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Subject: American winter attrition rss

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Michael Lessard
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According to rules, American suffer Winter Attrition regardless of their location. I'm wondering why American suffer over the Winter Attrition line and not British ? Is it due to a historical fact ? Or simply to balance the game ?





 
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Michael Vinarcik
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I believe it's to reflect men returning home to work their fields and such; they aren't casualties as much as desertions/non-reenlistments.

I believe the designer's notes indicate this mechanic counteracts larger-than-historical American armies floating around in WtP.
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Brien Martin
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jarjar26 wrote:
According to rules, American suffer Winter Attrition regardless of their location. I'm wondering why American suffer over the Winter Attrition line and not British ? Is it due to a historical fact ? Or simply to balance the game ?


It's because the Continental Army suffered in winters from a number of things:

1) Enlistments usually ran for a calendar year, so many enlistments in the early years of the war ran out December 31. That's why Washington's march on Trenton was so critical, and why it happened on Christmas.

2) Lack of supplies, especially warm coats, shoes, gloves, etc. Many soldiers, weakened by poor diet (food stuffs were also in short supply due to fraud, profiteering, and just plain lack of food in some areas), died from exposure and other winter-time ailments (such as flu, which may not have been "discovered" in the 18th Century).

3) Winters, based on diaries, letters, and newspapers of the time, were pretty brutal during the war, snow in some areas reached 5-6 feet in depth over the course of a few weeks. It was just the cycle of weather at that time, but that cycle just happened to occur during war.

It didn't matter where you encamped if you were on the rebel's side. Lack of food, warm clothing, and crowded and squalid camp conditions quite simply made wintering with Washington a dangerous and deadly proposition.

Brien
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Brien Martin wrote:
jarjar26 wrote:
According to rules, American suffer Winter Attrition regardless of their location. I'm wondering why American suffer over the Winter Attrition line and not British ? Is it due to a historical fact ? Or simply to balance the game ?


It's because the Continental Army suffered in winters from a number of things:

1) Enlistments usually ran for a calendar year, so many enlistments in the early years of the war ran out December 31. That's why Washington's march on Trenton was so critical, and why it happened on Christmas.

2) Lack of supplies, especially warm coats, shoes, gloves, etc. Many soldiers, weakened by poor diet (food stuffs were also in short supply due to fraud, profiteering, and just plain lack of food in some areas), died from exposure and other winter-time ailments (such as flu, which may not have been "discovered" in the 18th Century).

3) Winters, based on diaries, letters, and newspapers of the time, were pretty brutal during the war, snow in some areas reached 5-6 feet in depth over the course of a few weeks. It was just the cycle of weather at that time, but that cycle just happened to occur during war.

It didn't matter where you encamped if you were on the rebel's side. Lack of food, warm clothing, and crowded and squalid camp conditions quite simply made wintering with Washington a dangerous and deadly proposition.

Brien


Your main 3 points are correct;

But, those wintering directly with Washington in the game are immune to all that.

Geo Wash and others wrote endlessly about their troops melting away as winter approached and at the end of the years.

----------

Consider this - British troops were not at home - they were stuck on foreign soil with what amounted to a draft.

American Army was both at home, and needed to go home; and it was cheaper for them to go home during the winter than to have the Congress house them and feed them.

 
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Joel Toppen
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The ability of Washington's Army to avoid winter attrition models George Washington's greatest contribution to the Revolution: The holding together of the Continental Army under enormous difficulties.

-Joel
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Brien Martin
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Wilhammer wrote:
But, those wintering directly with Washington in the game are immune to all that.


Agreed. I let my desire to turn a nifty alliterative phrase overlook that phrase was not in keeping with the rules.

Brien
 
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Brian Morris
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I think the attrition rules are a great example of how the game simulates the actual historical events. There seems to be a trend in wargaming where wargames are becoming stronger historical simulations. In the 1970s there were very few wargames that took into account non military events outside of a random events chart or something of that nature. They mainly dealt with just the military issues of a battle or campaign. Today when you look at games like Washington's War, Unhappy King Charles! and Here I Stand you don't just move troops around but get the full monty i.e. military, political and social aspects all together. I just wish I had had these games when I was younger and could play more.
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