Recommend
7 
 Thumb up
 Hide
16 Posts

Washington's War» Forums » Strategy

Subject: How are people using the ability to drop off strength on the march? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Sean McCormick
United States
Philadelphia
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm curious to see how much use this particular tactic is getting. It's a tried and true way of pacifying large areas on other CDGs, but with the winter attrition model, it seems like a pretty dangerous way of attempting to conquer territory. For the price of a 2 or 3 ops card, you might well be better off simply placing PC markers rather than going on campaign.

Thoughts? Is dropping a trail of 1 strength armies an act of desperation, or are there ways people are making the tactic work?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bartow Riggs
United States
Antelope
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
A CU doesn't flip a PC marker unless A General is present.

Or am I misunderstanding your question?

edit: It takes an army and that is defined as a General _and_ a CU.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joel Toppen
United States
Gallup
New Mexico
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Preorder Navajo Wars by GMT Games
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Remember that CUs do NOT place PC markers at the end of a turn. 1CU units (without a General) are sitting ducks and can be overrun without a battle.

For the Americans, if you drop off 1CU units, they'll just get swallowed up by the roving British Armies via overrun. For the British, it's much worse: not only will you deplete your finite manpower but you will create a situation whereby the Americans will gain steps on the French Alliance Track--all via overrun. Finally, the desertion rule makes this a risky tactic.

That said, from time to time it will be helpful to drop off a CU to maintain a line of communications pursuant to avoiding isolation or inflicting isolation.

-Joel
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean McCormick
United States
Philadelphia
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Ah. For some reason, I was reading it as a CU having the power to flip a PC marker by itself. I guess that pretty much answers that.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Fred Schachter
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
In our WASHINGTON'S WAR playings the most frequent use of this approach is when one of the players drops off 1 CU pieces within context of a Campaign Card where the first Army deposits them to cut-off possible retreat of an enemy Army and then the next Army to move makes the attack and, if that attack is successful, compels a surrender.

One cannot retreat to a space occupied by an enemy CU, even if friendly flagged.

Of course if you're the American, you can see it coming and attempt an Interception (if permitted). For the British, too bad... it can be like watching the "Tholian Web" get spun (for you Star Trek fans). One can only await the blow and hope the King's luck holds.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sam Butler
United States
Fort Walton Beach
Florida
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
You use the tactic on the last card play generally so you don't get overrun. Half the time for the Americans, you might as well drop off 2 units instead of 1, and get the sure bet, unless you are moving Washington. (If you drop off 1 unit and end with an even number, you might as well drop off 2 and end with an odd number, after winter attrition the results are the same but you get a definite flip instead of a 50/50 flip.)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Herman
United States
New York
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The breadcrumb strategy that was used in WTP is no longer viable. Not only do you open yourself up to overrun and attrition, but if the British do it the French are almost guaranteed to enter play. This Saturday a British player tried to use this tactic and the American player initiated a series of lopsided battles that swiftly got the French into the game.

Mark
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tanks Alot
United States
Fort Mill
South Carolina
flag msg tools
badge
go2 Youtube Historical Gaming
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
as long as you use it as the last play of the card turn or out of reach of the Americans you will be ok.
Drop the markers in a daisy chain action. At the beginning of the next turn have the general go pick them back up. I used this as the last play of the game to win as the British once.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean McCormick
United States
Philadelphia
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
charlescab wrote:
as long as you use it as the last play of the card turn or out of reach of the Americans you will be ok.
Drop the markers in a daisy chain action. At the beginning of the next turn have the general go pick them back up. I used this as the last play of the game to win as the British once.


Well, you might be able to do that south of the attrition line, but north of the line and you are likely going to lose half your strength in the attempt.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brien Martin
United States
DeKalb
Illinois
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I would use them in areas where the British were stymied on PC placement and unlikely to waste their limited military on picking the 1 CU off. Especially if I wanted to place PCs to "fill up" an area to prevent any further incursion of British influence. In that way, the PCs have a CU to trace to.

And, hey, with the seven generals at your disposal, it shouldn't be too hard to find a winter quarters to occupy with the general and 1 CU.

Brien
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Herman
United States
New York
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
charlescab wrote:
as long as you use it as the last play of the card turn or out of reach of the Americans you will be ok.
Drop the markers in a daisy chain action. At the beginning of the next turn have the general go pick them back up. I used this as the last play of the game to win as the British once.


Winter attrition is a 50% chance of elimination for a 1CU, so if you drop two you lose one on average. As the British only get 29 SPs for the game, I would be happy to see the British do this. As for the Americans each SP is a 1OC worth of activity, so since you cannot gain territory and you have to go first to get them back, giving up a key American advantage, I think this is a theoretical concept that will not hold up so well in actual game play. However, give it a try and let us know how well it works.

Mark
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Herman
United States
New York
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Brien Martin wrote:
I would use them in areas where the British were stymied on PC placement and unlikely to waste their limited military on picking the 1 CU off. Especially if I wanted to place PCs to "fill up" an area to prevent any further incursion of British influence. In that way, the PCs have a CU to trace to.

And, hey, with the seven generals at your disposal, it shouldn't be too hard to find a winter quarters to occupy with the general and 1 CU.

Brien


Remember, a CU can prevent isolation, so they are useful for that purpose except that winter attrition comes before Political control, so they may not be there when you need them. I know you know this, but for the others reading this, you cannot convert a space with a CU, you need an army which is a General with a CU.

The key for the Americans is the value of 1CU armies.

Mark
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tanks Alot
United States
Fort Mill
South Carolina
flag msg tools
badge
go2 Youtube Historical Gaming
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yes it was in the south so I was safe from winter attrition.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Herman
United States
New York
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
charlescab wrote:
Yes it was in the south so I was safe from winter attrition.


This is true for the British, but not for the Americans.

Mark
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sam Butler
United States
Fort Walton Beach
Florida
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I would also add that sometimes it is worth dropping off TWO markers as the Americans because the net effect is no difference except ensuring your cut-off tactic to either sever political influence or to preserve political influence.

If you are playing the Americans, and moving any general with units other than Washington, and you are tempted to drop off 1 unit, reducing your total from an odd number to an even number (e.g., 5 to 4), then you should instead leave TWO units there, reducing your total from 5 to 3 *always*. Why should you leave 2 units instead of 1? Because 2 units will attrit to 1 but will force the political influence, rather than leaving it up to a 50/50 chance of not getting the political influence. There is virtually no drawback, because as the Americans (and not Washington's 5 units) the primary unit will attrit down to the same final strength anyway.

If you're still with me, here's the argument. Let's say it is the final phase of the turn, and you move a non-Washington American general (e.g., Greene) and want to drop off unit(s) on the way to possibly gain political favor. Just to put a number to it to simplify the example, let's say the army starts at a strength of 5.

Your two choices are as follows:

(1) Leave 1 unit behind. This leaves a 50/50 chance of political benefit, which as Joel, Mark, and others said is the reason to use this tactic. Your primary unit is now strength 4 prior to attrition, but since American non-Washington generals attrit by half, your strength of the primary unit is further reduced down to 2. SUMMARY: 50% chance of political gain, final Greene army strength is 2, and 50% chance of final left-behind unit strength is 1.

(2) Leave 2 units behind. This guarantees political benefit, as the unit will attrit down to 1 (but has no chance of being eliminated prior to political gain). Your primary unit is now strength 3 before attrition. After attrition, the unit is further reduced down to a strength of 2. SUMMARY: Guaranteed political gain, final Greene army strength is 2, final left-behind unit strength is 1.

There is no added drawback to choice #2, and there is an added benefit, so I would state that with a non-Washington American general that has an odd starting strength, if you want to leave unit(s) behind, you should *always* leave 2 units behind without exception.

(All of this is assuming you don't expect an attack from your opponent of course, but generally you leave units behind on your last turn so your opponent won't overrun them anyway before the political benefit is reaped.)
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
jay white
Canada
Bowen Island
British Columbia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sam,

I think you're missing the key point that Mark and Joel have brought up... you don't get a PC marker at the end of a turn just for having a CU on a space. You need a General AND a CU on the space (which is called an army).

I played this game twice and didn't especially enjoy it, but just realized that both times I misplayed that rule. Gotta go back and give it another shot! I think this will make a huge difference. Our map was filling with PC markers very quickly, and armies were used more for dropping-off to convert a space than anything else.

I suspect playing the game correctly will be a lot more fun. :)
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.