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Subject: Republic of Rome Rules Explained (Valley Games edition) rss

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Introduction
If you are like me, you heard about Valley Games’ reprint of a classic game entitled The Republic of Rome. Politics, back-stabbing assassinations, empire expansion, and warmongering: what could be better? So based on the reviews, you jumped onto the pre-order bandwagon and then went to look for the old Avalon Hill rule book … and quickly threw down the 24-page legal document. You anxiously awaited VG’s remake of the rules only to find out they expanded it to 40 pages and the thing makes the US Federal Tax Code look like the Sunday Funnies!

As I discovered after forcing my way to the end and many read-throughs later, this game really isn’t that difficult. There are a few road-blocks in the rules that make this game appear more difficult yet I can’t really fault the rules. They were based on the old AH version of numbering, which in and of itself, can make the reading process difficult. But the rules are complete (or mostly so as the production version of the rules did need an editor to make them a bit cleaner).

My goal here is to provide a comprehensive overview of the rules in a more conversational tone. It is not meant as a substitute for the actual rules (which can be found here: Living Rules) and I will gloss over a few things that aren’t applicable in an Early Era, first-time game. My hope is that this will “clear the fog” so that your next read through of the rules makes much more sense. I am definitely not an expert as I, like most of you, only began delving into this game a couple of months ago. As I am not sure where each of you needs help, I will present this in the most logical manner for myself. If you grasp that concept of the game, please jump over that section. The outline is as follows:

1. Overview
2. Components
3. Setup
4. Game Play
5. Detail of Cards
6. Ending the Game


Board Game: The Republic of Rome


1. Overview
So let's start with the obvious. This is a game about the Roman Senate during the time of the Republic. The players represent a faction (think political party) of individual Senators. These Senators are trying to elect officers, pass out favors/sources of income (concessions), get rid of powerful enemies (appoint governors), pass some other miscellaneous bills, and fight, or more appropriately, defend against some wars.

The game is divided into three scenarios, called Eras. Each of the Eras plays a bit differently. The Early Era is supposed to be easier because (a) there are a fewer game concepts to worry about (like Laws) and (b) it is more of a true co-operative game at this point. It is harder because you have few resources and need to figure out how to work together. So like most co-ops where the game is working against you, you'll probably have your butt handed to you. Regardless, you won’t have the time to think about personal gain.

The Middle Era is a bit of a breather as a few more concepts are added and you have more time to build your personal empire. Most likely someone will win by influence as their Senators gain power. The Late Era has a few more concepts and everyone is out to get each other to be top dog. While Influence might still be the key way to win, there is a good chance someone will rebel and take the Republic by force, bringing about the Empire (and the end game).

Those are the different scenarios. You'll most likely want to start with the Early Era. The Solo game is quite a bit different from the 3-6 player game so most suggest you do NOT try to learn the game that way. If you are going to do a dry run on your own, then set up the game for 3 or 4 players and play as if you were 4 people. Or try to jump in a PBEM game (though that will be of the AH version and not the VG edition). As mentioned, we will focus only on the Early Era game below.

2. Components
If you have a fairly good grasp of what is included in your game, you can skip this part. For those that are a little confused with what they have, here is the quick summary.

Cards
The engine of the game is the 160 Scenario cards (Republic of Rome back). This is where you will find the Senators, Wars, Leaders, and other cards drawn and played during the game. You will use about a third to almost half of the cards in any given basic game. These cards are marked by their border (white, gray, red) and we will be mostly using just the White deck in this early game. Cards are further distinguished by their text color. Anything in Red-text (Faction card) will initially go to your hand and will have specific times you can play it. Anything with Black-text (Forum card) typically goes to the board. We’ll get into more details about these later.

Board Game: The Republic of Rome


The other two “decks” of cards are your double-sided Provinces, which only come into play after defeating a War or specific event and the double-sided Event cards which will be discussed later. The former has a yellow/green border on each side while the later has light blue/dark blue borders.

Board
The board is like one giant spreadsheet that has all the game charts (for resolving dice rolls) and places to keep track of things: like the State Treasury, the Unrest Level, etc. Besides these reference areas, the three most important spaces are the Forum (the map), the Curia, and the multiple War sections. Cards will be placed on the different sections of these boards through-out the game. If something is in the Forum, it is readily available to be taken up by a player. Depending on the type of card, it will only be available during certain Phases of the game. Anything in the Curia is in a holding pattern for now. It has the chance to be revived and sent to the Forum, or it might die and be removed from the game. Generally, things don’t move out of the Curia on a whim. The War slots are to keep track of the different Wars and how they are classified at any given time. More on that later. The War section also has the Draw Pile and Discard Pile. Any card “discarded” is technically removed from the game as there is no way to retrieve it and the discards will never be shuffled back into the deck.

Board Game: The Republic of Rome

Image by Velusion

Markers
A typical AH game, this has a lot of markers. For your first run, you need to just focus on the following. Those placed on the board to keep track of various things: State Revenue, Unrest, and later, Manpower Shortage and Droughts. The ever ominous Mortality Chits – to be placed in something opaque. Items you can collect: the Talents (money) and Knights, along with the number chits to modify your stats. The Faction Leader markers (corresponding to one of the game’s faction symbols) are used to identify your “main” senator. The Major Office markers, along with the corrupt/major tokens, and prior consul markers. And finally, the Legions and Fleets to fight the wars. The rest will come up later, or in one of the variations of the game.

Board Game: The Republic of Rome

Image by wellspokenman

3. Setup
I am not sure why setup got relegated to the middle of the book but there it is. To setup, each player controls a Faction of 3 Family (black-text) Senators that start the game face-up in front of them. They will also each have 3 Faction (red-text) cards to form their hand. These cards might be Concessions, Statesman Senators, or Intrigue cards. Each player also grabs his Treasury Box which will track his votes and collect his Faction talents.

The deck is built, basically of the white-bordered cards but with a few gray ones, along with the Era Ends (the game ender), mixed in at the bottom. Four Legions are set out to represent Rome’s earliest forces. The 1st Punic War is in the Inactive War slot, silent for now but ready to go active very soon. You also randomly select a Temporary Rome Consul to establish your HRAO (highest ranking available officer). The HRAO is a generic term to identify the highest officer, based first on Major Office by the number in the bottom left corner and then by the lowest ranking ID# of a Senator. Officially, the HRAO runs the Senate Phase but in our games he also unofficially runs the game's flow.

If you have any Concessions or Statesmen cards (from those dealt to you earlier), you may play them right away to help grow your faction or earn more income. You can also sit on them and possibly trade with the others later. You assign a Faction Leader which basically boils down to a Senator who earns you a few more bucks (3T vs. 1T) and who can't be persuaded to leave. Adjust your vote counter (on the Treasury Box) to the sum of all your Senators’ Oratory values.

First Game Tip wrote:
Consider assigning your Faction Leader to a Senator with low Loyalty. Those with a low Loyalty are easier to target in Persuasion Attempts so this will protect your most vulnerable Senator. Additionally, you might want to assign your Concessions there as well.
4. Game Play
The flow of the game is very simple. You follow these 7 Phases:

• Mortality
• Revenue
• Forum
• Population
• Senate
• Combat
• Revolution

Mortality
This is really just a housekeeping Phase with 2 steps and one isn’t used to start the game.

1) You advance any Wars that are sitting In the Imminent War section (skip on the first turn).
2) You randomly draw a single Mortality Chit to see if anyone dies of natural causes.

That's it.

Now, if you happen to select a Mortality Chit that matches a Senator in play, he “dies.” First, you always discard a Statesman (remember, red-text) that matches the number drawn; he is out of the game for good. Second, you discard all markers including Offices, Talents, Influence numbers, etc. The only marker you keep is the Faction Leader (FL) marker. If you have this FL marker, then you get to keep your Family Senator (black-text) – 'tis just a flesh wound. But if he doesn't have this FL marker to save him, he "dies" but goes to the Curia instead with a chance of coming back into play later (in the Forum Phase).

First Game Tip wrote:
In game terms, this Statesman reflects an individual – think John Kennedy – that, once dead, stays dead. The Family card represents a generic family member – think Edward Kennedy – that, once dead, passes on the legacy to a son, say Patrick, who might have to pass it on to the third generation. If “Edward” was the Faction Leader, then “Patrick” inherits the title (which is why you keep Family cards even after they die). But if “Edward” didn’t have the title, then “Patrick” goes out to try on his own (goes to the Curia to possibly resurface later).
Revenue
More housekeeping but slightly more involved. This is where you collect your money and think about your initial strategy for the turn.

1) Every Senator gets 1 Talent (T) and the FL gets 3T. (Rebels don't collect income but you shouldn't have to worry about them in the Early Era.)
2) Any Knights you have also give you 1T each. To start the game, you won't have any. You also collect the Concessions per the cards’ instructions. You must take this money and it will make you Corrupt for the turn (expose the word "Corrupt" on the Concession card).
3) If you have Provinces (which you won't in the Early Era to start), you may collect income from them. If you do, you are corrupt. If you don't, you can help the Province develop a little easier.
4) The State gets a refresh of 100T but then must subtract for Wars (none at this point) and Legions (which is 8 because of the 4 Legions to start the game).
5) You do a couple other things (like try to develop Provinces at this point) but they aren't in the first round so skip it!
6) Finally, you take all the Talents you have across your Faction and divide it up among your Senators and your Faction Treasury. You can even give it to other players at this point. Your Senators' Personal Treasuries are like checking accounts: you can spend from them freely during the turn (with some limitations). The Faction Treasury is like your savings account: once you put money in there, it is restricted for the turn and can only be used for very specific things. But next round, you can divide it up freely again along with your new income.

First Game Tip wrote:
Most of this might not make sense until you read the Forum Phase, but you need to start thinking about that Phase here. You will start the game with at least 5T (3 from your FL and 2 from each of the other Senators). If you managed to get another Senator or Concessions in the opening hand, you will have more Talents to spend. An individual Senator can bribe a Knight and spend 0-5 T to add to the die roll. Spending 5 guarantees a Knight, will return your investment in 5 rounds, and give you an extra vote. So placing 5T on 1 Senator is a good option. If there are less than 6 players, you may also consider stockpiling Talents on another Senator to try winning an extra Initiative or to bribe a future Senator, but both of these are less ideal in the first turn, I find. Finally, consider keeping the balance in your Faction Treasury will protect the money (remember that Talents on a Senator can be lost if he dies) and protect your Senators as a counter-bribe in Persuasion Attempts. In other words, spreading the wealth among your Senators is not a good idea and just waters their potential down for the turn.
Forum
Let’s be honest: this is the killer in the rulebook. If you haven’t already given up, this will put the dagger in your back. It literally takes like 5 seconds per player to perform but is the most confusing aspect of the rulebook.

Simply put, there are 6 "initiative sequences" - everyone gets one. Any that are left over get auctioned off. So with 4 players, everyone gets 1, and 2 will be left over. Everyone can bid on these leftovers. These sequences are basically a means for your Faction and Senators to improve themselves for the upcoming Senate Phase. You will either draw a card or play an event. Then you take a series of steps in order to gain or change things. Again, that’s it.


1) The HRAO (your Temporary Rome Consul) starts off. He rolls 2d6. If the result is a 7, he rolls again (this time with a 3d6) and he takes the matching Event form the blue-bordered deck. If he rolled anything other than a 7, he draws a card. If the card is a Faction (red-text) card, he puts in his hand. If it is Forum (black-text) card, it goes on the board. More on this later.

2) Then the HRAO can persuade another Senator. Most likely, this will not be done on the first turn, unless a Family Senator was drawn and placed in the Forum on step 1 above. No one will want to enrage their fellow players so early so it isn’t worth going after aligned Senators at this point (and you won’t have enough money to overcome their Loyalty).
3) Then the HRAO can persuade a Knight. You will want to do this. You can spend between 0-5 talents and then roll a die. Spending 5 is an auto win so you may want to do that for the first round.
4) Then the HRAO can sponsor games – you can skip this in the beginning.
5) Then the HRAO can change FL. No need to do this, really, especially at this point.

Once that is done, the next player in clockwise order does this whole sequence again. It continues until everyone has had a crack at one. Any leftover (in games with less than 6) are then auctioned off. The HRAO starts and everyone can pass or play. If no one bids, the HRAO gets it for free.

Given that there is a 16.7% chance to draw an event, in 6 initiatives, you will most likely have at least 1 Event played and 5 new cards drawn. If you start a deck with 71 cards and pass out anywhere from 18-36 (in 3 to 6 player games), you are only left with a deck of 35-53 cards. Drawing 5 a turn means you only have 7 to 11 turns on average.

First Game Tip wrote:
This was mostly covered in the Phase above. But again, hope for a card draw (on the 2d6 roll) and pray that it is a red-text one that can go to your hand. Try to get a Knight this turn for sure – probably for the Senator with the least Oratory (least votes) so that you can keep your Senators even in case one gets sent to War for being too powerful. Skip the Persuasion Attempt unless you drew a Family card (and it was placed in the Forum) and you think you can overcome his Loyalty with your Oratory, Influence, and limited Talents.
So what makes this so confusing in the rules? Step 1. You have 7 different types of cards you can draw and so they take this opportunity now to describe them all in detail. That is what 2.5 pages of this section cover.

Basically, if it is a red-text Faction card, it goes to your hand, you can't play it now. That would include Statesmen, Concessions, Laws, and Intrigue cards.

If it is a black-text Forum card, it goes to the board. This is where it starts getting tricky. If it is a Family card, it goes on the map (the Forum). If it is a Leader card, look to see if he has a Matching War (for example, Hannibal or Hamilcar with that 1st Punic War sitting out there). If he does not have a current Matching War, he goes to the Curia. If he does match a War, then he goes to the War and they both go the Active Wars slot. It is very bad to draw one of these 2 Leaders in the first round!

Finally, the last possible card is a War card. This is also a bit confusing. But basically, if it has no armament (shield) icon, it goes to the Inactive War slot. Unless it matches a Leader already in the Curia, in which case, they both go to the Active Wars. So if one player draws Philip in the first round, he goes to the Curia. If a Player draws the 2nd Macedonian War (no armament icon), it goes to the Inactive War slot. But if either card is on the board when the other is drawn, they both go to the Active War slot and Rome has a mess on her hands!

If the War card does have a shield, it goes to the Active Wars. It will also take a Matching Leader with it that happens to be sitting in the Curia. The exception to the War card going to the Active Wars is if there is already a Matching War in play. Then it goes to the Imminent War pile instead. This is basically to give you a chance to beat the first Matching War before it starts getting tougher with this new War.

So again, you start the game with 1st Punic War Inactive. If you draw Hannibal (Leader), he makes 1stPW Active so both 1stPW and Hannibal go to the Active War slot. Alternately, if you draw 2nd Punic War (typically Active because it has a shield), 2ndPW goes to the Imminent War slot instead and kicks out 1stPW to the Active War slot. So drawing either of these two cards (or Hamilcar, also a Punic Leader) will Activate 1st Punic War.

Finally, if you rolled 7 on the 2d6 in step 1, you do not get to draw a card but instead suffer an Event. You roll the 3d6 and see what the result matches up with on the table on the board. You put that Event card into play and follow the instructions. If the card was already in play from that round, you flip it over and follow the instructions on the back (dark blue side). If it was already flipped over, you ignore the Event (unless it specifically tells you to perform it again). Regardless of the outcome, you do not draw a card to your hand.

Population
Again, mostly just housekeeping as you deal with the “people” of Rome in 2 steps.

1) Adjust the Unrest Level based on Unprosecuted Wars (none at this point) and any Drought effects (won't be any unless you rolled for them as an Event or drew a War in the Forum Phase that has Drought Icons).
2) The HRAO gives a speech to further affect the Unrest Level. This is a 3d6 - Unrest + HRAO’s Popularity. Since both the Unrest and Popularity will be zero at this point, it is basically just a 3d6 roll for the first round.

Board Game: The Republic of Rome

Image by Cosmosys

Senate
This is the heart of the game. You must follow a strict order of things until the end. Basically, it goes in this format:

1) Elect Officers
. 1b) Prosecutions
2) Appoint Governors
3) Other Business

1) Elect Officers
a) The HRAO kicks things off by nominating a pair of Senators to be Consuls. He'll most likely try to form his coalition here by joining with 2 other Factions and passing out these two offices. The 3 combined Factions should have enough votes to get these Senators elected and remain in power for a while.

b) Once elected, they decide amongst themselves who will be Rome Consul (run the Phase from this point on) and who will be the Field Consul (go fight the first War).

c) If you have a crisis, you can elect a Dictator who simultaneously becomes the guy who runs the Phase and typically goes to fight the War. Most likely you won't be able to do this in the first round unless 1st Punic War got activated as described above. In the future, you need 3 Active Wars or a single War totaling 20 Strength (and 1stPW would qualify as it has both 10 Land and Fleet for a total of 20 Strength).

d) Then you elect a Censor who must have Consul or Dictator experience. At this point, only the Temporary Rome Consul has it so he is automatically appointed (so now your 3 factions all have a position of power!)

1b) Prosecutions
The final step of elections is the Censor doing prosecutions. At this point in the game, he will only be able to prosecute those who are Corrupt - who took Concessions from Phase 2 Revenue. Since this is a minor offense, the Censor can make two Prosecutions. But since you don't want to upset the balance at this time, you can often just threaten that if they contribute to the Treasury (to support the defense of a War), you won't prosecute and you'll be a big hero.

First Game Tip wrote:
I have heard that 5 players make an ideal game. What happens is the 2 most powerful factions join together and then take on the weakest other Faction that gets them their solid majority. But this junior partner is always dissatisfied from taking the scraps and will quickly join with the other two outside Factions to form a new triumvirate. In this way, the game remains dynamic and mistrustful.

If you are the Temp RC, you can form this first coalition by securing votes while promising the Consul positions to your new allies. And since you will become Censor (barring a mortality Chit draw as the game starts) you can continue your manipulation of things by threatening with Prosecutions. So the Temp RC can position himself right if he plays it cool.

If a Dictator is not warranted, you will want to make sure that the Field Consul is the Senator with the highest Military Rating. If you will have a Dictator, then the 2 highest Military Ratings should be reserved for this office and his Master of Horse and the FC should be the 3rd highest rated Military officer. The Rome Consul should have a high Military rating as well as he could potentially go to War. It is more important for him to have a high Popularity (to influence the State of the Republic speech) but in the early rounds, most Senators will be at 0 POP.
2) Appoint Governors
You won't have any open Provinces at the start of the Early Era and won't see them until the Wars start getting defeated; so you can skip this. But basically it is a way to get rid of more powerful Senators to reduce that Faction's vote total (since they temporarily leave Rome and the Senate). But it is also a way to get money and Influence so it isn't all bad.

3) Other Business
This everything else. In the early game, it will be distributing Concessions that are sitting face-up in the Forum. Raising Troops and sending them to War. You can do these in any order. You can bundle up like types (such as 2 Concessions to get more votes that way). If you ever send the HRAO to war, however, the Senate round closes and you move along to the next Phase.

During all this, the HRAO (typically your Rome Consul) is in complete control. He makes the nominations, he limits the discussions, he calls the votes in any order he wants. To prevent him from just giving himself stuff, if he is ever unanimously defeated in a vote by all other players, he can lose Influence or has to step down in controlling the Phase (but still retains his office). Also, other players can play the powerful Tribune card to either Veto a Proposal put forward by the HRAO or to make their own proposals. If they interrupt to propose something, it will follow after the current vote.

You can also Assassinate Senators at this time which might change the voting blocs. But that isn't recommended for the Early Era game, especially in the early rounds. You need every man possible and don’t want to isolate yourself so quickly.

There is a lot more in here but that explains why it is the heart of the game as well. This should get you going in the right direction and covers most of what you need for the first few rounds. This section of the rulebook is pretty detailed as well, but I think is presented better, without all the tangents.

First Game Tip wrote:
With other business, you’ll want to dole out all the Concessions. This is a way to gain support for other measures and return favors for those voting with you. The most pressing business is dealing with the Wars. If you ignore them, then the game will be over quickly and all players lose. Even if 1st Punic War is not Active, consider fighting it. You will need to raise more than the 4 Legions you started the game with and Fleets will need to be raised to both support your Legions in the Land War and for the Naval Battle. Consider the cost of raising the Unit (10T) and the maintenance of it (2T @) in future rounds.
Board Game: The Republic of Rome

Image by wellspokenman

Combat
Here you resolve all the Wars you prepared for during the Senate Phase. This is another “easy” phase that is somewhat complicated by all the potential outcomes and things to check for.

Each War is fought in order that it was "voted" on. If they have a Fleet (number >0 next to the ship icon), you have to defeat the Naval Battle first. Then you can try to fight the Land Battle (if you have enough Fleets left over to meet or exceed the number next to the anchor icon).

Battles are abstract and fairly simple. It is your total Strength (number of units) + your Commander's Military rating - the Strength of the enemy (which might be enhanced by a Leader or Matching War). This gives you a drm (die roll modifier) which you add to a 3d6 and compare on the chart. It will tell you if you Won, Lost, or tied. It will also tell you how many units you lost. You can lose Legions in the Naval Battle and Fleets in the Land Battle. So you might consider sending out just the Fleet to fight Naval Battles until you win, and then send in the Legions. Once won, a Naval Battle is always one (and so marked by a Naval Victory marker). If you do not win the Land Battle, the enemy’s Strength is unaffected – it remains its printed value (plus any modifiers from Leaders or Matching Wars). That’s the basic concept, now the details…

A commander will lose 1 Popularity for every 2 Legions lost (Fleets do not count in this Popularity loss). In addition, you have to draw a Mortality Chit for each Unit lost to see if the Commander dies as well. If the Commander dies, the Units remain until the next Senate Phase when they may either be recalled or sent a new Commander to continue the War. If insufficient Fleets remain to give Fleet Support, Units are automatically recalled to Rome. Otherwise, the Commander (who now receives a Proconsul marker) and surviving Unit stay on the War card. If he is victorious, he likewise stays put and has the option to come home during the next Phase as a Rebel. One surviving Legion may become a Veteran unit by flipping him over and giving the corresponding Allegiance marker to the Commander. This unit now counts as 2 when calculating Strength for Rome.

There are 3 possible outcomes to a War: Victory, Stalemate, or Defeat. Victory lowers the Unrest Level by 1, and eliminates the War card. If no other Matching Wars are in play, any Leader is also removed to the Curia. Units may still be lost and Popularity adjusted while Mortality Chits are resolved. But then the victorious Commander will gain Influence and Popularity. The State also gains the spoils of War for Land Battles. Stalemate means the war is undecided. The normal things are resolved and the Units remain until next turn. Defeat means that Rome lost the War and Units are destroyed as normal but the Commander is automatically killed. The Unrest level is increased by 2.

In addition, there are 2 further possibilities: Standoff or Disaster. There are auto-fail numbers on the war and Leader cards if you roll that exact number (before modifiers) on the 3d6. If you roll that number, without modifiers, you do the Standoff or Disaster resolution instead, which is losing ¼ or ½, respectively, of all units. Popularity loses still take place and the normal amount of Mortality Chits are still drawn. Surviving Commanders and Units remain until next turn. In addition, a Disaster raises the Unrest Level by 1.

Wars not fought this round (i.e., they are no Units or Naval Victory markers on it) are moved down to the Unprosecuted Wars section and will increase the Unrest Level next Population Phase.

First Game Tip wrote:
So let’s return to the 1st Punic War as an example. Say we drew Hamilcar during the Forum Phase. That would have activated 1stPW. 1stPW has a printed land Strength of 10, which is now 13 because of Hamilcar. Likewise, its printed Fleet strength of 10 goes up to 13. The Fleet Support of 5 remains at 5 since Leaders do not effect this number.

Because this War was made Active during the Forum Phase and has a combined Strength of 26, the Co-consuls appointed Flaminius (MIL of 4) as Dictator, who in turn appointed Julius (MIL of 4 also)as his Master of Horse. The Senate approved 19 Units to be raised for 190T: 9 Legions and 10 Fleets. The Senate decides to send Flaminius, along with Julius and 13 Legions and 10 Fleets (the Units just built along with the 4 that started the game)

Since 1stPW has a navy, a Naval Battle must be fought. The drm of this Naval Battle would be: 10 (Fleets) + 8 (MIL rating of both Flaminius and Julius) - 13 (the Strength of the War + Leader) = +5 drm. Flaminius would then roll 3d6 and say he rolled a 3 – 2 – 5 = 10. His total would then be 10 + 5(drm) = 15. Looking that up on the table results in a Victory but a loss of 3 Legions and 3 Fleets. Even though this is a Naval Battle, the Legions were sent with the Unit and so must lose the 3 Legions as prescribed. Because 3 Legions were lost, Flaminius loses 1 Popularity (3/2 = 1.5 rounds down to 1). Since he is at 0, he drops to -1 POP.

In addition, 6 Units were lost so 6 Mortality Chits are drawn. If any correspond to the Commander or his Master of Horse, they are immediately killed. If the Chit that kills them is the last drawn, they are instead captured. So say 4-22-11-7-28-14 are drawn. 14 corresponds to Julius but since it was the last one drawn, he is captured instead of killed. The remaining Roman force is Flaminius, 10 Legions and 7 Fleets. Since the minimum Fleet Support requirement of 5 is met, the Land Battle may now be fought.

The drm of this Land Battle would be 10 (Legions) + 4 (MIL rating of Flaminius) – 13 (the Strength of the War + Leader) = +1 drm. Flaminius would then roll 3d6 and say he rolled a 4 – 2 – 4 = 10. His total would then be 10 + 1(drm) = 11. Looking that up on the table results in a Stalemate and a loss of 2 Legions and 2 Fleets. Even though the modified result equals 11, which is a Standoff number, it is ignored because this was not the natural unmodified role. Flaminius would lose another Popularity point and draw 4 more Mortality Chits. He is left with 8 Legions and 5 Fleets, enough to meet the minimum Support number so he is not automatically recalled. Julius is still captured and not killed since the war was not yet defeated. Rome will have to continue this next turn.
Revolution
This is more housekeeping and most of this section’s text is ignored when there is no Rebel, or potential for a Rebel.

1) You can now trade, play, or discard cards from your hand until you get at 5 or below.
2) Victorious Commanders can revolt and March on Rome or voluntarily relinquish command and return peacefully. This is unlikely to happen in the Early Era, especially in the first rounds.
3) The rest of the round is resolving Rebel Senators which we can skip for now.
4) Finally, check for Victory or Fail conditions. If not, start a new round.

5. Detail of Cards
To be posted later once cards are approved through the Admins.
Family Senators
Statesmen Senators
Wars
Leaders

6. End of Game
The game will end in one of several ways:
1) If the Senate must pay for anything at Any Time and does not have enough money, the game ends and all players lose (unless a Rebel is in play and can survive until the end of the 7. Revolution Phase).
2) If the Era Ends card is revealed towards the end of the deck, the game ends at the end of the 3. Forum Phase. The Faction with the most Influence wins.
3) If the People Revolt at the end of the 4. Population Phase, the game ends and all players lose (unless a Rebel is in play and can survive until the end of the 7. Revolution Phase).
4) If there are 4 or more Active Wars at the end of the 6. Combat Phase, the game ends and all players lose (unless a Rebel is in play and can defeat enough Wars to get the total below 4).
5) At the end of the 7. Revolution Phase any conditions are met:
. a. A Rebel Senator Marches on Rome and defeats the Senate Army and reduces the number of Active Wars to less than 4; the Rebel Wins
. b. The Senate goes Bankrupt or the People Revolt, the Rebel automatically wins. If there are 4 or more Active Wars, the Rebel must defeat them with his Forces or he loses as well.
. c. A non-Rebel senator is appointed/elected Consul for Life, he wins.

That is it. Hopefully this will give you a better understanding of the game of the Republic of Rome. You should be able to jump into the game and better understand the rules. If you have any constructive criticism to make this better, please let me know.
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A minor comment on:


You must take this money and it will give you a Corrupt marker for the turn

I think you just slide the card to view Corrupt text.
(Markers are for Governors?)

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brian
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eker wrote:
You must take this money and it will give you a Corrupt marker for the turn

I think you just slide the card to view Corrupt text.
(Markers are for Governors?)
You could do it either way. I am still playing PBEM games with the AH version so I mistyped that, I will correct it.
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Thank YOU Brian.

I planned on springing this on my group this upcoming weekend, and this is invaluable. You should have added 2 or 3 paragraphs of opinions to the end and called it a review.

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Good work Brian!
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Nice work.
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Brian... this is so full of awesome sauce my eyes are watering. Thanks for your effort with this! It's appreciated in many quarters... and fifths even.

Oh... the U.S. Tax Code sucks compared to the VG rulebook for RoR. Really.
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Laudable effort - I'm working on a similar project to make this game more accessible. Stay tuned. ;)
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Great article! I am just learning the game and this really helped me understand the flow of the game. Man, these rules are even worse than those of Blackbeard shake
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This is great stuff, thanks for writing it ColtsFan76... and thanks also to your many helpful comments in other threads of the Republic of Rome forums here. It is much appreciated.
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David Treetop
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Brian,

This summary looks great, now to find new players that will read it...

I really appreciate the effort!

Wilsoros
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Excellent writeup!!

Next to come: Arkham Horror rules explained?
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chooche wrote:
Excellent writeup!!

Next to come: Arkham Horror rules explained?
Actually, I have a snippet of that in a thread somewhere...

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/article/2142810#2142810
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well done this is a great overview, I am linking it to new players as I type
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Just wanted to say thanks for writing this. I have now played the game twice and found this rules summary incredibly useful in understanding the game.
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Kick Butt description. Very nice job.

Observation: seems like for the card draw phase a fairly straightforward if-this-then-this reference could be created. Similar to what you outlined in conversational style.

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Hey! That tickles!
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You've actually increased the value of this game. Well done.

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Superb job, thanks a lot for your effort. kiss
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ColtsFan76 wrote:
It is not meant as a substitute for the actual rules (which can be found here: Living Rules)
I've seen a referrence to Living Rules version 2.xx but have only seen the one you linked to here. Is there really a newer one than the one listed above?

(I'm trying to talk myself out of this game but so far it isn't working)
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brian
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Hugin wrote:
ColtsFan76 wrote:
It is not meant as a substitute for the actual rules (which can be found here: Living Rules)
I've seen a referrence to Living Rules version 2.xx but have only seen the one you linked to here. Is there really a newer one than the one listed above?

(I'm trying to talk myself out of this game but so far it isn't working)
I believe the LR 2.X is the Avalon Hill version of the game. The one I reference and you linked to is the latest public file of the Valley Games version.
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Thanks for clearing that up for me so quickly, Brian.
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Brilliant, I've had this for months and can't work it out from the rules
Thanks
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My oratory rating wasn't high enough to overcome my loyalty, and thus I bought the game last night.
...
Unrest went down by a whopping 3!

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Brian,

when will you finish this section :

5. Detail of Cards
To be posted later once cards are approved through the Admins.
Family Senators
Statesmen Senators
Wars
Leaders

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I will try to get to it soon. I will need to regather my thoughts on where I left off!
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