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Subject: So, is this considered a eurogame? rss

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I wouldn't for some reason, and that's beyond my dislike for this game. It seems to have more in common with a typical american style economy game like Acquire than anything else.


Curious to hear what others have to say.
 
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Tim Collins
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Thats odd, I consider aquire to be very much like a euro. Im not sure what makes it non-euro. This game is like Aquire lite to me an though its very light wieght I enjoy this game a lot. The most recent edition is beautiful, its simple, and it's easy to teach and play. I have enjoyed every game of it I have played. however, It will not work with every crowd for sure.

You dont say why you dislike this game howver and Im curious as to why?
 
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Burke Glover
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My thoughts:
A) American designed or not, a lot of folks consider Acquire one of the precursors to modern Euro-style design. Some have described it as the first Euro.

B) The similarities between Chinatown and Acquire are, to me, mostly superficial. Acquire is about stock speculation, and payoffs are a function of how much stock you own and how large those companies are. Meanwhile Chinatown is all about trading and negotiation, and the payoffs are a function of the size of individual companies wholly owned by you. There's a wide gulf between pure trade/negotiation game and a pure stock speculation game.

C) As to Euro vs. American, I'll play devil's advocate for now even though I consider Chinatown firmly in the Euro camp. I think you could make a valid argument for it being American-style, if you pushed the trading aspect: Most Euro style trading games have some sort of randomizer that determines what resources you get to trade. In that way you could say they are refinements upon Monopoly: Get randomly determined resources, trade those resources. Settlers, Bohnanza, and Chinatown all follow this pattern, but with drastically reduced randomness. Traders of Genoa nearly eliminates the randomness, but at the cost of increased complexity.

Anyway, putting my devil's advocate hat away, I'd say it's in the Euro camp based on: lower randomness, lower complexity, more time spent trading (or making other decisions), shorter play time. But I note there's a weakness in my argument--I'm not all that familiar with American trading/negotiation games other than Monopoly and that oddball, Pit. So it could be that there are other American-style trading games that Chinatown resembles.

Edit: Just wanted to make clear that I am very fond of both Chinatown and Acquire. I love trading/negotiation, so if anyone knows of any good American-style wheeling and dealing games I'd love to hear about them.
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