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A Game of Thrones: The Card Game» Forums » General

Subject: Extremely new to CCG/LCG rss

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Shane Ryan
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So new that the idea that decks can be modified for "control", "rush", "aggro", etc. reminds me of WoW the MMO. Does anyone have some sort of website for deck building for the completely ignorant? It would have to be as basic as it can get since I do not know what the terms mean in relation to the cards, nor would I know which kind of cards (and at what ratio) would help to achieve one of those terms.

Any help is appreciated.
 
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Jason -
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This might help with deck building basics: http://boardgamegeek.com/article/4905798#4905798
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Shane Ryan
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Thanks for that link.
 
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Nate Parkes
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LashtonBryth wrote:
So new that the idea that decks can be modified for "control", "rush", "aggro", etc. reminds me of WoW the MMO. Does anyone have some sort of website for deck building for the completely ignorant? It would have to be as basic as it can get since I do not know what the terms mean in relation to the cards, nor would I know which kind of cards (and at what ratio) would help to achieve one of those terms.

Any help is appreciated.


I can describe those basic archetypes for you, and which houses they're associated with:

Control - Lannister:

Control, at its heart, simply means having the ability to manipulate your opponent's board (the cards he has in play), in order to shut down your opponet's strategy and leave him or her defenseless.

The clearest example of this I can think of is Lannister. Lannister is very powerful in both intrigue challenges and kneel effects. Lannister wins by forcing an opponent to discard his hand and by kneeling his characters. With no cards in hand to marshal, and no standing characters to play, there's not much an opponent can do to keep a Lannister from rolling over him with undefended challenges and accumulating 15 power to win.

Generally, I think control is a mid-to-long game strategy. One of the strongest advantages of the control player is stamina. If the game is still going during the sixth or seventh round, the control player will have a strong board and a full hand, while his opponent will have an empty hand and few options.

Rush - Baratheon:

A player running a Rush deck seeks to win the game before his or her opponent can establish a significant board presence. It's not uncommon for a successful Rush deck to win by turn two.

The clearest examples of Rush decks will come from house Baratheon. Several key characters in Baratheon have the "renown" keyword which allows them to accumulate power on their cards for winning challenges. Combine this with some events or abilities which allow characters to engage in multiple challenges per round, and a Rush deck will accumulate power at an incredible rate.

Rush is a short-game strategy, and this is both its strength and its weakness. If a Rush deck works, the player will win before his or her opponent has even had a chance to get a decent board presence. But if a Rush player is countered and the game goes long, he or she will may run out of gas very fast.

Aggro - Stark:

A player running an aggro deck seeks to win by establishing a strong military presence and then constantly killing his or her opponent's characters. The aggro player wins by putting his or her opponent on the defensive, killing the key component of the opponent's strategy, and then gradually accumulating power through a variety of ways.

Stark is the house most associated with Aggro, because it has some of the best examples of an Aggro deck's most important features: the "Deadly" keyword and directed kills. In Game of Thrones, even if you win a military challenge against an oppoent, your opponent still gets to select who is killed for claim. But with the Deadly keyword, you can force your opponent to kill one of the defenders, and with a directed kill, you can target almost any character on the board.

It should be noted that Aggro in A Game of Thrones is slower than Aggro in Magic the Gathering. In Magic, you win by killing your opponent--by making attackers that bypass or roll over his defenders and chip away at his HP. In Magic, an Aggro deck can win very quickly. In Game of Thrones, you can only win by accumulating 15 power, so even if you devastate your opponent's board, you won't necessarily be any closer to winning (though you'll be in a stronger board position). That's why Aggro is a medium-length strategy. Also, because it often relies on having more characters in play than your opponent, it can be more vulnerable to resets (aka Valar Morghulis) than other decks.
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