone have any ideas on how to make a custom board game box. I assume I would have to take mesurments. What kind of wood do you recommend using i hear ceadar is nice but it can get expensive. I really am kinda of looking for a general tutorial with pictures would be a big plus. Anyone have any experience your help would be greatly appreciated.I searched for a post on this but could not locate any results. Thanks in advance.
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eryn roston
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try here?

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/310575/cardboard-box-bui...
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Justin Foster
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Great recommendation, however I was looking for more along the lines of wood plans, any more recomendations would be great. Thanks for trying, i do appreciate it!
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Erhan Cubukcuoglu
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Can you detail your box project, what is the approx. size for box, have you any woodworking equipment or experience, what quality and cost do you expect, a box for a war game style wold war 1 games may be very different then a box for a game themed medieval age.
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Chris toph
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Depending on your needs you might be able to find something that is already close to what you want.
I was searching for a arkham horror card storage solution for month when I found this:


The dimensions of the box are almost perfect. Some additional wood for dividers and: me is happy! (although I am still waiting for the last expansion and need to finish this )

ps: that cost me about 12Euros
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Justin Foster
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Perfect just what I was looking for, did you make that yourself? Could you give me any tips?
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Chris toph
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jfoster1980 wrote:
Perfect just what I was looking for, did you make that yourself? Could you give me any tips?

I found the box in a hardware store. It didn't have any dividers, so I bought the lath (correct word?) you can see in the picture, and using a saw cut the dividers. What's left to do is doing some dividers orthogonal to those already in for some stability.
Hence I can't give you advice on the box it self. I just wanted to say it's possible to find something suitable that can be modified easily...
Good luck!
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Andrea Doria
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Ok, making a box. You're going to need

1. An appropriate quantity of half-inch plank; obviously ply wood is not going to work. Something better than the very soft "white wood" they sell in Home Depot would be preferable, if only because it tends to splinter. You can stain at the end to get pretty much whatever color you want.

2. A miter saw. Unfortunately, you'll need to be cutting on pieces that won't fit in the little plastic miter boxes that they sell in most hardware stores, so if you or a neighbor has a shop with a good mounted one that would be superb.

3. A good chisel, 1/4 inch or a little smaller.

4. Wooden mallet for use with chisel.

5. A table saw (or a hand saw and a really good eye).

6. Drawer clamps

Steps
1. Cut the sides of the box; leave an additional 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch on each edge except those edges that will be the top of the box.

2. Dovetail the connecting edges. We're not making real, full-blown cabinet-maker's dovetails, just interlocking notches. Make a series of cuts, running lengthways on the short ends and shortways on the long end (bottom of the side pieces): each cut should be as deep as the overhang you left in step 1, and they should be a 1/4 inch apart. This is where you will need the miter saw.

3. Dovetails stage 2. Using the chisel, remove alternating notches (created by the cuts in step 2) so that the sides fit together at 90 degree angles to form a rectangle. Notice, of course, that you will have to remove the opposite notches on the long and short end pieces. Using a pencil, draw an X on the notches that will be removed before you begin. To remove a notch, place the chisel at the base of the notch (where the cuts on either side of it end, that is), and drive the chisel straight down through the base of the notch using the mallet.

4. The bottom: for the bottom of your box, cut a rectangle of the appropriate size, leaving the overhang described in step 1 for all four edges. Cut notches in each edge to match up with notches in the bottom of each side piece.

5. Slather wood glue in between the notches and fit the assembly together. Do not glue more sides at once than you have clamps to hold (so, e.g., if you only have a single clamp, you can glue both short sides to one long side, because you can hold that whole assembly in place with a single clamp). It would be best to do all four sides in one step and the bottom in a second step. Before clamping, wipe away the excess glue that squeezes out from between the notches when the pieces are fitted together.

6. The Lid. You will notice that none of these instructions mention the box's lid. There are several methods of attach a lid: hinges, sliding on channels (see the images here), lifting and held on by dowels or ridges. The sliding lids can be made relatively simply if you have a table saw with a recessing blade, but only with substantial difficulty otherwise. If your tools are limited, hinges might be best (attach the hinges before construction, but attach the lid itself last).
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Justin Foster
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Great thank you thats a great tutorial for me to start with once made i'll post results. Thanks every so much.
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Donald Cleary
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If you don't have power tools, or at least a miter box, I'd go looking for a silverware set. The really nice old ones are always in fairly sturdy boxes that are about the right size.
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Andrea Doria
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Quote:
If you don't have power tools, or at least a miter box, I'd go looking for a silverware set. The really nice old ones are always in fairly sturdy boxes that are about the right size.


That's a fantastic suggestion. And a lot easier (although building one is really only a good idea if you would enjoy the process).

P.S. -- I did forget to mention back when I wrote the original steps that a carpenter's square, to be used to make sure you get the sides joined at right angles, would also be necessary.
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Victor Watrous
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I just made a box for my buddy who won the Acquire game in an auction, but it came without the box. He wanted a very sturdy box as he has a large collection and will probably stack games on it.

I used mounting board, which is a 2mm thick cardboard with white paper on both sides. Relatively inexpensive also. Got a 30" by 40" sheet for less than $7 at an art supply store. I couldn't find it at a craft store, and as I found, "mounting board" is easily misinterpreted. The girl at the craft store thought I was talking about foam core board.

It can be cut with a sharp hobby knife, but I used a table saw--much faster.

I used a white glue to hold it together. It dries quickly but still provides some working time.

Cut the lid at least 7mm longer in length and width of the box bottom so you got some space between the sides of the box bottom and the box lid. The first one I made I cut the lid only 5 mm longer in both directions and had a hard time getting the lid off.

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Silverware boxes are an excellent idea! Surplus instrument cases should work too (i.e. scientific instruments, not trombones etc). I must go looking...

There are gift packages of teabags which come in nice wooden cases (Twinings for instance). These are already divided into sections: I store my Wings of War minis in one of these and it works really well.

-R
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Richard Dewsbery
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I've made a couple of boxes from scratch, using wood cut to size on a table saw (by the local timber merchants) then finished with hand tools. One for Race for the Galaxy and one for Agricola.






Cutting lots of little finger joints by hand, using a tiny razor saw, was a complete pain. But in terms of the skill level required, I learned all that I know about woodwork in one year of woodworking lessons at school aged 12. The most important factor in getting something that looks and feels good is probably the time devoted to the finishing - applying the varnish in several coats and lots of sanding. The other important factors are planning what you do before you do it (making up test pieces where necessary) and patience.

I've just invested a large chunk of change on a second hand router and complex jig that will allow me to cut all the joints by hand much more quickly in future, and I plan to make more boxes (especially some for Dominion). I'm still steeling myself for how much the wood is going to cost me (I plan on using cherry, as a good compromise between cost, looks, strength and weight), but given how much I've dropped on the tools it'd be a mistake to scrimp on the actual materials now.

I reckon (probably wrongly, but what the heck) that with the router making the joints, and a table saw as soon as the right model comes up on ebay, I should be able to churn out half a dozen identical boxes in the time that it was taking me to make just one by hand. The plan being to keep one of each box that I make and flog the rest.
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Paul Dale
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I've made a few and really there isn't anything special to it. Figure out the dimensions you need and make a box with those internally. Add partitions as required (assuming you added some slop for this in the first place). Then decorate and varnish.

The hardest bit is making the box itself. You have to make semi-accurate cuts to do this. I personally avoid dovetails and just cut the corners at 45 degrees. However a simple butt joint also works -- so long as you've a good contact area, the glue will out perform the wood.

Some examples:



and



The cards are laying on their sides in the second one due to a measuring and thinking problem. My wife did the poker work on both.


- Pauli
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Todd
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Those boxes look good Richard and Paul. I am just getting into woodworking and trying to figure out what board game related projects I should be working on.

Being as Ticket to Ride and Settlers are both a huge amount of stuff, (With expansions and all that) perhaps boxes for them would be a good way to start.
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Richard Dewsbery
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Boxes are pretty much the simplest things to make from wood (apart from sawdust and wood chippings). Some tips - measure twice & cut once, clamp everything square while it's glueing, and spend lots of time sanding and oiling/varnishing. The more time spent on the finish, the better it looks.

There are various ways to complicate things (hinged lids) or keep things simple (sliding lids), depending upon the tools available.

I'm hoping that various bits of machinery I've bought will help me to churn out more and better boxes, but it's all come to a dead stop right now as I've lost the spanner to change the blade on the table saw.
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Gerald Monkey
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Sorry to bump this but am looking for inspiration after doing a woodworking course and wanting to make something.

I was thinking along the lines of a large box with separate drawers for different games maybe?

Anybody else done anything like this as the pictures give some good 'inspiration'
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Brian
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This is my practice for larger boxes.



I have been thinking about making a 'campaign chest' style box myself.
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