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Subject: Mazeology rss

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Joe O'Donnell
United States
Pennsylvania
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We picked this up at a yard sale when I was a kid. What a find! My friends and family and I loved it, and I was the only one I knew that had the game, much less heard of it.

The best part of the game was making the maze and seeing how well it worked. Stumbling through your opponents maze? Not quite as much fun.

Inevitably someone would try a spiral maze or the "donkey kong" maze, but once the opponent noticed the pattern they'd just follow it to the goal pretty quickly. And even if you placed the goal on a less obvious offshoot of the pattern, once the opponent filled it in, it didn't take long to retrace his steps and fill in what he missed.

One of the most evil tricks was to place the goal closed off right on the edge. A1 for example. So there was a 1/6 chance you'd lose immediately, and a 5/6 chance you'd drive your opponent crazy on a wild goose chase. I think we eventually made that type of maze illegal.

There were less evil variations on this. Making two mazes: one short one that led to the goal; one long hard one that led nowhere, but it was such a waste of time if your opponent picked the short one.

Another trick was to make lines and lines of walls with just one random gap in each wall. Very unimaginative, but effective. I don't think we made that illegal, but it was so boring it was rarely used.

The most fun were mazes with lots of traps, but you couldn't make the traps too big or you took the chance your opponent would miss the trap and there would be little left to block them from the goal.

My favorite kind of maze was one with just a couple entry points that led to basically two windy mazes that connected in just one place. Try to avoid long corridors. Make traps that lead nowhere or back to where you started. Place the goal in a corner squared off place somewhere, but place it almost at random. Don't build the maze around the goal or it will be obvious where the maze leads.

Sorry if these thoughts are more or less obvious. Just thought I'd write them down for nostalgic purposes. Chances are no one will read this obscure post for an obscure game. And if you do, you're quite the pathfinder!
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Robert Coleman
United States
Martinez
California
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I've always loved maze games, maze books and computerized maze building programs. I remember a friend and I in middle school used to make elaborate mazes on 8 1/2 x 11 inch sheets of writing paper and then challenge one another to complete the maze with the fewest number of backtracks. Thanks for the comments.
 
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Ivan De Moura
United States
Tujunga
California
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I just read your obscure comments about an obscure game. I wanted to let you know some one has read it. In fact, my seven year old son just used the same strategy you used, he put his target on the edge of the board surrounded with walls. Drove me crazy. Just thought I'd let you know.
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