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Subject: Zeddemore Format: by far my favorite way to play Magic rss

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Seth Brown
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Keep the drafting fun going throughout the game, and get rid of the unfun of mana screw and mana flood.

That was our goal in coming up with Zeddemore Format, which as you might guess from the name if you are a Ghostbusters fan, was inspired by the Winston Draft format.

Zeddemore Format has a setup similar to Winston Draft, and this post is now updated with the final version of the rules:

SETTING UP THE ZED DECK
1) You take your pile of draftable cards (basically any cube you have sitting around. Can be random cards, or your full set of Kamagawa, or your reject rare pile, or whatever -- the only real rule is that it is ideally somewhat balanced in color. Any cube draft set works well.) and set it aside as your Zeddemore cube. Keeping your Zeddemore cube in its own box naturally works great. Bigger is better; you'll want a cube large enough to know it won't run out mid-game, and ideally enough to support a few games in a row.

2) Take a equal color mix of (mostly basic) land roughly 1/3 the size of your Zeddemore cube, and shuffle it into those cards to create your Zeddemore deck. This should give you a Zed deck that is roughly 1/4 land. The more cards in your Zed deck, the more games you can play in a row.
If you are short on land (or just enjoy a giant Zed cube like we do), just sort out the land after each game, and after the deck runs out, you can just repeat this second step to shuffle that land back into the next chunk of untried cards from the larger Zed cube to make your Zed deck for the next few games.

STARTING THE GAME
3) Take two of each basic land, shuffle them together, and deal each player three land as a starting hand. Remove the rest of that small land pile, unrevealed, from the game.

4) Take the top three cards of the Zed deck and make three separate one-card piles, a la Winston Draft.

5) Now, do three rounds of drafting just like Winston Draft, with the big difference that whatever cards you draft go DIRECTLY INTO YOUR HAND.

(An explanation; skip this paragraph if you are familiar with Winston Draft.) When it is your turn to draft a card, there are three piles in front of you containing at least one card. Pick up the first pile, and look at it. If you like it, put the entire pile into your hand, and replace the pile you took with the top card from the Zedmore deck; your draw is over. If you do not like the pile, replace it face-down, and add the top card of the deck to it without looking. In this case, you may then look at the second pile and do the same thing. Again, if you pass, add a card to the pile and look at the next pile. If you choose to pass on the third pile, you must add a card to it and then draw the top card of the deck into your hand.

6) After the last player has drafted her third round of cards, she immediately starts the game by taking her turn with her current hand, skipping her draw phase. The standard hand limit of 7 cards is applied at the end of your turn. From then on, when the turn passes, at the beginning of your turn, during your draw phase, you draft one Zeddemore pile using the rules explained above. (If a card instructs you to draw a card, you just draw a card, do not draft.)

We've been playing this with a shared graveyard, which leads to occasional wackiness but is pretty dang fun.

IMPORTANT RULES
* Whenever a card instructs you to "draw a card", you must draw the top card of the Zeddemore deck. You may not draft a pile; you only draft as a replacement for your draw phase.

* If a card would search your whole deck, just look at the top 10 cards of the deck.


ADVANTAGES
* You'll be drafting all game, not just at the beginning.

* You are guaranteed to start with 3 mana, and sometimes more if you make that a focus.

* Every draw phase, you have four chances to find something useful, thus decreasing the chances of dead draws.

SUGGESTIONS
* If you have a lot of cards, put together a dedicated Zeddemore set.

- I like to keep out cards that seem annoying in the format, which includes many cards that involve excessive deck manipulation. I like to add a few cards that have cantrips, some color hate, and other cards only good in certain circumstances.

- I highly recommend adding cards that have small effects, especially the cards that everyone hates in regular draft formats, such as +1/+1 until end of turn, or healing salve. These will be passed over as single-card piles, picked up in a multi-card pile along with other cards, and end up being pivotal later in the game. There's no better way to get use out of those cards in your collection you thought you'd never use.

- Cards with heavy single-color costs (e.g. WWW4, RR3, etc.) are recommended, as they make hunting for mana remain an interesting option even after you have domain.

IF YOU TRY THIS
Post here and let me know what you think. I've played it a lot with the co-creator Tom Stackpole, but I'd be curious to hear other people's thoughts.
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Chris May
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Re: Zedmore Format: by far my favorite way to play Magic
This seems like a very cool format. I love winston draft, but sometimes the deckbuilding part can take a while. This seems to be like the best combination of pack wars and winston.

I look forward to trying it if I can get a chance to.


Edit: for grammar
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Re: Zedmore Format: by far my favorite way to play Magic
I like the idea but think I'd struggle to find folk to play it with. Definitely something I'll remember, though, in case the opportunity arises.

It sounds vaguely like Dominion in that you're drafting and playing simultaneously.

I'm guessing that a 'Zed deck' would benefit from some variance in the cards' power level?

My only concern is that the mixture of every basic land would make for a fair amount of unreliability in terms of drawing the mana you need.

To lessen the impact of that, I suppose most cards shouldn't need too much coloured mana and that some black spells, rewarding numerous swamps, are right out of the question. Am I correct?

Lastly, what's your take on multicoloured or hybrid cards?
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Re: Zedmore Format: by far my favorite way to play Magic
Osirus wrote:

* You are guaranteed to start with 4 mana, and can almost always guarantee another mana draw when you need one.

* Once you have as much mana as you want, you never need to draw mana again.


Perhaps I'm wrong, but this seems to remove a lot of decision making from the players.

Since a player will always get what they want (land or spell), in particular if they have previously seen a pile from the winston draft the exact question/answer to the current board position.

Decisions of whether to use a removal spell or keep it for a greater threat would be reduced, due to the fact that you increased the chance of 'drawing' removal due to the elimination of possibly drawing lands.

Mana-screw and mana-flood happen occasionally, but if you're consistently finding this happening to you, then either you've built your deck wrong or have made a poor mulligan decision. Both of which are vital if you want to become a better player.
 
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Re: Zedmore Format: by far my favorite way to play Magic
Jangus wrote:
Osirus wrote:

* You are guaranteed to start with 4 mana, and can almost always guarantee another mana draw when you need one.

* Once you have as much mana as you want, you never need to draw mana again.


Perhaps I'm wrong, but this seems to remove a lot of decision making from the players.

Since a player will always get what they want (land or spell), in particular if they have previously seen a pile from the winston draft the exact question/answer to the current board position.

Decisions of whether to use a removal spell or keep it for a greater threat would be reduced, due to the fact that you increased the chance of 'drawing' removal due to the elimination of possibly drawing lands.

Mana-screw and mana-flood happen occasionally, but if you're consistently finding this happening to you, then either you've built your deck wrong or have made a poor mulligan decision. Both of which are vital if you want to become a better player.



I think the decisions are just different. It definitely sounds like the normal skills like mulliganing and deckbuilding have no place in this format. However, quick thinking and changing tactics are the draw for me. One minute you could be trying a white/blue control deck and then you draw a green bomb and redraw your mana accordingly. Sounds fun to me.

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Seth Brown
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Re: Zedmore Format: by far my favorite way to play Magic
Bezman wrote:
I'm guessing that a 'Zed deck' would benefit from some variance in the cards' power level?

My only concern is that the mixture of every basic land would make for a fair amount of unreliability in terms of drawing the mana you need.

To lessen the impact of that, I suppose most cards shouldn't need too much coloured mana and that some black spells, rewarding numerous swamps, are right out of the question. Am I correct?

Lastly, what's your take on multicoloured or hybrid cards?


Variance is definitely good. I really think it's a format where bad cards can shine, and when a pile of 4 bad cards build up, suddenly it can be very tempting to replenish your hand. On the other hand, Armadillo Cloak is Armadillo Cloak.

I actually enjoy putting in multi-colored cards and cards with heavy (2 or 3, obviously not 4 of a single one) color commitment. If you've got 5-6 mana out, you want some cards that encourage players to keep digging in the mana deck so they can cast ANYTHING. But by the same token, they could be more choosey with what they draft and skip the color-heavy cards, and not waste time drawing mana.

Hybrid cards (and artifacts) are always handy. We've found Mourning Thrull to be a high early pick.

Chrisgmay wrote:
Jangus wrote:

Perhaps I'm wrong, but this seems to remove a lot of decision making from the players since a player will always get what they want. Mana-screw and mana-flood happen occasionally, but if you're consistently finding this happening to you, then either you've built your deck wrong or have made a poor mulligan decision. Both of which are vital if you want to become a better player.


I think the decisions are just different. It definitely sounds like the normal skills like mulliganing and deckbuilding have no place in this format. However, quick thinking and changing tactics are the draw for me.


That's about the size of it. Obviously this format changes the nature of the game quite a bit by removing the whole deckbuilding aspect. Rather than making lots of strategic decisions up front about what to put in your deck, you make a somewhat more tactical decision at the beginning of each turn in terms of what you draw. Obviously there's still some strategy, but it does shift the game more towards the tactical.

I imagine some people will enjoy this more than standard magic, some will enjoy it less, and some will probably find it a pleasant change of pace for the occasional game but not in general. That's about what I hope for from a variant, and naturally an oddball variant like this does not improve your tournament skills as much as regular play would.
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Matt Lernout
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Re: Zedmore Format: by far my favorite way to play Magic

Ray, when someone asks you if you're a god, you say "YES"!

Edit: Oh, and it's Zeddemore, to nitpick.
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Seth Brown
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Thanks! I tend to know how to pronounce or spell things, but not both.
 
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Eric O. LEBIGOT
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We tried this variant yesterday for a 3-player game, and I would like to give some feedback. But before doing this, I'd like to thank you for posting it!

Here is how I would summarize our feelings:

* Pros:
- Richer tactical play. In fact, the choice between 3+1 drafting piles allows players to find tactical answers to the current board situation.
- Quicker "set-up" since there is no deck construction phase.

* Cons:
- The game did not flow as smoothly as our games with constructed decks, because we had to pause each time we would get a pile of cards, study them, go to the next pile, etc. Maybe the game would flow faster, if we knew all the cards.
- We estimated that the time saved by not constructing a deck from drafted cards was smaller than the time lost by deciding which cards to draft, even on a single game. And since we usually play many games with a single constructed deck, we found the usual Winston draft to be faster.
- The pleasure of using sideboard cards to tune our constructed decks in-between games disappears.

* Neutral:
- What would be the variant rule for "Search your library"? Maybe search the 3 piles?

* Conclusion: we may try this variant when we know all the cards very well, with the hope that this variant will then be faster than regular Winston. However, I encourage players to try it, because it's a very small investment that may well pay off for you, as it did with Seth!
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Seth Brown
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lebigot wrote:

* Pros:
- Richer tactical play. In fact, the choice between 3+1 drafting piles allows players to find tactical answers to the current board situation.
- Quicker "set-up" since there is no deck construction phase.

Definitely two of my favorite pros.


lebigot wrote:

* Cons:
- The game did not flow as smoothly as our games with constructed decks, because we had to pause each time we would get a pile of cards, study them, go to the next pile, etc. Maybe the game would flow faster, if we knew all the cards.
- We estimated that the time saved by not constructing a deck from drafted cards was smaller than the time lost by deciding which cards to draft, even on a single game. And since we usually play many games with a single constructed deck, we found the usual Winston draft to be faster.


I tend to play with a bunch of cards I've set aside, a la Cube Draft, which does mean people aren't reading a bunch of new cards. (also, it allows you to tailor the card pool to the format a bit.) Last week I actually played my first Zeddemore Format game with fresh packs, and it definitely slowed us down. Using cards everyone knows speeds things up noticeably, and then which format is faster probably depends on how many games you'd play with the same Winston decks. For a single game, Zeddemore is much faster. For a dozen games with the same decks, Winston will be much faster. I don't know where the break point is.

lebigot wrote:
- The pleasure of using sideboard cards to tune our constructed decks in-between games disappears.


Yeah, the thing that makes Zeddemore so bizarre is that it removes the entire strategic deck-construction portion of Magic, and replaces it with the tactical every-turn draft.

lebigot wrote:
* Neutral:
- What would be the variant rule for "Search your library"? Maybe search the 3 piles?


I've always played that your library is your personal land deck. This makes the landsearch cards work fine, but I've removed all the spell-searching cards from my Winston set. I play a pretty casual game, so if a card comes up that would be broken in the format, I just tell my opponent the situation and ask if it's cool to remove it from the game (and cardpool) and draw to replace it.

(With mostly useless cards due to format, I tend to just suck it up and remove them from the cardpool after the game. Besides, there's a good chance that they'll show up in a pile, in which case people will pass them over anyway.)


lebigot wrote:
* Conclusion: we may try this variant when we know all the cards very well, with the hope that this variant will then be faster than regular Winston. However, I encourage players to try it, because it's a very small investment that may well pay off for you, as it did with Seth!


Thanks for giving it a shot!
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ingame Winston. Brilliant. Will try soon.
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Jason Dulay
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Any suggestions on what cards to put in the Zeddemore deck? Cube M10 probably?
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Hi.

I've played Zeddemore 6 times now: 1,2 and 3 times against 3 opponents (all 2-player games).

Thanks for the variant! I wish I could bump this thread up more - it totally deserves to be seen by more folk.

Night 1, at a 'gaming club' night, I took a box of commons/uncommons (mostly Shadowmoor/Eventide with some Lorwyn and some xth edition) and tried to talk someone into playing the game. They were a better drafter than I am (top-rated in the club) and was only free to play because there was no draft that night. His superior skill shined through and he won 2 of 2. Toil to Renown was used to spectacular effect, turning the tables when he was on around 3 life.

I then played a casual player who also beat me. I tried to use toil to renown myself and even played it a 2nd time thanks to recursion but all I managed to do was delay my defeat.

I decided to introduce J, a relative novice to the format. I taught him how to play and he had only played 4-5 games previously - with decks I had constructed. The issue is that in constructed, deck-building seems to be a large part of the game so giving him my decks makes for a less satisfying experience. This seemed a great answer, letting us play without prior time investment or purchase on his part. We've now played 3 games over 2 nights and will probably play the format again.

At this point, my reaction was favourable. In fact, I increased my MtG rating from 8.9ish to 10, based on this format, after playing it 5 times.

Although there is still luck (potentially in what new spells you encounter when drafting and the lands drawn), it is far less aggravating than normal magic. The land/spell split eliminates frustration and means you should always be able to cast at least one spell every turn.

It seemed skill intensive - probably on a par with booster draft, which pros say is the most skill-intensive format.

It definitely seemed to allow for a lot of variation compared to constructed. Many people in the gaming group who play magic only have one deck and that gets rather boring. Even though I myself have a few decks, I know roughly what cards I'll encounter and how the game will be won - if I win. In zeddemore, I never know what spells I'll be casting. My first 4 lands dictate my plan somewhat and some spells are strong enough to force you down a certain path. It really feels like venturing into the unknown.

I love the fact that it can be played like a boardgame. Although I do have a big advantage over J, knowing the cards far better (and being better at Magic playing in blocking/timing decisions), there's no worry about one deck being better than another. Now I've made a big pile of cards, I could play tens of games - all without worrying about relative power level.

Games do take longer than constructed but seem qualitatively far superior. Of course, time taken depends largely on familiarity with the cards. My first opponent played at the speed I'd play constructed at, whilst J struggles to compute the possibilities available, since he'd often have a large hand and be drafting a pile of a few spells, requiring him to think about a large number of cards in tandem. He would play constructed slowly, too, though and I'm sure he'll speed up as his skill improves.

Relative to a night spent playing booster drafts, it seems that 3 matches of Zeddemore would take about the same time. 4 matches of Zeddemore would probably take longer than a 4-match booster draft evening. Of course, I'm just guessing. You need to consider the hour spent drafting compared to the extra time that each turn takes in Zeddemore.

Though 'downtime' is longer, I find that I have more to think about in Zeddemore - not only how to cast my spells in hand etc. but also the 'simple' decision of whether to draft or draw a land.

In a way, the lack of a handicap system in MtG becomes obvious. I worry that eventually, J is going to be disheartened as I may win far more. This is the reason I will probably reduce my score although it will remain within my top 5 thanks to Zeddemore.

Finally, our last game was played with an alteration. I went through the 'cube', removed the lone spell that required 3 mana of one colour and changed the rules defining the land deck: we used 2 of each basic land.

I definitely prefer this new change. You're extremely unlikely to draw 10 lands. Previously, drawing 3 of one type felt rather annoying - having more colours available seemed far superior. Having only 2 of each land removes this 'random annoyance'.

And since you won't draft all your land, chances are good that you'll be valuing spells differently to your opponent. In the 'test' game, I ended up with 4 lands in my deck - 2 islands, 1 forest and 1 plains. Though tempted to draw an island (50% chance) to play a flier, I decided to not risk it and instead try to get some other creatures.

Anyway, thanks again for this format. I may report back in a few months or whenever I have new opinions.
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Seth Brown
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Behrooz -- glad you enjoyed it so much. I can totally understand wanting to cut down the land deck to 10 to make it easier to draw different colors. Though as you mention, players having different land bases is a nice way to make drafting more interesting, and my fear is that if domain is too easy to come by, land bases will start to look too similar. Will have to try it out though.

Personally, I went with 3 of each land to make domain less likely, and keep a bit of the unknown element where you may go through a whole game unable to draw a swamp even after a half-dozen land draws. For me, the agony of deciding whether to dig for land to cast the great spell you have in your hand, or just draft new spells for the colors of land you have, is a large element of the fun, just like the situation with the islands you mention. But that's the great thing about variants; you can alter them to however you most enjoy them.

(Also, I enjoy putting powerful color-intensive cards in the draft, so you can see them and wonder to yourself, "It's turn 4 and nobody has more than one green mana on the table; how do I feel about Blastoderm?")
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The island situation happened with 2 of each land though so you needn't worry that you'll have all 5 colours easily with 2 of each type.

Sure, after drawing land for 5 turns, you'll be guaranteed at least one of each colour. However, I kind of feel that after forfeiting the draft (seems the stronger option) for turns, that's not a bad thing.

You're certainly not going to have access to 2 of each colour unless you draw lands for 6 turns. Since I find games ending at a 'normal rate' (turn 6 or 7), that's just not realistic. So spells with 2 mana of a single colour required are still going to sometimes be dead cards to you and there will be variation in how players value the cards.

I think that the possibility of drawing 5 lands (after the initial 4) and only having 3 colours is worse than the certainty of having all 5 colours after drawing 5. One reduces randomness and variation (which is already present thanks to the drafting), the other has the potential for real frustration.

I suppose I'm just advocating cutting out the frustrating swinginess - finishing the work you seem to have mostly already done.

Definitely let me know what you think after you try it out and let us all know if you disover any other tweaks!
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A friend and I played a couple games of this two-player this past Sunday. It was a lot of fun, though I still prefer vanilla Winston. My friend on the other hand said that he liked Zeddemore much better than Winston, because a standard draft "takes too long". Each of us won one game.

We went with your original 15 card personal land deck, and used my Peasant (common/uncommon only) cube as a gigantic Zeddemore deck. I didn't go through it at all to check if all the cards worked in Zeddemore. A couple little observations:

The card Brainstorm is interesting in this format. Not under or over powered, just plays very differently. Here, it gives you three cards from the Zeddemore deck, then you put two on your personal land deck. This gives you the decision in the future to either draw a card you know you're going to get, or draft. The downside to it is that it clogs up your ability to draw mana, putting those two spells (if you had no lands in hand like I did at the time) on top of your land deck.

Another thing, this time something that we had to rule on the fly, was a card involving Clash. Gilt-Leaf Ambush I think it was. We knew it wouldn't work too well from the personal decks, since they're land most of the time, so we wound up both just pulling a card from the middle of the Zeddemore deck, then sticking it back in the middle. Next time it comes up we'll do something a little more structured, having each clashing player, starting with the player who cast the card involving Clash, draw and reveal the top card of the Zeddemore deck, then after both cards have been revealed, again starting with the player who cast it, deciding to put it back on top of the Zeddemore deck or on the bottom. Kind of a long-winded explanation, I hope it's clear.

All in all fun and different, and we'll be playing this format again!
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Pardon the dumb question from a non-Magic player, is this variant for 2-player only or for multi-player? Would it work multi-player do you think?

(My interest is in playing Harry Potter TCG with my 2 kids without deck building. I think HP might be similar to MTG because it has lesson cards which are analagous to lands I believe?). Thanks

Edit: In HP you lose when your draw pile runs out. A deck is always 60 cards. So this would need to be modified.
 
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manukajoe wrote:


(My interest is in playing Harry Potter TCG with my 2 kids without deck building. I think HP might be similar to MTG because it has lesson cards which are analagous to lands I believe?). Thanks

Edit: In HP you lose when your draw pile runs out. A deck is always 60 cards. So this would need to be modified.


HP TCG is very similiar to Magic, the major difference being that it uses decking instead of life loss as it's primary game win method.
 
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manukajoe wrote:
Pardon the dumb question from a non-Magic player, is this variant for 2-player only or for multi-player? Would it work multi-player do you think?

(My interest is in playing Harry Potter TCG with my 2 kids without deck building. I think HP might be similar to MTG because it has lesson cards which are analagous to lands I believe?). Thanks

Edit: In HP you lose when your draw pile runs out. A deck is always 60 cards. So this would need to be modified.


Absolutely works multi-player. (Haven't played HP, but sounds like it wouldn't work for HP without serious changes.)
 
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Osirus wrote:
manukajoe wrote:
Pardon the dumb question from a non-Magic player, is this variant for 2-player only or for multi-player? Would it work multi-player do you think?

(My interest is in playing Harry Potter TCG with my 2 kids without deck building. I think HP might be similar to MTG because it has lesson cards which are analagous to lands I believe?). Thanks

Edit: In HP you lose when your draw pile runs out. A deck is always 60 cards. So this would need to be modified.


Absolutely works multi-player. (Haven't played HP, but sounds like it wouldn't work for HP without serious changes.)


Would someone mind summarising the multi-player rules (both melee and attack left). Thanks.
 
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manukajoe wrote:

Would someone mind summarising the multi-player rules (both melee and attack left). Thanks.


Games are just the same except you may either attack a single opponent of your choice, split your attacking creatures between one or more opponents or may attack only the opponent to your left.

Most multiplayer games end when only one player is alive. Some play a 3-player 'attack left' game and stop when the first person loses - the person to their right winning.

Different folk will advocate different rules but the most important thing is that they are agreed-upon before you play.
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I made another small change that you may like to try.

Essentially, instead of drawing lands, then taking turns to draft, players take turns to either draft or draw until they have done so 7 times, then the game begins.

(Like Seth's original rules play/draw applies: The 2nd person to play both gets to draft first and also keeps the initiative in card advantage.)

I like this since it lets you draft a different number of lands if you wish. Or you could time picking up lands to let yourself pick up a pile of multiple cards.

I suppose 4 is a pretty good number though and 4 lands/3 drafts does simplify the process slightly.
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Seth Brown
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Update from the front:

The Bone Dancer and I recently tried playing with two small modifications.

1) Rather than each player having a personal land deck, a large central land deck is created, with 2/3rds basic lands (equal numbers of each type), and 1/3 non-basic lands. You still choose on your turn whether to draft from the Zed piles, or draw the top card of the land deck.

2) We played that for search cards, you can choose which deck you search, but you may only search the top 10 cards. This both opens space for search cards to be included, and prevents you from having to search a giant deck. After a game or two, we also decided that if your search came up empty with no valid targets (e.g., searching for an enchantment), you could look at the next 10 cards. But if there's only one valid target, that's what you get.

The single land deck mixed with non-basics did add more festivity into the game. The downside, obviously, is power variance off of a top-deck draw. But the change had enough upsides to more than compensate, in our opinion. First and foremost, it's just more fun to draw land from a bigger deck that contains non-basics as well as basics. The inclusion of lots of hamstrung dual lands (pain, comes into play tapped, etc.) also mitigate a bad opening land draw. And it just seems more in the Zed spirit to play from a shared land deck.

As for the change to searching, it worked fine. A demonic tutor from the top 10 cards of the Zed deck is surprisingly potent. That being said, it's probably easier just not to have cards that search your library in the format, if you're using a cube.
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Justus
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any thoughts of incorporationg a winchester draft? It a variant of the winston draft with the drafted cards facing up. Here's an explaination of it here
http://69.8.198.251/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtg/daily/....

(For the record, I haven't played any of these, but I have very little room for error so I like to optimize my game system or else the GF might not be interested trying it a second time)
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Seth Brown
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This post now contains the earlier version of Zeddemore Draft, for reference. The original post is now updated with the final version.
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1) You take your pile of draft cards (certainly doesn't have to be from fresh packs, but ideally somewhat balanced in color. If you have a cube draft set, this works well.) and make a big Zeddemore deck in the center of the table. Don't restrict yourself to 45 cards per player if not playing with boosters; there's no downside to having a larger pile.

2) Take the top three cards of this deck and make three separate one-card piles, a la Winston Draft.

Then the different part:
3) Each player takes 3 of each basic land, and shuffles them together to form a personal land deck. Each player draws the top four cards of his personal land deck to form his hand.

edit: now improved!
3) Shuffle together ten of each basic land, and any number of non-basics. Players take turns drawing from the top of the land deck until each player has four cards.

4) Now, do three rounds of drafting just like Winston Draft, with the big difference that whatever cards you draft go DIRECTLY INTO YOUR HAND.

(An explanation; skip this paragraph if you are familiar with Winston Draft.) When it is your turn to draft a card, there are three piles in front of you containing at least one card. Pick up the first pile, and look at it. If you like it, put the entire pile into your hand, and replace the pile you took with the top card from the Zedmore deck; your draw is over. If you do not like the pile, replace it face-down, and add the top card of the deck to it without looking. In this case, you may then look at the second pile and do the same thing. Again, if you pass, add a card to the pile and look at the next pile. If you choose to pass on the third pile, you must add a card to it and then draw the top card of the deck into your hand.


5) After the last person has drafted her third round of cards, she immediately starts the game by taking her turn with her current hand, skipping her draw phase. The standard hand limit of 7 cards is applied at the end of your turn. From then on, when the turn passes, if you are the next player you have two choices during your draw phase:

a) Draw the top card of your personal land deck
a) Draw the top card of the land deck
OR
b) Draft one Zeddemore pile using the rules explained above.

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