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Subject: Auction game idea rss

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Steven Metzger
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Just to quickly write this down, as the idea popped into my head: An auction game where subsequent bids are LOWER, not higher.

Assume some basic set of commodities/things to bid on, where there are (probably) 7 per bidding round. Players bid on these things in turn order, and if you would like to get in on an item that has already been bid on, you bid one increment LESS than the price that the previous bidder gave.

If you ever are forced to bid $0, you may instead TAKE the item. If all players pass consecutively, the round is over and the bids are assessed.

The key is the turn-order mechanics involved, and getting into a fight that you know you cannot win is a foolish thing.

This would be for at least 3 players, and probably better with 4 or more.
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Perry Tan
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The reverse of No, Thanks! I'll call it... Yes, Please!
 
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Wim van Gruisen
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Why would you want to stop bidding?

Idea: items up for bid give negative points.
Or they give positive points if you collect up to three of them, and afterwards negative ones.
Or it is something like Coloretto; the first three colours you collect give positive points, the rest negative ones.

And everyone must get at least one item each auction round. You cannot pass unless you won at least one item.

Perhaps the characteristics of the items up for auction change? If you get it for $7, you may gain $5 extra income. If you get it for $6, you may exchange one card gained for another one in the auction. If you get it for $5, you may discard a card in the current auction and deal a new one. And so on.
Edit: Couple this with one of the "this gives negative points" variants. X can bid on it for the powerful effect and the positive points he gets, and now Y has to choose to bid and get negative points, or to pass and let X get all those bonuses.
 
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Walt
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After the 1974 Northridge Earthquake, a massive section of the extremely busy I-10 needed rebuilding. Cal-Trans estimated 12-18 months to fix it, but the governor put the project up for bid at 140 days: take longer, you get penalties; do it faster, you get bonuses. C.C. Myers was low bidder at $14.9 million.

Just C.C. Myers' payroll was over $1 million a week, but they finished the job in 66 days, 74 days early, for a bonus of $14.8 million and a profit of about $5 million.

More here (2 pages): http://articles.sfgate.com/2007-05-13/news/17245606_1_myers-...

So, that's what comes in to my mind when someone says low bid.
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Wim van Gruisen
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Tall_Walt wrote:
After the 1974 Northridge Earthquake, a massive section of the extremely busy I-10 needed rebuilding. Cal-Trans estimated 12-18 months to fix it, but the governor put the project up for bid at 140 days: take longer, you get penalties; do it faster, you get bonuses. C.C. Myers was low bidder at $14.9 million.

Yeah, if you are in competition to get money (instead of paying money), then bidding low (as in: I will take a lower reward) is standard. But getting rewarded less is equivalent to paying more; in the end you are left with less money.

Edit: I don't mean to imply that your suggestion has little value, or anything. Just that it is a very different direction than what I was thinking of.
In fact, the idea had crossed my mind to make a game about wine production where you'd start with getting a contract auction; whoever asked the lowest reward for producing a set amount and quality of wines would get the contract. And then had to work at fulfilling it.
 
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Steven Metzger
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Whymme wrote:
Why would you want to stop bidding?

Idea: items up for bid give negative points.
Or they give positive points if you collect up to three of them, and afterwards negative ones.
Or it is something like Coloretto; the first three colours you collect give positive points, the rest negative ones.

And everyone must get at least one item each auction round. You cannot pass unless you won at least one item.

Perhaps the characteristics of the items up for auction change? If you get it for $7, you may gain $5 extra income. If you get it for $6, you may exchange one card gained for another one in the auction. If you get it for $5, you may discard a card in the current auction and deal a new one. And so on.
Edit: Couple this with one of the "this gives negative points" variants. X can bid on it for the powerful effect and the positive points he gets, and now Y has to choose to bid and get negative points, or to pass and let X get all those bonuses.
The idea would be that if you continue bidding, and your direct bid opponent has that direct line to a $0 bid (and therefore a free auction win), you would not engage in a continuous bidding war.
 
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Chun Ping
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in that case then there's no need for a bidding cos the second guy always win on a odd starting bid and the first guy always win on even.

if you account for more players, the same logic goes.

i'm not trying to shoot down the idea, but i'm not sure what kind of decision are there.

of cos, may be u have other rules that say you can only win 1 item per round or something. currently without some external factor, there's no real meaning to the bids?

i cant really think of anything right now, so i'm all ears for your solution
 
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Chun Ping
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Whymme wrote:

In fact, the idea had crossed my mind to make a game about wine production where you'd start with getting a contract auction; whoever asked the lowest reward for producing a set amount and quality of wines would get the contract. And then had to work at fulfilling it.


this sounds like a cool idea. some sort of worker placement/building game where you gain money/points by fulfilling your trade contracts? may be le havre style of production?
 
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Martin Boisselle
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In the line of Merchants of Amsterdam?
 
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Wim van Gruisen
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My mention of my idea for a game threatens to hijack this thread. To prevent that I started a [thread=5407388]new thread[/thread] about that idea. Please continue the discussion there and let this thread be about Steve's auction mechanic.
 
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Wim van Gruisen
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cpf86 wrote:
in that case then there's no need for a bidding cos the second guy always win on a odd starting bid and the first guy always win on even.

if you account for more players, the same logic goes.

Not necessarily. Players can pass and so shake up the order.

Or, if you can choose between more than one good to bid at (as Steven intended), you could get some interesting results.

Let's see ... say that there are seven goods up for auction, but only three get sold. A good is sold if someone bids and that bid stays for a round.

When your turn comes up, you can choose between seven goods to bid on. What should influence your decision is not only the price of the goods, but also whether they are close to being sold. Say that your left-hand neighbour put a bid of 6 on good A; if you don't bid 5 on that good, he will get it. Do you want that to happen? Or do you potentially want to pay 5 in order to prevent that?
 
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