Daniel
United States
Santee
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This game is ridiculously accessible. I have tried and failed many times in the past to get into other wargames but for one reason or another set it aside for a few days and come back to it completely lost and not knowing where to begin. I think part of what makes CoH:SoS shine is the broken up manner of game play. You move one unit or group of units with an activation, and simply track the actions you take with that unit(s) on the point tracking board. Each individual move is then followed by a counter move from your opponent. This breaks it up and keeps both players involved while simplifying the actions you must take at any one moment, In traditional UGO-IGO wargames, usually one must move their entire force on their side of the playing field and this can be overwhelming for someone who is learning how to simply move and/or fire their units.

I mentioned that I played this solo scenario TWICE! It was about 3 hours for the first run of getting through the first section of programmed rules and to play the scenario and the second time around it took me about less than an hour. The second scenario I went into the Section 2 rules of the rulebook which introduce shared activations and group actions (such as using two adjacent units to both fire at a target). This all went very smoothly and I can definitely say that I am sold on this system! If you are looking for an accessible wargame I can only tell you that this was the system I had been looking for. The rules beyond section 2 do go into more complicated rules for airplanes, vehicles, elevation/line of sight, etc. but after playing through the first two sections of rules I feel confident that I will be able to master those rules as well. The rules are full-color, well illustrated with examples of play, and designer notes that help explain the designers thoughts on why certain rules work a certain way. It is well done and is a shining example to other wargames of what a rulebook should be like.

FF1 begins with three German Panzergrenadiers in a corn field to the South of a village with Russian infantry scattered throughout the buildings. The Russians have a Maxim machine gun, several rifle squads, and a submachine gun squad sitting right on top of the objective stone building that the Germans must attempt to reach.

On the second attempt at this scenario I attempted to incorporate the shared activation rules in section 2 of the rulebook. I took the center panzergrenadier unit and moved it to the right to hook up the other grenadier unit. In the corn field the Germans were shot at several times and hit, but the Germans were able to rally back. I love the elegant way this game handles combat resolution. Simply add up the FirePower value of the firing unit, roll 2D6, and add up to 2 CAPs (you receive a fixed amount at the beginning of each turn to ration out) to reach an Attack Value number which is then compared to the target units Defense Value. If it equals to or is greater than the DV, a hit is scored and a hit counter is drawn randomly that details how seriously they are wounded on the underside of the counter (could be instant kill, suppressed, panicked, etc.) (EX: A Russian squad opens fire at a German out in the open. Its nominal firepower value is 4, is modified by two CAPs thus making this value increase by 2 to a 6. A roll of 2D6 is then added to these two numbers to get the final AV. The roll results in a 7. 7+4+2=13 which is greater than the German DV of 12. The German must now take a hit counter.

In two plays of FF1, the last being played with German variable AP rules (Action points being the currency that activated units use to take actions) and shared activation/ group action rules from section 2, I have won both handily. The Germans have lost 1 panzergrenadier in each game but have wiped out the Russian forces. The Russians are more numerous and have a short range but very powerful unit in the SMG unit and also have a Machine Gun unit, but the Germans are better units having greater firepower and range values and decreased AP costs to firing. Its not exactly a fair fight in the solo game, because for the most part the artificial player's Russian units are unable to move, allowing the Germans to simply out-manoeuvre them.

I will most definitely be supporting this system. If you've been looking for an accessible game that clearly explains the rules, and have any prior exposure to basic wargame rules at all, this is going to be right up your alley. I was about to give up on wargames as too unnecessarily complicated. I gave this game a try and this is it!
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike E.
United States
Lorton
Virginia
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice post, Daniel. I have CoH: Awakening the Bear and am considering purchasing S of S. My understanding is that S of S has some new, revised rules, but that these rules can be used to play A the B, is that true? Since I'm considering buying S of S, I thought I'd download the S of S rules to play with A the B, and if I liked it, then I'd go ahead and buy S of S. Thanks for any reply.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Roger Taylor
United States
Unspecified
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Mike31 wrote:
My understanding is that S of S has some new, revised rules, but that these rules can be used to play A the B, is that true?

Yes.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel
United States
Santee
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I haven't played AtB, SoS is my introduction to the system. I bought SoS for that very reason: it has the updated rules. I think that AtB has been updated to include the new rules.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.