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Wizardology: Spells and Potions» Forums » Rules

Subject: Can't play game without rules rss

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Diane Robins
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Just bought this game on eBay but seller did not reveal that there are no instructions or rules with it. Does anyone have a set of rules for the card game (not the board game)? Would appreciate any assistance. Thanks.
 
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B. Perry
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Colorado Springs
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The complete instructions, such as they are, have been posted in this thread:

http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/465526/wizardology-instructi...
 
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Brandi Katke
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Can you please send me the rules to the wizardology spells and potions card game?

Thanks
 
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Arturo Falck
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Welcome to the world of Spells n Potions (SnP) where Wizards compete using magical elements, spells, and potions to see who is the most powerful…or crafty!

Basic SnP Definitions:
Wizard – Each SnP player
Trick – Name of each round (each Wizard gets one turn) in a SnP game
Trick Points – points given to the winning Wizards at the end of each SnP trick
Four Magical Elements – Four SnP suits
1) Fire
2) Earth
3) Air
4) Water
Trump – The special and most powerful amulet (in the beginning, Trump is Fire).
Element Cards – Number cards (1 to 10 per Element/40 per deck).
Spells and Potions Cards - Magical cards; specific instructions on each card (12 in a basic deck).
1)Gladde’s Extra Power(1) - Adds 10 points to a trick
2)Pranxtor’s Fiery Reverse(2) - The lowest ranking card of the lead suit wins
3)Jaype’s Trump Shield(2) – The highest ranking card of the lead suit wins regardless if Trump was played
4)Merlin’s Power Blast(2) – Adds 2 ½ points to the rank of your team’s Element cards
5)Merlin’s New Apprentice(2) – The winner of the trick chooses who should lead the next Trick
6)Larfor’s Trump Choice(2) – Winner chooses Trump Element for the remainder of the deal
7)Harpier’s Penalty(1) – Subtracts 10 points from the value of the trick

­ Spells change the rules of a trick
­ Counter spells cancel the powers of certain spells
­ Potions give either a certain power or curse
­ Antidotes cancel the effect of certain potions

Potion Points – Points to be added or subtracted from the Trick points when specified in a Potion card used.

Game Overview:
Spells and Potions is a trick-based card game (just like Spades) with Fire as the trump suit. The basic game is played with two teams of two partners each. You are partnered with the Wizard (player) across from you. To play, each Wizard throws an Element or Potion card. The highest-ranking card at the end of each Trick (round), wins the points for his/her partnership. The team with the highest number of points at the end of the game (when the deck is finished) is the winner!



Getting Started (practice game):
• Separate the 12 SnP cards from the 40 Element cards.
• Shuffle SnP cards and, separately, shuffle the Element cards.
• Deal element cards until you run out (each player should have 10) and then deal SnP cards (each played should have 3).
• Wizards should read their SnP card to learn their effects.
• One Wizard leads with the Element of his/her choice. Everyone takes turns throwing in a card in clockwise order.
• Each card should be of a higher number Element than the previously thrown card, an SnP card or, if a player has no Element cards that are being played, he/she can throw in a Trump card.
• Play by the rules. Remember, only an Element card can win a Trick. So you’ll want to play the SnP cards to give your team the best chance to have the winning Element card at the end of the Trick.
• After each Trick, place the Trick cards face down in front of the winning Wizard.
• The winning Wizard leads the next Trick.
• Repeat until all the cards are played.
• Partners combine their Tricks, worth 10 points each plus or minus any Potion Points, and the team with the most Trick points wins.

Basic Play:
Rule #1: Every rule can be broken... with the right Spell or Potion!
Rule #2: You must play a card from the Element (suit) that was led for that Trick (round), if you have one.
Rule #3: If and only if you cannot follow the lead Element, you may play a card from any other Element including Trump. At the beginning Fire is Trump.
Rule #4: A SnP card may be played at any time when it’s your turn. Even if you have a card of the lead Element.
Rule #5: The highest card of the Element led wins the Trick unless Trump is thrown; in which case the highest Trump card wins the trick. (If all the cards in a Trick are SnP cards, then the leader of the Trick wins.)

Optional practice rounds (If that was too fast, start simple and add on as you become more comfortable):

1) Follow the leader: Play a basic round; following the lead Element without use of Trump or SnP cards.
2) Watch out for Trump: add in Trump Element
3) SnP: add in SnP cards

Congratulations!
You now know the basics of how to play Spells ‘n Potions. You are ready to play the Apprentice Version of a Ritual Game. Here is how:

Ritual (the full game):
SnP tournaments are originally designed for four (4) Wizards; although variations for 3 or 2 Wizard play exist and are described later on. (If you have less than 4 players, skip ahead).

Ritual SnP Definitions:
Duel – 13 trick contest between 2 partnerships
Tournament – 3-duel contest between individual Wizards played with rotating partners
Arranger - determines the initial tournament seating.
North, South, East or West – Seat/post for duel
Apprentice Version - using only the 12 SnP cards included in the basic deck
Fresh – stash of SnP cards not yet used in tournament play
Used stash – stash of SnP cards already used in tournament play

Ritual Tournament Play:
A tournament is a contest between individual Wizards played with rotating partners. At the end of the tournament each Wizard will have partnered with every other Wizard for one duel.

Phase 1: The Arranger: determines initial tournament seating.
• Each Wizard picks an Element card. The Wizard with the highest-ranking card is the Arranger. (If there is a tie for the highest-ranking card, the Wizards who tied repeat this step until an Arranger is selected.)
• The Arranger assigns each Wizard a post of North, South, East or West.
• North/South and East/West sit across from each other and form opposing partnerships.
• The Wizard of the West leads.
• The Wizard of the North will remain in that seat throughout the tournament while the others rotate after each duel.

Phase 2: Disclosure
Make sure each Wizard has seen and understands the basic SnP cards and skip to Phase 3.

Phase 3: Duels!
North shuffles the 12 SnP cards and deals 3 to each Wizard.

1. The Wizard of the South shuffles the element cards and deals 10 face-down to each Wizard.
2. The Wizard of the West leads the first trick. Play 13 tricks.
3. Tally each partnership’s score plus or minus any potion points. Each Wizard in the partnership receives the same score for that duel.
4. Switch partners: Wizards of the West, East and South rotate seats clockwise. The Wizard of the North remains in that seat for the duration of the tournament.
5. Repeat these steps to play 3 duels.

Phase 4: Tournament Results and High Praise:
• After engaging in 3 duels, add each Wizard’s individual scores.
• The Wizard with the highest individual score wins the tournament and gets High Praise from Merlin, as well as the full respect of all fellow Wizards!
• In the case of a tie, the winners share in the glory.


Instructions for three-player games: Variations from the four-player version are in blue.

Optional practice rounds:
You may want to repeat the practice game but dealing one hand for a Wizard’s Companion. Companion hands must be placed face-up so that all Wizards can see. The Wizard across plays the companion hands. It might be good to play it three times, with each player partnering with the companion once. Remember, this is just to give you some practice before you start the ritual!

Ritual Tournament Play:
A tournament is a contest between individual Wizards played with rotating partners. At the end of the tournament each Wizard will have partnered with every other Wizard for one duel and with the Wizard’s Companion for one duel.

Phase 1: The Arranger: determines initial tournament seating.
• Each Wizard picks an Element card. The Wizard with the highest-ranking card is the Arranger. (If there is a tie for the highest-ranking card, the Wizards who tied repeat this step until an Arranger is selected.)
• The Arranger assigns each Wizard a post of South, East or West.
• East/West are partners and the Wizard of the South partners with the companion hand (North) - to form opposing partnerships.
• The Wizard of the West leads.

Phase 2: Disclosure
Make sure each Wizard has seen and understands the basic SnP cards and skip to Phase 3.

Phase 3: Duels!
East shuffles the 12 SnP cards and deals 3 to each Wizard and 3 to the Wizard’s Companion.

1. The Wizard of the South shuffles the amulet cards and deals 10 face-down to each Wizard/Companion.
2. The Wizard of the West leads. Companion hands must be placed face-up so that all Wizards can see. Wizards play their Companion hands. Play 13 tricks.
3. Tally each partnership’s score plus or minus any potion points. Each Wizard in the partnership receives the same score for that duel. (Scores are not kept for companions.)
4. Switch partners: The Companion remains in the North seat throughout the tournament; Wizards of the West, East and South rotate seats clockwise after each duel.
5. Repeat these steps to play 3 duels.

Phase 4: Tournament Results and High Praise
• After engaging in 3 duels, add each Wizard’s individual scores.
• The Wizard with the highest individual score wins the tournament and gets High Praise from Merlin, as well as the full respect of all fellow Wizards!
• In the case of a tie, the winners share in the glory.

Instructions for two-player games: Variations from the four-player version are in blue.

Optional practice rounds:
You may want to repeat the practice game but dealing one hand for a Wizard’s companion for each player. Companion hands must be placed face-up so that both Wizards can see. Wizards play their companion hands. Remember, this is just to give you some practice before you start the ritual!

Ritual Tournament Play:
A tournament is a contest between two Wizards played in three duels.

Phase 1: The Arranger: Determines who will lead the first trick.
• Each Wizard picks an element card. The Wizard with the highest-ranking card is the Arranger. (If there is a tie for the highest-ranking card, repeat this step until an Arranger is selected.)
• The Arranger decides which Wizard will lead the first Trick of the first duel. On the other two duels, the Wizard that lost the previous duel gets to choose which Wizard will lead.

Phase 2: Disclosure
Make sure each Wizard has seen and understands the basic SnP cards and skip to Phase 3.

Phase 3: Duels!
One Wizard shuffles the 12 SnP cards and deals 3 to each Wizard and 3 to each Wizard’s Companion.

1. One Wizard shuffles the Element cards and deals 10 face-down to each Wizard/Companion.
2. One Wizard leads. Companion hands must be placed face-up so that all Wizards can see. Wizards play their companion hands. Play 13 tricks.
NOTE: if a Wizard leads, the next play is by the other Wizard, then the Companions. If a Companion leads, the next play is by the other Companion, then the Wizards.
3. Tally each partnership’s score plus or minus any potion points. (Scores are not kept for companions.)
4. Do not switch seats in two-Wizard games. The Wizard who lost the last duel chooses which Wizard leads the next.
5. Repeat steps to play 3 duels.

Phase 4: Tournament Results and High Praise
• After engaging in 3 duels, add each Wizard’s individual scores.
• The Wizard with the highest individual score wins the tournament and gets High Praise from Merlin, as well as the full respect of all of the fellow Wizards!
• In the case of a tie, the winners share in the glory.



More about SnP:
• It is tradition to greet your new partner with a handshake or a bow.
• Partnerships are an important aspect of the game.
• In a good partnership the Wizards understand each other.
• In a great partnership the Wizards can guess what their partner wants them to do
• Is it Magic? Maybe, but it's also strategy. For example, if your partner plays a low card, they may want you to play "Pranxton’s Fiery Reverse" so the low card becomes the winning card.
• Becoming a great Wizard takes logic, insight, and some trickery!
• To play at the highest-level means learning to guess which cards others have based on their play.
• It is considered impolite to tell other players about your own hand in any way.
• It is considered rude to look at other Wizards' hands.
• And it is downright despicable to conspire to send any type of secret message.
• When it’s over, be sure to thank your partner (possibly with a high-five if your team won the duel).

 
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