Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
11 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » General Gaming

Subject: Sci-fi themes sell in Germany now? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Ralph T
United States
Signal Hill
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It used to be said (around the time RFTG was published) that German publishers didn't want sci-fi themed games, that they didn't sell.

Now with Perry Rhodan: The Cosmic League, The Swarm, Asteroyds, and a bunch of titles prior to this such as Space Alert, Space Dealer and Galaxy Trucker, is sci-fi now a safe and reliable theme for German boardgaming?

Or was the German boardgaming market always okay with space themed games?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Fraser
Australia
Melbourne
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Back in the days when there were less maps we played every map back to back
badge
Ooh a little higher, now a bit to the left, a little more, a little more, just a bit more. Oooh yes, that's the spot!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Looking at your list of examples, Space Alert and Galaxy Trucker and Asteroyds are actually, or originally, published by non German publishers.

Perry Rhodan: The Cosmic League and The Swarm are published by German publishers, but they are both part of Kosmos's literary series, i.e. games tied in to books (Perry Rhodan is very popular in Germany), so aren't really worth a full vote in that respect.

Thus on the balance of it, I would say the German publishers still don't want Science Fiction games per se. Which is a little strange since based on magazines etc. that I saw available in German newsagents last year, Science Fiction hits mainstream more than it does here in Australia.

Personally I think they should publish more Science Fiction games, but then I don't own a German publisher...
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
JOHN TODD JENSEN
United States
CLYMAN
WI
flag msg tools
Ask me about it!
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
ralpher wrote:
It used to be said (around the time RFTG was published) that German publishers didn't want sci-fi themed games, that they didn't sell.

Now with Perry Rhodan: The Cosmic League, The Swarm, Asteroyds, and a bunch of titles prior to this such as Space Alert, Space Dealer and Galaxy Trucker, is sci-fi now a safe and reliable theme for German boardgaming?

Or was the German boardgaming market always okay with space themed games?


Perry Rhodan and Der Schwarm are based on books, and the Germans sometimes make games out of the oddest books, just because they're books: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/55/sophies-world

Asteroyds is French, and the other three you mentioned are Czech.

On the other hand, Albion, a recent release, would make so much more sense with a sci-fi theme. You make the call.

(Edit: In other words, what he said!)
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ralph T
United States
Signal Hill
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
What's with the sci-fi-phobia among game-makers? The belief the games should appeal to everyone not geeks? Seems strange because this Perry Rhodan sounds to be as big a cultural hit as Doctor Who in Britain.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mitch T
United States
flag msg tools
mbmb
It's a rarely known trade secret that selling the most games turns the most profit. That, if anything, is my guess to why German publishers wouldn't make a sci-fi game, though maybe they just think sci-fi is for nerds.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
CHAPEL
United States
Round Rock
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
"that's a smith and wesson, and you've had your six"
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Karlsen wrote:
The Swarm are published by German publishers, but they are both part of Kosmos's literary series, i.e. games tied in to books (Perry Rhodan is very popular in Germany), so aren't really worth a full vote in that respect.
..


I didn't even know The Swarm boardgame was science fiction based. I guess it must have been "really" abstracted out, as it felt more like a oceanic research game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
JOHN TODD JENSEN
United States
CLYMAN
WI
flag msg tools
Ask me about it!
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
MWChapel wrote:
Karlsen wrote:
The Swarm are published by German publishers, but they are both part of Kosmos's literary series, i.e. games tied in to books (Perry Rhodan is very popular in Germany), so aren't really worth a full vote in that respect.
..


I didn't even know The Swarm boardgame was science fiction based. I guess it must have been "really" abstracted out, as it felt more like a oceanic research game.


Der Schwarm is sci-fi like The Abyss is sci-fi. It's about people underwater . . .
IN THE FUTURE!!!!!

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martin Gallo
United States
O'Fallon
Missouri
flag msg tools
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
Another possible bit of interesting trivia is that quite often, science fiction games of the past are about or heavily dependent on combat as part of the game. German gamers are apparently not big on combat, preferring trading or color matching (many area control mechanisms can be reduced to matching or aligning or arranging colors).

So, a science fiction theme pasted on to german games probably is not a big selling point. Perhaps a science fiction themed game of trading colored fabrics to trade for fashionable future looking clothes would work?
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ian Klinck
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
ralpher wrote:
What's with the sci-fi-phobia among game-makers? The belief the games should appeal to everyone not geeks?


My understanding is that games do have wider appeal in Germany.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andreas
Germany
flag msg tools
mb
It just doesn´t sell any good and since the publisher decides (in most cases) which theme the game will come in...

On the other hand, I think that there arn´t many designer who like sci-fi that much. I for myself don´t like it much with a few exceptions like Star Wars, while I like it very much if the sc-fi is set after a fallout or something similar. Maybe because in this scenario any sc-fi items are not the standard, but rare, dunno.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Roland T.
Germany
Near Frankfurt
Hessen
flag msg tools
Mind the Gap!
badge
Rule, Britannia! Britannia, rule the waves; Britons never will be slaves.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Finally the Germans start posting. It is pretty easy from my point of view. In Germany games are bought by families for families (and friends). The geeks are a pretty isolated minority.

I as a father of 2 and owner of 300 odd games for example have no interest to introduce my kids to geekhood but I am very interested to have my kids play games where they can interact with real people while learning social and economic skills wthout real world consequences. I very much prefer trading in the mediterrean to any space marine hack and slay theme.

Since I think most of the board game buyers in Germany agree with me (after all Germany is the country where board games are most main stream), I can see, why publishers do not want to waste their ressources on games that don't sell.

Does that make sense?
4 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.