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Xander Fulton
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Specifically, comments on comparison of points in this game to 'Seekrieg 5', as noted in question.

* Both games really are free-style 'miniature' games. "Fear God and Dread Nought" (from here on FG&DN) comes with BUCKETS of counters, though, which work great in lieu of miniatures. VERY high quality, VERY nice art on them. 420 ship counters and 280 aircraft, shore emplacement, and data marker counters. Seekrieg 5...well, doesn't. You need to use counters from another game or use miniatures.

* Both games require 'ship forms' to play the game - forms for tracking damage to the ship, weapons usage and effects, range, fire arcs, etc. FG&DN provides -data- on the ships included...but that's it. You need to create the 'ship forms' themselves from scratch. Seekrieg 5 comes with the ship forms on CD (included with the game) for ease of printing out when needed. Nice touch!

* Both games have pretty 'low level' tactical detail. Individual weapons salvos are rolled for, individual ships are moved (down to individual torpedo boats and aircraft). 'Seekrieg' definitely has a lot more detail here, though. In FG&DN, the broadside is fired as a group, with the weight of the broadside doing damage. In 'Seekrieg', the damage from each gun hit is rolled for location seperately - see next comment.

* Damage resolution also goes to 'Seekrieg'. FG&DN treats a ship as having 'x' number of floatation points that each weapons hit whittles away. Fairly traditional system, if entirely ahistorical. Critical hits do happen, as do fires, but you sink a ship more obviously by making it run out of floation points. In 'Seekrieg', each shell hits a part of the ship and does damage related to THAT part of the ship. The individual battery room hit, the specific boiler room destroyed, the armor at each point in the hull, etc is determined and accounted for.

* As to game charts - well, 'Seekrieg' has a number of game charts, with color titles and such to make them easier to use. FG&DN makes extensive use of charts, too, but they tend to be scattered throughout the book. There is a play aid available seperately - I can't imagine trying to play without it - that puts all the charts in one place. No color, though.

* 'Seekrieg' includes ships from 1880 through 1945, although not a form for EVERY ship in that time period (that's what the supplement CDs are for). FG&DN does a much better job with 'every ship'...but only covers the World War 1 time period. And, obviously, includes NO ship forms - but has the data for the units.

Overall, I'd say the 'simulation accuracy' of both products is really quite close. FG&DN looks to play substantially quicker, and comes closer to "ready to play" out of the box...but 'Seekrieg' has a more "nuts and bolts" damage and fire resolution system that will please many.

For the hardcore naval enthusiast....you should probably clear room on your shelf for BOTH titles. For a more casual gamer...ehhh, both titles are probably too deep for you. For people in between...it probably depends on which way your interests lie (fleet engagements vs nitty-gritty ship to ship or small squadron actions)...I think I'd go with FG&DN if only ONE of the two was an option in such a case.
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Warren Bruhn
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Not bad. Since I own copies of Fear God and Dread Nought, and some older version of Seakrieg, I concur with the suggestion that the casual gamer stear clear of both of these. These days I'm playing Fleet Action Imminent by Old Dominion Game Works (General Quarters III for WW1), and I'm liking the faster play and easier mechanics. But Fleet Action Imminent seems to have more than enough period detail to satisfy a WW1 naval fanatic like me.
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roger black
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The old AH Jutland game led me to go to Naval Architecture school. That required getting and BS in Mechanical Engineering prior to my MS in NA. Then it was time for my PhD exams. Done-OK ! Let's design ships !
Let's Rock-N-Roll !

Ummm ... try missile codes. Oops

Guess what ? "They don't build em like they used to."

Thus --> Beware, Jutland is an entry drug.
 
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