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Subject: How to get your friends to the "Power Grid Level"? rss

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Boardgame nooby Boardgame nooby
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basically,

How do u get your friends into meaty boardgames?
 
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thomas coe
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start slow and increase.

really, it's just a feel that you have for your friends. do they want to think more while playing or just drink and joke it up?

if it's the former, introduce them to a game that requires some strategy. if they take to that, keep moving up the "meaty" scale. pretty soon, you'll be playing all games and enjoying it immensely.

now if they were of the latter group...well....pull out the tables, cups, ping pong balls, and beer and just enjoy your night of beer pong!!!
 
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Ernesto Cabrera
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Simply put: teach them to play Power Grid.

No, really. I think "gateway games" are a fallacy because lots of people get rules differently. I do think there are simpler games but if you want to play Power Grid with your friends just tell them: Hey! I have this cool game about *add subject*.

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Aaron Lambert
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I think it all depends on the person. Do they enjoy boardgames in the first place? Do they handle games with more complex rules (beyond the simpler Liar's Dice, Say Anything, Ticket to Ride, and Carcassonne)? Do they enjoy games that are more strategic? Then they're probably a prime candidate for games like Power Grid, Caylus, Twilight Struggle, etc.

I have some friends who really like the lighter games but their brains completely freeze up if you try to introduce them to something with more than just a couple basic rules. And than other people I know definitely understand the more complicated games but just lose interest because they don't want to have to work at building and maintaining a solid strategy.

Now, if you can find someone who will play Here I Stand, you've basically just found boardgaming gold.
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Brandon Holmes
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lestat2099 wrote:
Simply put: teach them to play Power Grid.

No, really. I think "gateway games" are a fallacy because lots of people get rules differently. I do think there are simpler games but if you want to play Power Grid with your friends just tell them: Hey! I have this cool game about *add subject*.



100% disagree.

A lot of these games have similar concepts, rules, strategies etc. The more you play them the easier it is to move on to more difficult options. It becomes familiar and second nature over time. "This game is just like Catan..." etc. A lot of players seem to clam up when you try to teach them something entirely new though.

Now other people can pick them up right away. Usually these are people you knew all along would love board games but they never game them the chance. Most non-gamers though won't pick up a game like Power Grid right away. Don't fool yourself. Try explaining a game like this to an "average person". Seriously, go do it! If it was so simple all our spouses and families would be board game geeks like us too.

I have no doubt lestat2099 has had this experience, I am just saying it is not the norm. A "geek" can pick these games up quickly. The average person can't.
 
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Jeff Forbes

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A few points.

1) Not everyone likes to think.

2) There is no such thing as a gateway game. "Gateway games" are going to be different for person to person. For example, I've never had great love for Settlers of Catan. My gateway games were Agricola and RFTG. Stuff like Carcassonne, Dominion - yes, I like it, but they've never been as strategic or involved as what really attracted me.

3) If they like to think a little bit... bring it out and play it.

Seriously, there's no need for gnashing of teeth here. As long as you're comfortable teaching the rules, and people are willing to play a game, then, great!

Some people seem to be afraid of more complicated things, and may or may not desire to ever touch them. Respect that.

Your goal shouldn't be to slowly work people up to a moderate game, but find the ones that are willing to try it. This can change over time, but you don't need specific games to do this. The people that previously had no interest in a 2 hour game may at some point they want to invest 10-15 minutes in learning and 2 hours in playing - but don't push it.

For very complex or difficult games, it may help to start with a more simple version of the same system (Railroad Tycoon -> Steam), so when they play the more brutal version, they will have a grasp of some strategy... but it isn't required.
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Brandon Holmes
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Boardgame nooby wrote:
basically,

How do u get your friends into meaty boardgames?


Back to your question...

This is still a work in progress for me so I can't say with 100% but getting them to relax, have fun, have some self-confidence that they DO understand these "complicated european games" etc. seems to be working. The way to do that is find games they enjoy, start light and slowly build them up. Capture them as an audience, make them enjoy board games almost as much as you do!

Over time, bit by bit, I see my family and friends starting to "get" my games. Rule explanations are getting easier and easier, and even when a game bombs, I know they are ready for another because so many have been home runs! This let's me relax and frankly, I am enjoying going slow now.

My original plan was Carcassone - Catan - Stone Age - Agricola. Give them a couple games of each and move up. The reality was Stone Age was their limit and Carc was the one they enjoyed most. Worse yet, games like Agricola almost swore them off board gaming forever. So a year later I decide to rewind and go to a Carc-like level and go slow. We are verging on Stone Age level again but the difference is this time my family and friends request games! When I come over the first thing they ask is "what games did you bring?".

We may never get to Agricola level but man, this is so much better!
 
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Boardgame nooby Boardgame nooby
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thanks guys

you all freakin Rock

k, a lil background

Got into boardgames a couple months ago,
Dad bought the game wasabi and i became instantly hooked.
Pente is pretty awesome, and i love stratego/risk. also monopoly
Started researchin some award winning boardgames

Aquire ( looked good, but looked blank)
Munchkin, ( i prob wont get cause ppl tell me its not too good)
Puerto Rico
San Juan look


I want to sell all my v games and get some sick boardgames
a buddy of mine has settlers of catan and it looked Sweet!!!



so one of the few nerds of the group,

the killer bunny card game looked like my groups kinda game
*is the killer bunny card game a good game?*

my crowd isnt a very smart crowd, they do pretty stupid stuff actually lol,

We have played axis and allies, and it just went baaaad lol, they dont have a very good attention span :/ bummer
they wanna have a good time,
but they did wanna learn.
I want my buds to get into meaty games, i dont want to scare em away though.
Someone told me, to start with Dominion, and work your way up.

Dominion looks alright, but its a card game :/
mmm, persuade me?

**what are your thoughts on dominion?**


and

**What games(list please ) can i build up to get my friends to the "Power Grid Level"?**
 
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Pieter
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lestat2099 wrote:
just tell them: Hey! I have this cool game about *add subject*.

"Hey! I have this cool game about... running... power plants... No, really, it is cool I tell you!"

Would that work? Maybe Die Macher is better.

Anyway, as a serious answer to the OP's question: Power Grid is actually not that hard a game to teach to people. It is fairly easy to get into. I'd say it is a step up from Catan, but not by much.
 
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Ernesto Cabrera
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Flyboy Connor wrote:
lestat2099 wrote:
just tell them: Hey! I have this cool game about *add subject*.

"Hey! I have this cool game about... running... power plants... No, really, it is cool I tell you!"


I always say "cool" twice when explaining games, especially when I teach Bohnanza to someone...

"BEANS??? c'mon... a game about beans!?"

By the way, after reading some of the descriptions of your buddies I highly recommend to stay away from "Eurogames" like Power Grid... at first.

Buy Talisman instead and see your friends have a nerd-gasm when they see it...

Try games that encourage "fun" behaviour first: Cash and Guns, Cosmic Encounter, Bohnanza, games with lots of trading or interaction (you said Settlers, try Settlers), then when they're hooked in, try more "strategic games" like Power Grid...

That's how I did it!. The interaction through the boardgames can also help you know their tastes as they develop them. Some may not like the strategy in games, some may want more of it, some may like more interaction or sometimes just a "light game" (like Ticket to Ride)

The most important thing about "initiating" your friends is to make them more open about all kinds of boardgames. At first it was really difficult to me to get my friends to try something new. The last week I got three new games to the table... they liked all of them.

It's just a matter of time, don't panic. I have a copy of Twilight Imperium that has been sitting in my shelf since the day I bought it three years ago (only played once). But now i know my friends are ready for it...
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Mike Bazynski
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I have better success simply teaching PG to friends than trying to work them up. the ones needing to be worked up end up prefering lighter stuff anyways in the end, the ones that end up in the PG-18xx bracket would mostly be turned off from gaming altogether if I tried to start them on Carcassonne. people who are likely to love PG need to be convinced those games of yours are not for kids, and the way to do it is to show them a real thing from get go.
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Shawn Woods
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My games:

Carcassonne -> Settlers -> Caylus

I would have skipped Settlers if I would have known how repetitive and luck-based it was. Carcassonne was the only Euro/designer game I owned (and knew about) for over a year. I still enjoy Carcassonne + proper expansions, but don't play Settlers. Technically, I bought Caylus before Settlers, it just arrived in the mail a couple days after.

I think anyone can play nearly any game of any difficult. Heck, I taught my mom Caylus, Twilight Struggle, and Tigris & Euphrates and she was coming off of games like Skip-Bo, Scrabble, and Carcassonne.

Just have to read the rules several times, watch a video, read these forums. There are so many helpful people on the Geek that I am not afraid to try any game.

Now, some War Games are a little intimidating due to their encyclopedia rulebooks (ASL). So, I guess I should not include War Games in my "any game" comment.
 
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Tobias Lundberg
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I just bought games and started to play them with my friends when they were here. Now plenty of them have bought their own games (sometimes the same games I have, sometimes other ones).

I just wanted to play games, and my friends (with a few exceptions) really enjoyed it
 
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lestat2099 wrote:
It's just a matter of time, don't panic. I have a copy of Twilight Imperium that has been sitting in my shelf since the day I bought it three years ago (only played once). But now i know my friends are ready for it...
Haha, the first game I introduced my group to was Carcassonne, and after that it was TI3. We've never looked back since
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Kevin C.
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Quote:
We may never get to Agricola level but man, this is so much better!


Who was it "better" for, though?

You say that your family enoyed Carc the most. If the point was a fun family time instead of just creating game partners for yourself, why not allow them to simply enjoy Carc? My family loves Kingsburg. We play it all the time. The idea that there is some further step up from this doesn't really enter my mind. If they enjoy it and I enjoy spending time with them, thinking about how to get them to Agricola would just ruin it for me...and them.

These threads always rub me the wrong way for some reason. I think the best solution is the obvious one given way up at the top...communicate with your friends and take their desires into account. We are talking about competent human beings here capable of making their own decisions, right? "Hey, I've got this game that I would like you guys to try. I think you would enjoy it. What do you say?"

Why does one need plans or some progressive flow-chart of a game ladder to get friends and family to a plateau that only exists in the gamer's mind? Maybe I read too much into these things, but there always seems to be a nugget of selfishness at the bottom. "I want to play my type of game, but my friends and family aren't up to the task. They only enjoy "lesser" games. How do I make them do what I want?"

Someone that expresses a desire to get into the hobby is one thing, but feeling stressed about "converting" others to the hobby seems a odd tack to take to me. I would suggest simply enjoying the playtime and not worrying about what the next step on the ladder is. Try to find pleasure in the experience regardless of the game and then ask your friends about the choice for new games. You might find sharing the process leads to more fruitful results.

Also, you could try and find a game group that is made of people that share your passion already. You do away with any frustration or stress that comes from people not moving quickly enough for you or you having to play games you don't really want to play as "stepping stones."

Good luck.

Kevin




 
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