Jason Johns
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Our game is titled “Sherman Comes South”, but it’s probably more appropriately named “Turtle Races or How I Went Slower than McClellan”. Neither my opponent nor I are known for our fast and aggressive offensive style of play. In fact, we’re known for quite the opposite. I will posit that Pepper has even a bit more of a case of the “slows” than I do, but risky offensive thrusts are not our forte. We’ve played games PBEM for the past 10 years or so. He’s one of my standard opponents. I think this cautious behavior was reinforced with one of our first games, Paths of Glory. There it seemed that you were fighting to not lose rather than to win. This has kinda spilled over into the rest of our play. Needless to say, this will not be the most riveting replay. But you were warned, so here we go. (This will mostly be from the Union side)

Turn one saw major Union action to get Lyon promoted. Moved a guy to Rolla then over to Springfield, then Lyon moved to attack Price, who retreated. (We’re using the WGA rule set, which has some cool changes, such as leader retreat and the red tape rule, forcing you to use those crappy leaders.) He retreated into Arkansas, but I finally caught him and got ol’ Lyon promoted out. In the East, Lincoln built the AoP (Army of the Potomac) under McDowell in Washington, DC. Finally, the Union moved a guy to take the last space in W Virginia. The Confederates concentrated on getting troops into N Virginia and building up his fort and SPs in Memphis. He also put a few guys out in New Orleans, and along the coast: South Carolina. Missouri & W Virginia converted to Union Blue.

Turn two had a lot of CPs rolled. It saw the creation of the AoC under Rosencrans in Cairo & AoT under Buell? in Indiana for the Union and the AoT under Johnston in Nashville & ANV under the other Johnston or Beauregard(?) in Northern Virgina for the Confederates. The Union just built up his three armies, including beefing up Washington DC to 7 and 2 to Philadelphia with the Ocean going navy. The Confeds built the fortress in Richmond and in Memphis. He built up his armies and put a few more guys out along the coast, Texas, Alabama(?).

Rosencrans, in a brilliant maneuver, moved along the Mississippi in the swamps of Missouri to attack a lone confederate there (a few hexes NW of Memphis). This was to get a truckload of leaders promoted. But alas Thomas’ horse is felled and he is feared dead! (Actually, he was dead, but especially important with the red tape rule, we allow two leaders to reroll one death roll and I used it on him. Third best Union leaders killed … I don’t think so.) So, Sherman, Curtis, Thomas and ? was promoted. Woo hoo. Grant was not. Boo. Hiss. This turn saw us near 20 CPs for the primary theaters, but the turn ended quickly as the 4th set of CP doubles was rolled. Grrrr.

Turn three saw the continual build up of all of the armies. The AoP moved out of Washington two spaces NW to get the 3 SPs stacked there. In addition, Rosie and AoC moved to Paducah, Kentucky, while a lone Union SP moved along the Kentucky rail lines to covert ALMOST all the state. The Confederate AoM was created at Memphis under Van Dorn. The Confederates built up more defenses. Longstreet who had some visions of doing something in the swamps of Missouri, high tailed it out of there to the AoT in Nashville. This turn saw a lot of CPs again. But in an even shorter turn than turn 2, we rolled all four CP Table uses early, ending the turn.

Turn four saw the Union with about 16 reinforcements in the East and West, while the Confeds had near 10 each. This was due to the short turns on 2 & 3. After reinforcing all of the replacement leaders, Rosencrans moved over and killed off Forts Donelson & Henry, promoting all of the two stars. Thereafter, Johnston and AoT come roaring up to hit Rosie, who reacts away. No need to get those 2 stars killed. Johnston tries again, but fails to catch the AoC, and so retires towards Nashville. Meanwhile, the Confederates had surreptitiously built up their strength under Price (?) adjacent to Fort Monroe.

Thereafter, we basically spent quite a few rounds just placing our reinforcements, since we had so many. The Union had two naval CPs left and wanted to invade somewhere, but didn’t want the confederates to be able to react with his remaining CPs. So, I continued to wait. He was down to 1 reinf left, when we got more CPs. That was fine. We each got one point and then we rolled a 7 ending the turn. GRRRRRR!!! That was definitely a tactical mistake on my part. On the plus side, I finally moved a guy to Bowling Green, thus getting Kentucky converted.

So that ended the turn and the AAR.




Below is the Red Tape rule. We also required a leader to have been in combat before he can be “retired” or moved off to some depot. Not a perfect fix, but it helps alleviate the stack of crap leaders sitting on a Texas or Pennsylvania Depot.

6.2.8 Army Subordinate Leader Requirement (the "Red Tape" rule): An Army Commander (AC) has a limit to the number of SP’s and leaders which he may command in combat or overrun, as the attacker. These limits never apply to movement, to the defender in a combat, or to Reaction. An AC may command up to 6 SP’s or subordinate (i.e., lower ranked/lower seniority) leaders. Subordinate leaders command SP’s or lower ranked leaders up to their star rank. Cavalry leaders cannot command other leaders. Uncommanded SP’s are not counted in an attack or overrun, although they would retreat and suffer Demoralization with the entire Army. The Tactical Combat Rating of each leader is used, even for those in excess of the command limit.

EXAMPLE 6.2.8A: McDowell*** forms the Army of the Potomac in Washington DC on turn 1. Although the Army contains 7 SP’s, McDowell can only command 6 SP’s in battle until he adds subordinate leaders. McDowell can however, move and react normally with the entire Army.

EXAMPLE 6.2.8B: Beauregard***, Polk**, and Smith* command the Army of Tennessee with 15 SP’s. Beauregard commands 4 SP’s, Polk** and Smith*; Polk** commands 6 SP’s, and Smith* commands 2 SP’s. Total strength for an attack is therefore 12 SP’s. Without additional leaders (or a promotion), 3 SP’s are uncommanded and thus unavailable for an attack.


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Wendell
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Yellow Springs
Ohio
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Interesting red tape rule. I admit in my games, we end up with one CP in Springfield Illinois guarding a bunch of bad Union generals with orders not to let them near a combat. The good generals are quickly put on a train out of Springfield. Not very realistic!
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Jason Johns
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Yeah, it's working pretty well. I have avoided using the two four strength leaders. I will use them at some time. I used mediocre rather than really crap leaders, as my army leaders. Grant will take over AoT on T 5 though. I had Banks on the stack of 3 guys in Maryland, but since the Confeds are even slower than me... ... he never attacked that stack. Banks has subsequently moved off. whistle The couple of changes the WGA made and a couple of house rules have really made this very good game that much better.
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Dave Turansky
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The Red Tape Rule has been playtested extensively. I think it works so well that I decided to do what was necessary to complete the rules revision project. The finished project includes interpretations of unclear areas that have been decided by a majority of some of the game's leading aficionados.

I recommend that players use the Non-Army Leader Reaction Rules (Section 21.9). If you try those rules, you will never play again without them. Eric Smith has indicated that all leaders should be able to react, not just army leaders. The rule that developed was crafted after multiple games.

Other optional rules I have regularly used include the CSA Supply by River rule (21.1) contributed by Carl Williams, and the Naval rules (21.6) which is an amalgamation of ideas contributed by numerous players. The variant leader system (Rule 22) developed primarily by Kirk Bast has many interesting ideas.

Note that the version which can be downloaded from this site is obsolete. I attempted to update it, but BGG would not accept the update.
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Jason Johns
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DaveTu wrote:
The Red Tape Rule has been playtested extensively. I think it works so well that I decided to do what was necessary to complete the rules revision project. The finished project includes interpretations of unclear areas that have been decided by a majority of some of the game's leading aficionados.

I recommend that players use the Non-Army Leader Reaction Rules (Section 21.9). If you try those rules, you will never play again without them. Eric Smith has indicated that all leaders should be able to react, not just army leaders. The rule that developed was crafted after multiple games.

Other optional rules I have regularly used include the CSA Supply by River rule (21.1) contributed by Carl Williams, and the Naval rules (21.6) which is an amalgamation of ideas contributed by numerous players. The variant leader system (Rule 22) developed primarily by Kirk Bast has many interesting ideas.

Note that the version which can be downloaded from this site is obsolete. I attempted to update it, but BGG would not accept the update.


I have the 4/29 rules, I think. I am using all of your mentioned rules except the new leaders rule. It was just too much for this turn. I'll use it next time.

I really like the non-army leader run away rule. It sure did surprise me when Price ran away from a beefed up Lyon. Price made it to Arkansas, forcing a battle in a mountain/forest. Grrr. This also triggered the Arkansas Militia.

I used the regular army reaction to run the AoC away from the AoT with a bunch of leaders that needed to be promoted. Hee hee. That was fun watching him burn 6 cp for nothing.
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Dave Turansky
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The most recent version of the rules is the one that you have (100430). It is likely to be the final version.

I do not recommend that players try the variant leaders system (Rule 22.0) the first time they play the game. This is a deceptively complex game, and the optional rules should be kept to a minimum at first. I have not used the additional leaders section of the variant leader rules.

I do recommend the non-army leader reaction rule in every game. The reaction capability of non-army leaders is much less than that of army leaders. The rule benefits the Confederacy more, due to their abundance of 2 initiative leaders. When using the rule, the attacker must factor in the possibility of reaction. Previously, any non-army force would always just sit there and take it. Use of this rule encourages the players to parcel out their leaders to more forces. Even a 4 initiative leader has a chance to react.

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Warren Bruhn
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Not sure that "red tape" rule will be enough to solve the problem of many historically important bad leaders getting sidelined. Try my very old "political generals" variant if you want to force them to be used. I'm trying to post it to BoardGameGeek as a PDF, but must wait for admin approval before it shows up in the files section here. In the meantime it's posted as a txt file at Web Grognards:

http://grognard.com/variants/civwar.txt

Under this "red tape" rule it seems like we will be missing many of the historical Union corps commanders who were not included in the game.

Warren
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Jason Johns
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RE: Red Tape rule, there is also a historcal leaders variant. In any case, it definitely fixes a small problem with the game. I'm happy with it.

I also added that before a leader can be moved off to "boggy depot" he needs to be involved in a combat at current rank. Additionally, you have to have one sp per leader. So, that's making it tougher to shuttle those guys away.
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Peter Walsh
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Bethlehem
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Warren Bruhn wrote:
Not sure that "red tape" rule will be enough to solve the problem of many historically important bad leaders getting sidelined.


Having used Red Tape for about six years or so I have to say that it solves the problem of sidelined leaders in a manner that is about as consistent with the concept of the game as you're ever likely to find. A player *will* use poor leaders to command their large armies, but not because of any complicated rules mandating their use - they will use the leaders because it makes sense to do so. The simplicity of the rule is very attractive and it has a powerful effect. I've seen Buell, Banks, Howard, Burnside, Sigel and McClernand all used to good effect in Union armies. The CSA is less hard pressed, but Polk usually has a more active career even if Huger does not.
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Warren Bruhn
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You've got me interested enough to offer to try a FTF game with Keith Todd using "Red Tape." Perhaps we'll get in a game sometime soon.

However, the following rule is definately NOT more complicated than "Red Tape," and it worked quite easilly when I tried it:

"Political Generals"
Give the Conf. 9 vp. The Union may subtract one vp each time one of the
following leaders is used in combat in such a way as to use his dice
addition for the Conf. or give his dice reroll options to modify a combat
die roll:
-not in army command:
Sigel (G)
McClernand (D)
Howard (R)
Fremont (R)
Banks (R)
Butler (R)
-in army command:
McClellan (D)
Buell (D)
Butler (R)
Note: Butler does need to be used twice. When used in army command he may be
moved by a "****" as part of a stack with two or more armies so long as
Butler is in command of one of the armies.
Give the union one vp. The Conf. may subtract this vp when Polk is used in
combat in such a way as to add to the Union combat die roll in a combat.
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Jason Johns
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You are correct Warren. But with Red Tape, you'll have to CONTINUE to use the guys to be able to fight with full strength armies. It's a good rule.

Look up those WGA rules. There are a few good fixes.

P.S. How's your EIA game going? I haven't seen a recent post.
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Warren Bruhn
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We haven't played EiA since early June. Too many weddings, funerals, vacations, work projects, etc. We may be playing on August 28.
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Jason Johns
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Hey Dave, I now only have the 110427 rules not the 110430 rules. Can you send me a copy of the latest ones? I'll PM you. Also, can you try again to upload that latest copy? Thanks.
 
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