GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters at year's end: 1000!
9,871 Supporters
$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
15 Days Left

Support:

Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Do You Worship Cthulhu?» Forums » General

Subject: Isn't this really a RPG? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Aleksander R. Nordgarden Rødner
Norway
Oslo
Oslo
flag msg tools
designer
Proud father of Sarah Arwen and Ruth Rose
badge
Would really like to study U.S. History at some point, just to be able to say that I'm a Coolidge student...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
First off, the only components here are the cards. Second of all, the game revolves around arguing about who gets lynched, making it very much like a LARP in a box.

To me, at any rate, this is definitely a RPG.

Thoughts?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Johan Rising
Sweden
flag msg tools
Quote:
First off, the only components here are the cards. Second of all, the game revolves around arguing about who gets lynched, making it very much like a LARP in a box.


It's definitely a very social game, just like most party games. I mean; Apples to Apples is also just a bunch of cards, and the gameplay experience is really about the social dynamics between the players.

But I think it would be a mistake to label all social games as Roleplaying Games because they're really quite different. First of all, in a roleplaying game you're playing a character - not a set of abilities. In Do you Worship Cthulhu (as in Werewolf and other Werewolf-type games) you might get assigned a special ability of some kind, but you're still yourself and everyone expect you to play the best you can. The game would break down completely if the players would start to actually roleplay, like pretending to be stupid villagers, casting votes willy-nilly, or something like that.

Secondly, roleplaying games are about storytelling. They don't just have a setting and a premise, but tools for the players to tell different narratives each time they play. In "Do You Worship Cthulhu", you can't say "hey, moderator; Me, Jonas and Eliza decide to take matters in our own hands during the night. We go out, armed with shotguns, and kill everyone else in their sleep." If it had been a roleplaying game, that would've been fine.

The difference in this regard is, that roleplaying games are designed with the goal of being flexible (even if it comes with the price of being arbitrary, overly complex or vague) whereas boardgames are designed to be clear and unanimous (even if it comes with the price of being rigid, limited and samey).

So... no. Werewolf is definitely a social game, it has very few components, it's closely related to many partygames, etc. but it's quite different from the vast majority of roleplaying games.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Aleksander R. Nordgarden Rødner
Norway
Oslo
Oslo
flag msg tools
designer
Proud father of Sarah Arwen and Ruth Rose
badge
Would really like to study U.S. History at some point, just to be able to say that I'm a Coolidge student...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Good and valid points.

I guess it really depends on the group. I've played it with a few different groups, all of them gamers that are into RPGs. With them, it all becomes about creating personas and suggesting ideas for the other folk's characters. I really liked it as a LARP, and am thinking of doing something based on it in the future.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Apocryphal Lore
Canada
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Rising wrote:
you can't say "hey, moderator; Me, Jonas and Eliza decide to take matters in our own hands during the night. We go out, armed with shotguns, and kill everyone else in their sleep." If it had been a roleplaying game, that would've been fine.


This statement bothers me and intrigues me, makes me nervous and makes me laugh. I'm not sure how I feel about it but I think I'm amused.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.