Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
23 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Board Game Design » Board Game Design

Subject: A Platformer-inspired board game. Is it possible? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Scott Arnone
United States
Parkville
Maryland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
So, this isn't really a thread where I have any actual ideas, but rather one where I'm just curious to hear some thoughts!

While playing Little Big Planet, I started wondering if it would be at all possible to translate the idea of a Platformer into a board game environment in a way that was actually felt like more than just some generic system with a splash of theme that blatantly just said "This is a Platformer. Cool, huh?".

I suppose you could do some sort of dexterity-based system, but I'm not sure that would actually work very well, or be very fun.

Is the Platformer one of the few game-types that just can't really translate onto the tabletop?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Cookingham
United States
Poughkeepsie
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
If you wanted to go for a game that involved balancing speed vs precision (a common aspect of platformers), then you may want to look at games like Formula D.

Or you can go for the aspect of using spatial awareness to navigate complex routes (and avoid/harm enemies), such as RoboRally.

When I first read about Pressure Matrix, it struck me as a bit like a competitive platformer.

Finally-- you got: Jenga: Donkey Kong Collector's Edition
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
William Towns
United States
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Actually, I owned Super Mario Brothers the boardgame when I was a kid, so not only is it possible, it's been done. I haven't played it in a LOOONG time, but I remember it being quite fun for what it was. It's not going to overload ones strategic juices from what I remember, but that's for the best IMO.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris J Davis
United Kingdom
London
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Overtext pending moderation...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Entropy2k wrote:
Actually, I owned Super Mario Brothers the boardgame when I was a kid, so not only is it possible, it's been done. I haven't played it in a LOOONG time, but I remember it being quite fun for what it was. It's not going to overload ones strategic juices from what I remember, but that's for the best IMO.


How did it work?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
H J

London
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
I own a Donkey Kong boardgame. Comes with little barrels and everything.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Arnone
United States
Parkville
Maryland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Hm. I had a thought.

A board that utilizes stacks of diminishing titles.

If adjacent stacks are the same size, you an simply walk from one to the other.


If adjacent stacks are 1 tile higher or lower, you can jump up/down.

If adjacent stacks are 2 tiles higher, you can't jump up without a special ability of some sort.

If there is a gap between 2 stacks and the stacks are even, you can jump the gap so long as you have a "running start" (2 stacks adjacent to eachother).

If there is a gap and your stack is 2 tiles higher than the target stack, you can jump to it without a running start, as you've got the extra height.

Some special abilities could involve double jumps, wall jumps, and things like that. With perhaps the basis of the game being to destroy the various stacks in such a way as to trap your opponent.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
H J

London
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
Would you need stacks of anything? You could just have tiles of different sizes.

Assuming the game is viewed from above, two tiles of the same a size are adjacent.

A medium sized tile next to a small one means thre's a drop. A medium sized tile next to a big one means there's a jump.

It's all about the perspective.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Arnone
United States
Parkville
Maryland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
HatchetJob wrote:
Would you need stacks of anything? You could just have tiles of different sizes.

Assuming the game is viewed from above, two tiles of the same a size are adjacent.

A medium sized tile next to a small one means thre's a drop. A medium sized tile next to a big one means there's a jump.

It's all about the perspective.


That's a pretty good idea!

I just thought the "stacks" gave it more of a "feel" when viewed from other angles. But the different sized pieces could definitely work and make it all much neater.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Tagmire
United States
Westmont
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
Avatar
mb
How about Pixel Lincoln? It's more of a sidescroller than a platformer though. We advertised it as "possibly the worlds first sidescrolling card game". That may or may not be true.


7 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Arnone
United States
Parkville
Maryland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Ha. That's pretty cool. You would probably appreciate the comic "Time Lincoln"..well, who wouldn't appreciate Lincoln vs Hitler in a fist fight? laugh

Anyway, I had some other thoughts.

A sort of Mirror's Edge type of game. Parkour and rooftops and guys coming after you.

There'd be some sort of system that would allow you to chain moves together--perhaps based on dice rolls or some sort of card system? And you could "stunt" to grab bonuses either to points, or to your move chain.

So, like, you could run along a stretch, jump across a gap, using your momentum to bash a guy, while not breaking stride to then do a Jackie Chan wall jump up to a higher level.

Question would be how to generate the board. If its a constant board, there'd always be a "best path" to follow and it would be pointless as a game. But then random boards leave the possibility of a board that may not be workable.

Hm.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
H J

London
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
I've got it - Mirror's Edge Screwball Scramble!

Godammit I'm good.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Freelance Police
United States
Palo Alto
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Aha.

Players play their guys jumping around *BUT* they also modify the "terrain" where the guys are jumping. Essentially, you have a platform theme, but the mechanics are spatial resource management. You want to modify the board, suchthat your guy gets the best goodies, while your opponents get hit by the bad stuff. You'll probably need some mechanics to break players from the pack.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel Cassar
Australia
Adelaide
South Australia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
HatchetJob wrote:
I've got it - Mirror's Edge Screwball Scramble!

Godammit I'm good.


One of the first things that came to my head when I read the title of the thread was the Mirrors Edge game.

The flash platform game "Age of war 2" could also be fairly easily re-done.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
rizkar
United States
flag msg tools
How about a 3d platformer -- Torres is a great game!

Also don't forget all the snakes and ladders inspired games (some mentioned earlier in this thread).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Arnone
United States
Parkville
Maryland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Hmm.

So, what you'd have is a card or tile based board.

Players would draw the tiles/cards, keeping a hand of 3 or so, and able to choose when/where to play them, allowing them to build a board and assure that at least there is always a "solution".

But then there'd be the choice of, do you make the board easy to traverse, or do you go for set-ups that allow big chains and stunts?

I could see both a competitive and a co-op mode. Competitive could be as simply as trying to out-score your opponent, whereas co-op would be trying to get a package or something from one place to another. Go with a Ravenloft sort of mechanic where the "goal" tile is placed a certain depth into the stack.

Chains would be formed by some sort of gambling dice mechanic, something similar to Zombie Dice and those sorts of games--you can keep pushing and chaining your moves together, but if you end up rolling 3 (or whatever) fumbles, you eat it and lose all points for the chain.

Hm. This might be something I might actually have to work on seriously!

Big question is, should there be enemies and how would be the best way to control them? The built-in AI ala Ravenloft seems like the best way to go about it, really.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
JM Bosch
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
So, I was working on a good handful of my designs tonight, searching BGG for posts about how height/multiple stories are handled in card/tile games, and I stumble on this thread. The ideas tossed out are inspiring, so I got side-tracked, and spent a few hours typing this up. Thoughts? (Sorry about the legnth, I tried to break it up with some basic illustrations from Lackey using random good ol' CoC: CCG cards.)

I'm thinking of two different card games; one about parkour-style traversing of an urban landscape, the other about old-school video game platforming.

In the parkour one, there would be Obstacle Cards, Stunt Cards, and Action Cards. You will also need one die for play, and a token (coin) to represent each player. Players will also need to track a stat called Momentum, so some scratch paper or a counter would be handy. Each player constructs an Obstacles Deck and a Stunts & Actions Deck from the cards provided in the starter set.

I'm imagining a play layout with one Lane per player. Each lane runs horizontal. For set up, every player shuffles their two Decks, then draws 10 Stunts & Actions Cards and 5 Obstacles Cards. This will form their playing Hand. Before play begins, however, each player then draws 5 more Obstacle Cards from their Obstacles Deck, without looking at them, and take turns placing 1 of the 5 face down in one of the Lanes, their own or another player's. Each card is laid down to the right of the previous one, so that when ready for play to begin, the play area consists of a Lane for each player, filled with 5 face-down Obstacle cards, laid from left-to-right:



The markings show where the players will place their token/coin before play begins. When everything's set up, each player draws an Action or Stunt Card and an Obstacle card to add to their hand for the start of the turn. Then they move their token onto the left-most Obstacle card in their Lane. The card is turned over and the players have to deal with the Obstacle card they are on.



Obstacle Cards will be everything from staircases, rooftop jumps, medians/wall barriers to traverse, business park courtyards to cross, etc. or even enemies poised at different locations to stop you (with varying capabilities of doing so). The Obstacle cards will have a Challenge Rating, a Momentum Penalty, and a Height Level. The Challenge Rating is fairly self-explanatory. The Momentum Penalty is how many points of Momentum the player will lose if they fail the Challenge of the Obstacle. The Height Level represents the relative altitude of the Obstacle the player is facing on the card. (The Height Level will be used for Leaps of Faith, more on that later.)

The Challenge a player will face on an Obstacle Card depends on what kind of Obstacle it is. Obstacle Types could be things like Barrier/Wall, Gap, Enemy, Unsure Footing, Trap, etc.; posing Challenges like "Climb the Wall," "Jump the Gap," "Cross the Unsure Footing," "Subdue the Enemy," "Pass the Trap," etc. To succeed in a Challenge, the player must use a die roll to meet or exceed the Obstacle Card's Challenge Rating. This task can be assisted by the playing of a Stunt Card from the player's Hand that is applicable to the Obstacle Type (such as "Wall Run" for Walls/Barriers, "Dive Roll" for Traps, or something similar). These Stunt Cards, when played, allow the player to add a bonus to their die roll (+1/+2/+3) to succeed in the Challenge. Additionally, a player may spend a point of their Momentum to add a +1 bonus to the die roll. A player can spend as much Momentum as they wish, as long as they have it and declare that they are doing so before rolling. However, at the start of the game, each player has 0 Momentum, so this is not an option.

If they succeed in their roll to pass the Challenge, a player gains 1 point of Momentum. If they used one of their applicable Stunt Cards to give them a bonus and succeeded, then they gain additional Momentum equal to a Momentum Rating on the Stunt Card. (More bad ass Stunts gain more Momentum when you pass Challenges with them.) If the player fails the Challenge roll, they lose Momentum equal to the Momentum Penalty on the Obstacle Card. If this would drop their Momentum below 0, it is considered to be 0. The player will not be able to move forward from that Obstacle until they pass its Challenge.

After each player attempts their Obstacle's Challenge for that turn, those that passed turn the next card to the right face-up, allowing them a little fore-sight into what the next turn will hold for them. This also indicates which players will advance to the next Obstacle in their Lane next turn, and which failed their Challenge and must attempt it again next turn.



Each player has a chance, at this point, to play an Action Card from their Hand if they wish, even if they failed their Obstacle's Challenge. They may only play 1 per turn. Action Cards have special moves on them, such as engaging a player in a neighboring Lane, in an attempt to force them to swap Lanes with you. (Decided by a contested die roll. The initiating player can get a +1/+2/+3 bonus to this die roll from the "strength" of the Action Card that calls for it. Another Action Card may allow you to peer ahead, revealing an additional one or two cards in your Lane. Or maybe one can provide you a die roll bonus to a specific Challenge type the next time you face it (like a "buff" for that type of Challenge that stays until you use it). Another possibility could be to "destroy" upcoming Obstacle Cards in your Lane of one Type ("Fire Gun" to "kill" an Enemy Obstacle you haven't faced yet, or "Wrench in Gears" to "disarm" a Trap Obstacle). Action Cards also have a Momentum Rating on them, but this is only used for Leaps of Faith. (Again, explained a bit later.)

Once each player that wishes to has played an Action Card, the players that succeeded at their Challenge this turn all take 3 Obstacle Cards from their Hand, and take turns laying 1 of them face-down in a single stack. Once all applicable players have placed their 3 Obstacle Cards down, that single stack is shuffled and becomes the Lanes Deck. Any player may also discard one Action or Stunt Card from their Hand at this point, if they wish. The addition of Obstacle Cards to the Lane Deck and optional Action/Stunt Discard are the last parts of the turn.

When the next turn starts, each player who passed their last Obstacle's Challenge shifts each card in their Lane left one place. (Picking up their token/coin and placing them back down on the same spot, but atop their next Obstacle Card and Challenge.) Then, they draw a card from the Lane Deck, keeping it face-down, and place it at the far right end of their Lane (where there should be an empty space now). Then, each player draws-up to 10 Stunt & Action Cards and 5 Obstacle Cards in their Hand.


The stack of cards on the right is the Lane Deck, which will be drawn from to fill the empty space in the bottom player's Lane. [I messed up with this picture, as technically the top player failed their Challange, so they shouldn't have been able to add 3 Obstacles to the Lane Deck.]

Then the second turn begins!

A Leap of Faith is a maneuver a player can attempt in place of playing an Action Card. If the next Obstacle in their Lane, that they'll face next turn, has a lower Height Level than the Obstacle they're currently on, they can attempt to Leap OVER it, hopefully landing safely to face the Challenge on the Obstacle card AFTER the one they leapt over on the next turn. The player rolls a die to start the Leap of Faith, and they only have to roll a 3+ to begin the Leap; that's the easy part. The Player will place their token/coin ABOVE the Obstacle in their Lane that they are Leaping over if they succeeded. On the next turn, when the Obstacle Cards in the Lane are shifted left, the "Landing" Obstacle Card is turned over and shifted to the "1st" position in the Lane.

If the landing Obstacle Card's Height Level is equal to the Height Level of the Obstacle Card the player Leapt FROM, the player need only make another 3+ roll to land successfully. If the Height Level is LESS than that of the Obstacle Leapt from, the difference is added to the difficulty of the roll, as it's harder to safely land when you drop a farther distance. (So a Height Level difference of 2 would make it a 5+ roll.)

If the player fails either of the Leap of Faith rolls (to Leap or to Land), they will lose 2 points of Momentum. If they failed the Leap roll, they will still have to face the Challenge of the Obstacle they TRIED to Leap over, but failed, that same turn. If they succeeded the Leap, but failed the Land, they suffer the same -2 Momentum, but still made it Leapt over what would have been their next Challenge, and hence, get to face the Challenge they landed on this turn. However, if, when the Landing Obstacle Card is revealed, its Height Level is equal to or higher than the Obstacle Card Leapt from, the player will loose ALL Momentum, and be forced to face the Challenge of the Obstacle Card they tried to Leap over. (They fail, hit the side of the building they were trying to land on, and fall down to the obstacle they tried to leap over.)

Leap of Faith Example
Both players have passed their Challenges this turn, and are at the Action Phase of the turn.

The Obstacle Card revealed in the top Lane player's 2nd Slot has a lower Height Level than the one they're currently on (and just passed a Challenge at) in Slot 1. They decide to try a Leap of Faith over the 2nd Slot Obstacle, hopefully landing (blind, but) safely on the 3rd Slot Obstacle.


The top Lane player succeeded at their Leap roll, and is now mid-air over the 2nd Slot Obstacle, allowing them to see the 3rd Slot Obstacle that they will be trying to Land on next turn. Luckily, it has a lower Height Level than the Obstacle Leapt from, so the player has a chance to Land successfully. Both players choose 3 Obstacle Cards to add to the Lane Deck, shuffle the Lane Deck, and choose whether to discard a Stunt or Action card. Then, the next turn begins.


The top Lane player succeeded at their Land roll as well, gracefully landing atop what WAS their 3rd Slot Obstacle, making it their 1st Slot Obstacle, and current Challenge for this turn (also gaining +2 Momentum for the successful Leap of Faith). Throughout all of this, the bottom Lane player simply moved on to their next Obstacle Card and Challenge. The empty Slots in both Lanes will be filled by drawing from the Lane Deck as usual.


The victory condition could be to sustain a Momentum of 10 or so for a certain number of turns (with re-shuffling of passed Obstacle Cards to continuously play), or there could be an Objective Card shuffled into the Obstacle Decks near the bottom that the player must reach first. Or players could count how many Obstacles they pass in a row, and the player with the longest Momentum-building Combo after a certain number of turns wins. Similarly, there could be gameplay variants that are more directly competitive, such as where each player directly plays an Obstacle Card from their Hand face-down to fill up empty space in another player's Lane, instead of combining each players' chosen Obstacle Cards into a shuffled deck which is drawn from. Another possibility is where entire "Levels" are constructed before play with a carefully ordered Obstacles Deck that 1 or more players must pass through. Players could make up their own co-operative or more competitive versions of the fairly simple gameplay. (Another random sample additional possible rule: You can "Burn" Action, Stunt, or Obstacle Cards from your Hand when the Obstacle you attempt to Land a Leap of Faith on turns out to be just as tall or taller than the one you Leapt from. Any cards "Burnt" (discarded) in this way will will subtract their Momentum Rating from the Height Level of the Landing Obstacle, for purposes of the Leap of Faith Landing roll; allowing players to somehow complete Leaps of Faith to considerablly taller Obstacles.

To Summarize (tl;dr):

Game Cards:
-Obstacle Cards (Obstacle Type, Challenge Rating, Momentum Penalty, Height Level)
-Stunt Cards (Stunt Type, Momentum Rating)
-Action Cards (Action Text, Momentum Rating)

Player Decks:
-Actions & Stunts Deck
-Obstacles Deck
-Lane Deck (Made up of selected Obstacle Cards from all players' Hands)

Player Hands:
-10 Stunt or Action Cards
-5 Obstacle Cards
Draw up to these numbers at start of a turn.
Discard down to 10 or 9 Stunt or Action Cards at the end of a turn.

Turn Phases
-Movement Phase (Shift revealed Obstacles from 2nd Slot to 1st Slot for players that passed their last Challenge; Shift all over Slots left by 1; fill empty Slots with Cards drawn from the Lane Deck. If Leap of Faith is pending, roll for Landing and shift Slots accordingly. All payers draw up to their Hand limit.)
-Obstacle Phase (Players attempt to pass their current Obstacle's Challenge by rolling a die, possibly playing a Stunt Card from their hand, and possibly spending Momentum for an extra boost.)
-Action Phase (Players who passed their Challenge this turn reveal their Lane's Slot 2 Obstacle. All players may play an Action Card from their Hand if they wish. Players who have revealed their 2nd Slot Obstacle may begin a Leap of Faith instead of playing an Action Card.)
-Preparation Phase (Players that passed their Challenge this turn select which 3 bstacle Cards to add to the Lane Deck, then the Lane Deck is shuffled. Players must discard down to either 9 or 10 Stunt or Action Cards in their hand.)



I'm also seeing a side-scrolling platformer with a similar card-game structure of a left-to-right Lane (Like Pixel Lincoln), but with seperate "Track" Cards that form the ground-level of the Level/Lane, and "Platform" Cards, that are placed above the Track Card, and can be stacked up multiple levels over one Track Card. I'm seeing it more as only 1 Lane, though, and probably co-operative, if multiplayer at all. I don't know, typing out the parkour game idea took longer than I anticipated, so I'll leave the Platformer for tomorrow.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
H J

London
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
What do you, any of you, want players to feel? I see lots of mechanics, but I don't know what emotions they're supposed to elicit.

You are talking about a jumping game after all. Toddlers run and jump to play; people jump for joy, we 'jump' when we get a fright.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
JM Bosch
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I was mostly focusing on a player's vicarious thrill in achieving a long run of successfully and gracefully flying past multiple acrobatic obstacles (and building Momentum), and the risk/pay-off and imaginitive rush of the blind Leaps of Faith to pass over a difficult obstacle you don't have a good card in your hand to deal with. The differences in Height Level will aim to create the feeling of perilously clammering and jumping across tall urban structures.

Maybe I should tie the Height Levels into the mechanics more to help elicit those feelings.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Read the rulebook, plan for all contingencies, and…read the rulebook again.
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Every time I play DungeonQuest, I get a hankerin' for NetHack.

DungeonQuest is a few steps removed from NetHack, but I think boardgame version of NetHack with DungeonQuest as a guide for speed and simplicity could be done.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Confusion Under Fire
United Kingdom
Warrington
Cheshire
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sam and Max wrote:
Aha.

Players play their guys jumping around *BUT* they also modify the "terrain" where the guys are jumping. Essentially, you have a platform theme, but the mechanics are spatial resource management. You want to modify the board, suchthat your guy gets the best goodies, while your opponents get hit by the bad stuff. You'll probably need some mechanics to break players from the pack.


A thumbsup just for your name and ID, ahhh I hear the strains of the theme tune in my head now
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Arnone
United States
Parkville
Maryland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Your idea is definitely interesting, JM. I was thinking of something with cards like that as well, but then I decided I wanted something a little more.. open?

The cards definitely work when you're dealing with a race or something, but I ended up leaning towards a modular board with lots of space to maneuver and goals that could move and change with the course of the game.

The main mechanic of my system uses a pool of dice that I'm just going to call "Endurance" for the moment.

Each player will have somewhere between 5 and 10 d6s in this pool most likely.

The dice are rolled in a risk/reward scenario to pretty much accomplish all the various activities on the board, such as fluid movement, combat, scouting, and other things I probably haven't thought of yet.

Each die has 3 possible results: Fumble, Momentum, & Awareness. At the base levels, a Fumble is a 1, Awareness is a 6, and everything in between is Momentum, but that changes as you attempt to chain moves together or are fighting more opponents.

The center if the idea is chaining--in movement and combat, the goal is to create fluid, awesome chains of actions that make you feel like a total badass. Think Assassin's Creed or Prince of Persia.

Each action in a chain has a Momentum cost which has to be rolled, but as you chain more and more moves together, the chances of you fumbling also increases. When you roll fumbles, that die is considered "exhausted" and removed from your pool until you "Catch your Breath".

However, if you're injured, one or more of your Exhausted dice is "broken" and removed from the pool permanently.

So, with this system you can run along rooftops, jump across gaps, and swing down into the center of a courtyard all on a single turn, if you were lucky/gutsy enough.

Now combat uses the same mechanic, like I mentioned. During your turn, attacks simply become another action you can add to your chain.

For example, you enter an alley and trigger an event that has an enemy emerge from the shadows blocking the other end. You could, without ending your turn, dash down the alley, go into a wall run to slip past the guy, and hit him as you come down behind him, so long as you had enough Momentum and Awareness.

Momentum is used when you do bigger attacks, and Awareness is used to keep track of enemies as you move.

Further, when you are attacked, the same mechanic is used. Say you didn't kill the guy in the alley, and he turns and attacks you. You'd have to roll at least 1 die, and a Fumble would be him hitting you, a Momentum result would be a block, and an Awareness result would allow you to counter and hit him instead. And if you had enough Momentum, and were, lets say, fighting 2 guys, have your counter allow you to throw the first guy into the second.

Beyond that, the system gives you more flexibility. You don't have to just run up to a guy and slug it out. Say you were fighting some huge, heavily armored. You could run forward, hit him, and then retreat back, allowing for the ability to lure enemies into better positions and such.

Right now I'm considering different classes with different power cards available. So, aside from the standard bouncy/fighty assassin, you could have more of an Enforcer, brutish type, who doesn't necessarily wallrun, but has some interesting abilities when it comes to combat.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
JM Bosch
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The system you've laid out is much more open, InkSplat, definitely, and allows the player more direct control over their character and the options available to them.

I'd recommend checking out the thread on a "Dice Pool Difference" mechanic that Incompetent and a few others are trying to tease out over in this thread. Since your design is about runners and endurance, maybe each player could start their dice pool with all of their dice sitting with a 4 showing. When the player needs to perform an action, they can simply "Use" the 4 value showing on one of their dice (lowering its value by 1 to a 3), or choose the risk of re-rolling it and taking the new value; say a 5 and succeed. After that action (say they chose to re-roll), the player has a dice pool with a few 4 dice and one 5 die. For later actions, he can choose to either "Use" one of his 4s (turning it into a 3), his 5 (turning it into a 4), or re-roll one and take the new result.

I haven't thought it through too closely, but then you can tie whatever "endurance drain" or "catching breath" mechanic into either restoring lost dice, or lowering/raising the "held" value of one or more of the dice in the user's pool.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
JM Bosch
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm mostly just spit-balling here, figuring out these rules as I write this, but here's a rough concept for a 2-D Platformer style card game (based somewhat heavily on the parkour idea above)...

A 8/16-bit Platformer-themed card game for 2-3 players.
1-2 players are the actual gamers in the level (called "Player 1" and "Player 2"), the other player (the "Console") is attempting to foil them.

Every turn "Track" Cards are played face-down on the base, ground level, from left-to-right, in one Track. (Maybe how many is determined by how fast the players want to move right, allowing the placement of up to 5 per turn?) Track cards are in their own deck, well shuffled, controlled by neither the Players nor the Console. They are drawn from to place new Track sections. Most Track cards are simple types of ground to provide aesthetic flair and a base to build on, but some have special hazards/effects on them as well (Lava Pit, Enemy Spawner, etc.).

After the Track cards have been placed for that turn face-down, the Console is able to peak at the Track cards and place their own "Platform" cards from their hand above the Track cards. The Track cards have a "Max Height" trait that determines the maximum number of Platform cards that can be placed above it. These Platform cards are also placed face-down.

When all Track and Platform cards for the turn have been placed, the Players are able to begin their movement this turn (that they declared last turn). Say they wanted to move 5 paces this turn, which is why 5 Track cards were drawn, and the Console placed Platform cards above them accordingly. Before moving, any Track or Platform cards that are within 1 card in any of the 8 directions (1 card horizontally, vertically, or diagonally away from) the Player is turned face-up. Some Platform or Track cards have effects that happen On Reveal, such as spawning an Encounter Card or searching the Encounters Deck for a specific Encounter Card to put into play. Encounter cards could be things like Enemies, Pick-Ups, or Traps. Once all necessary cards have been revealed and any On Reveal effects have occurred, the Players are able to start their movement.

Player Movement
Up to 5 Moves per turn. (The number of Track cards played is determined by the highest number of Moves a player dedicates themselves to move next turn.) Move declarations are called at the END of a turn, to be carried out the NEXT turn. This is to simulate a video game platformer player running at quick speed, trying to dodge enemies/obstacles why completing the level as quickly as possible. A Player can move their token in any of the 8 directions. Moving from one Platform or Track card to another Platform or Track card that borders it in any of these 8 directions is considered 1 Move. If there are 2 Players, they each take turns performing 1 Move at a time and resolving any resulting challenges or effects from that Move. Each time a Player moves to a new card, the bordering cards in ll 8 directions are revealed, if they haven't been already, and any On Reveal effects carried out. Players are not limited to right-only movement, but can move freely around what is the current, viewable section of the level that is laid out in the play area. Some Enemies are also capable of moving a limited number of times every turn, and attacking Players in their own or neighboring cards.

Additionally, if the player is on a Platform card that borders a "Gap," they can attempt to jump across that Gap to the other bordering Platform Card.

Example:

4th |
3rd | X X
2nd|XX XX
1st |XX XXX
Slot 123456

If a player is on the 1st, 2nd, or 3rd Platform in Slot 2, and there's no Platform on any of those levels in Slot 3, but there IS one on all of those levels in Slot 4, the Player can attempt a jump to hop over the Gap in Slot 3. (Sound familiar? Hehe.) It could be based on a die roll, though I'm not sure what effects will alter the challenge of the roll. Maybe the number of Moves the player's already made that turn make the roll harder and harder if you're trying to cram many moves into one turn (like Inksplat's concept). Since Platform and Track cards aren't revealed until the Player is within 1 card of them, the player won't know what threat is on the other side of a Gap until they jump. However, if an encounter card spawns with an Enemy or Trap where the player is about to land a jump, some Enemies and Traps are easier to defeat if you encounter them from a jump.

The Jump mechanic could be expanded so that you don't just "jump" over gaps, but are considered "jumping" if you decrease your Platform level in a move as well. (Like dropping from a higher Platform to a Lower one below, or just to the down-right or down-left of you.) Alternatively, there could be a "Movement" deck or "Jumps" deck that Players draw from for each turn, limiting what kinds of jumps they can do to what cards they hold in their hand. (This may be the better option.)

There could be an Objective Track Card shuffled into the Track deck that needs to be reached by the Players safely. Each player could have a limit of damage they can take (say 6 to make it easier to keep record with a spare die).

Alternatively, this platformer level-structure could be used for the parkour game I outlined above to maybe construct a more vertically interesting play environment (for such a vertically-oriented theme).

Like I said, still brain-storming this idea and teasing it out as I write. There are, obviously, several ways you could take and adjust these ideas to make them more functional and engaging in whichever aspect of the gameplay you want to focus more on.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.