$35.00
Recommend
106 
 Thumb up
 Hide
38 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Mansions of Madness» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Mansion of Madness - First Impressions after a 90 Minutes session rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Manuel Drews
Germany
Frankfurt am Main
Hessen
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
Hey folks,

just returned from Spiel 1o in Essen and today we had the chance to test Mansion of Madness 4 months prior to Release at the Heidelberger Booth and let me say you this:

This game is a blast ! wow





Intro question:
Is it comparable to other Games ?
How much Arkham is in the Box ?

Mansion of Madness relies heavily on Myths of Cthulhu. It transports the mood of the Horror theme perfectly. If you are an experienced Arkham Gamer you'll get access to this game in minutes. There is lots of stuff and pieces that is probably well known to you... sanity markers, investigator cards, item cards and all the things you loved in the boardgaming world of Lovecraft.

The modular board pieces are very big and have nice drawings on it - you know already the pictures here. In reality this looks even better. You instantly get this feeling of "Damn, i HAVE to go in this room and look what hides there in the dark!".

Overall you can describe the look and feel of the game as a mix between Betrayal at House on the Hill, Descent and Arkham. Stunning.



By the way... like in Descent Mansion is played assymetrical. On the one hand there is always one mean guy - the keeper - who knows where the right clues are - think of the role as the Overlord in Descent -
on the other hand there are the investigators who are thrown right into the adventure without knowing anything. That's right. There is no plan like "you have to seal six gates in order to win". No. You just start with a brief introduction to the scenario and then you start exploring.

Covert Clue Cards are spread along some rooms which offer the possibility for the investigator to reveal either useful weapons (axes, fire extinguishers, the good ol' whiskey, magic books) or a clue which promotes the storyline.



In Mansion of Madness the keeper player keeps track of the progress of the investigators. Each Story Clue Card triggers events in the game. In our game for example, we discovered that the homeowner practiced occult rituals in order to resurrect his wife who died of a horrible disease. After we discovered some clues it turned out that Walther (the homeowner) is still here and tries to absorb your souls in order to have some energy for his rituals. OH MY GOD !!

Sometimes you go in a room and have to solve some puzzles. Yes, you did not mishear. Mansion of Madness comes with little Minipuzzles in little sizes of 8, 9, 10.... tiles and in different difficulty levels ! If you discover one you can spend some intellect points of your character in order to move the tiles so they match with a given picture. Sounds a little bit weird but it perfectly fit in the storyline. There was one situation in which we had to open a safe. The keeper gave us a combination-lock puzzle, where we had to match colors in a row to unlock the safe. But to keep our feet on the ground we have to see if this is something that works out over the long run of more game sessions.

But whats about the monsters. First, they look great, are really big and truly awe-inspiring. Similiar to Arkham there are Monster tokens, but this time they are mounted under the monster, so that you do not know which stats the monster has (so each Monster can have different stats in each game, the keeper randomly chooses a monster marker i think).



In my opinion this element is great and enhances the game in contrast to Arkham. We all know the moments in which the investigators put their head together in order to calculate how much dice and skill points are need in order to do this or that with the cthonian. Mansion of Madness keeps up the momentum by not allowing too much analysis by the player. Sure, this may be a downer for all of the players who like to be more in control of what is happening. MoM makes it harder to handle the dangers but i think this is a authentic implementation. If a cthonian, cultist or whatever passes your way there is not time to ask for stats but a need for action - run, hide or use your weapon. Like in roleplaying games...



By the way... some other little things are in the game which are interesting. There is the possibility for the keeper to use burning monsters (a burning maker is attached to the monster) - now you know why a fire extinguisher may be needed ;-)



Sometimes the keeper can put out the light in a room so you really need a lantern - yes, the lantern has a REAL FUNCTION, not only for adding a point to your luck skill ;-) Then, in one situation, a monster discovered my professor and teared out one tooth (a little tooth marker was placed on the monster). Very funny... but oh... for sure painful

But back to the Combat System.

Combat in Arkham is implemented via cards. When you use a ranged weapon you draw cards from the weapon deck until you see the headline "ranged-weapon, no weapon (fists), melee weapon",... then there is a test, i.e. test your strength (+1) and a pass and fail condition. This mechanism is similiar to the encounter cards of Arkham but this time they refer to the kind of weapon you use.

For example - when you want to shoot with the tommy gun on the cultist you have to draw cards from the weapon deck until you find a card with the headline "ranged-weapon". Then there is an atmospheric text and a test, like "test your strength". When you pass the check you deal damage to the monster otherwise you have to take 1 damage.



This reduces the need for dice. You only use ONE Dice with which you handle the skill-checks. Some may like it, others may dislike it. Personally i like it, because it streamlines the gameplay and concentrates the action not on calculation but on story.

Unfortunatley we had to stop our game befor the great final and meeting with Walther the evil Homeowner because other visitors wanted to play the game...

To sum up, i can say that this game is an experience game. It is no strategic "euro" in which players have to analyse the situation in order to optimise their situation... it's more like a good b-horror moviefilm in which YOU play the leading part. If you enjoy these games, this is a MUST-buy. Players who like Battlestar Galactica, Arkham Horror, Betrayal or Descent are in good hands...



I can't await the release in February and i'am glad that is was possible to test this beauty for a short time. If you have questions don't hesitate to ask... hope this short overview gave you a glimpse what expects you in MoM.

Greetings from Germany
and sorry in advance for my rusty English ;-)

Manuel




  • [+] Dice rolls
  • [+]
  • 1532. manueld
  • 1d10 =
  • (6) =
  • 6
  • Test your dexterity !
  • Sun Oct 24, 2010 9:03 pm
Kristofer Dahl
Sweden
Uppsala
flag msg tools
manueld wrote:
Hey folks,

just returned from Spiel 1o in Essen and today we had the chance to test Mansion of Madness 4 months prior to Release at the Heidelberger Booth and let me say you this:

This game is a blast ! wow

Intro question:
Is it comparable to other Games ?
How much Arkham is in the Box ?

Mansion of Madness relies heavily on Myths of Cthulhu. It transports the mood of the Horror theme perfectly. If you are an experienced Arkham Gamer you'll get access to this game in minutes. There is lots of stuff and pieces that is probably well known to you... sanity markers, investigator cards, item cards and all the things you loved in the boardgaming world of Lovecraft.

The modular board pieces are very big and have nice drawings on it - you know already the pictures here. In reality this looks even better. You instantly get this feeling of "Damn, i HAVE to go in this room and look what hides there in the dark!".

Overall you can describe the look and feel of the game as a mix between Betrayal at House on the Hill, Descent and Arkham. Stunning.

By the way... like in Descent Mansion is played assymetrical. On the one hand there is always one mean guy - the keeper - who knows where the right clues are - think of the role as the Overlord in Descent -
on the other hand there are the investigators who are thrown right into the adventure without knowing anything. That's right. There is no plan like "you have to seal six gates in order to win". No. You just start with a brief introduction to the scenario and then you start exploring.

Covert Clue Cards are spread along some rooms which offer the possibility for the investigator to reveal either useful weapons (axes, fire extinguishers, the good ol' whiskey, magic books) or a clue which promotes the storyline.

In Mansion of Madness the keeper player keeps track of the progress of the investigators. Each Story Clue Card triggers events in the game. In our game for example, we discovered that the homeowner practiced occult rituals in order to resurrect his wife who died of a horrible disease. After we discovered some clues it turned out that Walther (the homeowner) is still here and tries to absorb your souls in order to have some energy for his rituals. OH MY GOD !!

Sometimes you go in a room and have to solve some puzzles. Yes, you did not mishear. Mansion of Madness comes with little Minipuzzles in little sizes of 8, 9, 10.... tiles and in different difficulty levels ! If you discover one you can spend some intellect points of your character in order to move the tiles so they match with a given picture. Sounds a little bit weird but it perfectly fit in the storyline. There was one situation in which we had to open a safe. The keeper gave us a combination-lock puzzle, where we had to match colors in a row to unlock the safe. But to keep our feet on the ground we have to see if this is something that works out over the long run of more game sessions.

But whats about the monsters. First, they look great, are really big and truly awe-inspiring. Similiar to Arkham there are Monster tokens, but this time they are mounted under the monster, so that you do not know which stats the monster has (so each Monster can have different stats in each game, the keeper randomly chooses a monster marker i think).

In my opinion this element is great and enhances the game in contrast to Arkham. We all know the moments in which the investigators put their head together in order to calculate how much dice and skill points are need in order to do this or that with the cthonian. Mansion of Madness keeps up the momentum by not allowing too much analysis by the player. Sure, this may be a downer for all of the players who like to be more in control of what is happening. MoM makes it harder to handle the dangers but i think this is a authentic implementation. If a cthonian, cultist or whatever passes your way there is not time to ask for stats but a need for action - run, hide or use your weapon. Like in roleplaying games...

By the way... some other little things are in the game which are interesting. There is the possibility for the keeper to use burning monsters (a burning maker is attached to the monster) - now you know why a fire extinguisher may be needed ;-) Sometimes the keeper can put out the light in a room so you really need a lantern - yes, the lantern has a REAL FUNCTION, not only for adding a point to your luck skill ;-) Then, in one situation, a monster discovered my professor and teared out one tooth (a little tooth marker was placed on the monster). Very funny... but oh... for sure painful

But back to the Combat System.

Combat in Arkham is implemented via cards. When you use a ranged weapon you draw cards from the weapon deck until you see the headline "ranged-weapon, no weapon (fists), melee weapon",... then there is a test, i.e. test your strength (+1) and a pass and fail condition. This mechanism is similiar to the encounter cards of Arkham but this time they refer to the kind of weapon you use.

For example - when you want to shoot with the tommy gun on the cultist you have to draw cards from the weapon deck until you find a card with the headline "ranged-weapon". Then there is an atmospheric text and a test, like "test your strength". When you pass the check you deal damage to the monster otherwise you have to take 1 damage.

This reduces the need for diceS. You only use ONE Dice with which you handle the skill-checks. Some may like it, others may dislike it. Personally i like it, because it streamlines the gameplay and concentrates the action not on calculation but on story.

Unfortunatley we had to stop our game befor the great final and meeting with Walther the evil Homeowner because other visitors wanted to play the game...

To sum up, i can say that this game is an experience game. It is no strategic "euro" in which players have to analyse the situation in order to optimise their situation... it's more like a good b-horror moviefilm in which YOU play the leading part. If you enjoy these games, this is a MUST-buy. Players who like Battlestar Galactica, Arkham Horror, Betrayal or Descent are in good hands...

I can't await the release in February and i'am glad that is was possible to test this beauty for a short time. If you have questions don't hesitate to ask... hope this short overview gave you a glimpse what expects you in MoM.

Greetings from Germany
and sorry in advance for my rusty English ;-)

Manuel






Would you say the game is most simular to Descent or Arkham Horror?
Both my girlfriend and I like Descent a lot but we have great trouble with Arkham Horror.

To me Arkham is "overproduced" add 3 + 3 + 3 and substract - 8 for an attack etc. Also it's like they found this "great" mechanic called checks and slapped it on everything in the entire game.
I would have liked Arkham much more streamlined.

So my question is simple. When you play, do you get a Descent or a Arkham vibe?

I did buy Arkham Horror for the setting which I think is really cool. But I do not like the gameplay at all.

So if Mansions is Descent (gameplay) and Arkham (setting) it sounds like a game I would buy.

Thanks!
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Evan Derrick
United States
Franklin
Tennessee
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks so much for the report, Manuel. Nothing you mentioned is a surprise in the slightest (except, perhaps, the puzzles) - first time I heard of this game I immediately thought Arkham+Betrayal+Descent. However, it's good to know that the elements work well together.

Sometimes I just want a good B-grade horror flick, not an Oscar winner, and this sounds like it will fit the bill perfectly.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric Henson
United States
Albuquerque
New Mexico
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Your English was very good, and thanks for this report! I'm even more excited for this game now.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Chaplin
United Kingdom
Nottingham
Ice-choked tower, Mondavia, Nanglangka.
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
The mini-games sound very interesting indeed.



3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Manuel Drews
Germany
Frankfurt am Main
Hessen
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
@Kristofer

Your Question:
When you play, do you get a Descent or a Arkham vibe?

I own both... Arkham and Descent.

To answer your question... i think you get the best of both of it.

I like Descent a lot, especially the exploring part, where you're looking to "solve" the scenario. But the Hack & Slash part in Descent takes much more game time than the explore & discovery - part. I would say the combat - but that is typical for Cthulhu - is not the centerpart of the game. In MoM you have a great time exploring the story, solve the puzzles and following the clues within the Mansion. You can think of it more as an adventure with combat than an dungeon-crawler with a lot of hack & slash. Combat in MoM is part of the story and is used specifically. The keeper has - similiar to the tokens the Overlord has - a currency with which he can pay traps and create minions. But in contrast to Descent there is no flood of monsters. I think this fits the theme very well, because it is a horror-game.

Supension does not come from monster floods, it comes from the strange whisperings next door zombie

In addition MoM takes less time than Descent. Descent is in a range of 3 to 8 hours i would say - depending on the scenario. MoM is a concentrated experience of 2 to 3 hours. Personally i prefer a focused game than a overall epic journey that leaves the players totally exhausted after hours and hours of play - but i think experienced Twilight Imperium fans have a different view on this topic ;-)

I think MoM is a good alternative approach to the whole Cthulhu theme - it is definitely more streamlined than Arkham. You asked about the vibe. The great and mysterious "Arkham Horror vibe" is definitely there and my impression was, that this vibe is not disturbed by "downtime minutes" of finding the best combination of dice. I think that does not mean the game is lightweight and reduced in complexity, i would say the strategic part is more focused on the story now, not the best combination of character stats and items, although they play a still an important role.

The best comparison for this experience in my view is something like a pimped Betrayal at House on the Hill with a Cthulhu theme combined with excellent material.
19 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Manuel Drews
Germany
Frankfurt am Main
Hessen
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
@ Mark

In the course of the game i saw three Mini-Puzzles.

One was the "Open the Safe" - puzzle where you had to shuffle the tiles in a way that connected similiar colors in the same row.

Anothere puzzle was iniated because we had a power failure in a room. The investigator had to solve a "electricity-wire"-puzzle in order to repare the electric circuit. After he did it he was able to look through the card deck that lay in the room.

The last one was started in order to open a locked door. The difficulty was rated as medium and it took some time for our investigator to figure out how to solve it. You can imagine this as some kind of sliding tile puzzle in which every "slide move" is paid by an intellect point of your character.

By the way.... in each skill-check in MoM you have the option to spend a skill point - indicated by little maginifier markers. With that you can spend luck points from your character and add them to the corresponding check. For example you could spend 1 skill point in order to add - lets say the investigator has a luck of 4 - four points to the strength-check you have to make against a minion. Nice :-)

Another little variant in handling the markers in contrast to Arkham is that the Health and Sanity Markers are not given to the players corresponding to their stats at the beginning of the game. It is vice versa. For example: Every time you loose one Sanity a Horror Marker is given to you. If the Number of Horror Markers reaches your current Sanity you will go mad ;-)
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris J Davis
United Kingdom
London
flag msg tools
designer
Overtext pending moderation...
mbmbmbmbmb
manueld wrote:

Another little variant in handling the markers in contrast to Arkham is that the Health and Sanity Markers are not given to the players corresponding to their stats at the beginning of the game. It is vice versa. For example: Every time you loose one Sanity a Horror Marker is given to you. If the Number of Horror Markers reaches your current Sanity you will go mad ;-)


Apart from the actual manual difference (giving rather than taking), what difference does this make to the gameplay?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Manuel Drews
Germany
Frankfurt am Main
Hessen
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
@Chris

My feeling is that this contributes to the feeling that the game is more streamlined and not so overloaded with material. I was not busy organizing my stuff (i.e. counting 12 health and 14 sanity markers to get an overview of my stats). In contrast i had 3 Horror tokens and knew that i have 11 Sanity left. Its clearer arranged.

But for sure you are right Chris, this is not a very big difference in context of the gameplay mechanism ;-)
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris J Davis
United Kingdom
London
flag msg tools
designer
Overtext pending moderation...
mbmbmbmbmb
Do stamina/health (or whatever it's called in this game) and sanity have a more interesting use than in Arkham Horror (i.e, are they more than just hit points)?
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Manuel Drews
Germany
Frankfurt am Main
Hessen
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
As far as i know no.

I remember that there were Cards with a permanent negative effect for the player - similar to the invalidity cards in Arkham.

For example:
One of our investigators got a kleptomania Card, which said, that every time this investigator is on the same space like others he/she will steal every item the others in the space own... ;-)
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan Conley
United States
Milwaukie
Oregon
flag msg tools
Life is too short not to live it up a little!
mbmbmbmbmb
Manuel...thanks for posting a GREAT report! You addressed most of the questions I've had, mainly "how much Descent am I getting in MoM?". We played LOTS of Descent for awhile. The LOOOOOOONG playtime (at least for our group) got to be a REAL drag and I feared that MoM might have the same issue.

Thanks for laying THAT fear to rest! Sounds like a quality game experience! Now to decide whether to get one myself or just play with the copy I KNOW my friend will get... whistle
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wouter Dhondt
Belgium
Anzegem
flag msg tools
My armor is contempt. My shield is disgust. My sword is hatred. In the Emperor's name, let none survive.
badge
Song of my soul, my voice is dead; Die thou, unsung, as tears unshed. Shall dry and die in Lost Carcosa.
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
I like Descent a lot, especially the exploring part, where you're looking to "solve" the scenario. But the Hack & Slash part in Descent takes much more game time than the explore & discovery - part. I would say the combat - but that is typical for Cthulhu - is not the centerpart of the game. In MoM you have a great time exploring the story, solve the puzzles and following the clues within the Mansion. You can think of it more as an adventure with combat than an dungeon-crawler with a lot of hack & slash.


This makes me sooo happy! The only fear I had was that the game would turn into a hack and slash fest. Sure you need combat, but I'm glad the emphasis is on exploring and adventure.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mat Mat
msg tools
Having promoted the game for 3 days a row, the good thing I can say: I still is a great game that I enjoyed playing very much (which I cannot say about every game I suppoted several days a row). Hated to give away the prototype after the fair... cry

manueld wrote:
@ Mark
In the course of the game i saw three Mini-Puzzles.

There is 3 types of puzzles: Rune (sliding tiles picture puzzle), wire (turn and replace wires to close a circuit) and ... uh don't remember the name, combination lock style turning knobs. All puzzles come in 3 different difficulties that take more turns to solve.

bleached_lizard wrote:
Do stamina/health (or whatever it's called in this game) and sanity have a more interesting use than in Arkham Horror (i.e, are they more than just hit points)?

There are trauma cards like "concussion", "kleptomania" and even "only way out" (a card that makes the investigator kill himself) that can be played once a certain threshold of stamina / sanity is reached.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Manuel Drews
Germany
Frankfurt am Main
Hessen
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
Tonight i'am posting additional pictures from the game ;-) I think this could be interesting for some readers here.

@Martin (exceptionally in german)
... das war gute Arbeit ! Haben uns sehr wohl gefühlt an Deinem Tisch.
Vielleicht erinnerst Du Dich... wir waren die Gruppe am Sonntag um 11, die nach den französischen Pressevertretern am Tisch waren und dich mit Nüssen gefüttert hat *g*


4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris J Davis
United Kingdom
London
flag msg tools
designer
Overtext pending moderation...
mbmbmbmbmb
Can anyone please give very detailed description of how each type of puzzle works (i.e, down to the specific rules of what a player is allowed to do with each point of Intelligence)?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris J Davis
United Kingdom
London
flag msg tools
designer
Overtext pending moderation...
mbmbmbmbmb
Also, are there any non-linear scenarios? The only one we've heard of so far was described as being completely linear.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mat Mat
msg tools
The rune puzzle works by switching one puzzle part with a neigbour, one move per intellect. Like a picture sliding puzzle
Beware! Loss of sanity...


The combination locks are color coded (4 colors) and you may exchange neigbouring tiles, draw a random tile or turn 90° per intellect.

The wire puzzles work the same, but only blue and red cables that have to color match.


The Scenarios are quite linear, once they are set up - in a way that you cannot change the background story or objective any more. They are non-linear in a way that they can take completely other turns and twists, when the investigators find clue2 or clue 3 first, go left instead of right, ...


P.S.: Danke für die Nüsse, die Kalorien haben mich über den Tag gerettet.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ian McCarthy
United States
Milwaukee
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
manueld wrote:
@ Mark

In the course of the game i saw three Mini-Puzzles.

One was the "Open the Safe" - puzzle where you had to shuffle the tiles in a way that connected similiar colors in the same row.

Anothere puzzle was iniated because we had a power failure in a room. The investigator had to solve a "electricity-wire"-puzzle in order to repare the electric circuit. After he did it he was able to look through the card deck that lay in the room.

The last one was started in order to open a locked door. The difficulty was rated as medium and it took some time for our investigator to figure out how to solve it. You can imagine this as some kind of sliding tile puzzle in which every "slide move" is paid by an intellect point of your character.

By the way.... in each skill-check in MoM you have the option to spend a skill point - indicated by little maginifier markers. With that you can spend luck points from your character and add them to the corresponding check. For example you could spend 1 skill point in order to add - lets say the investigator has a luck of 4 - four points to the strength-check you have to make against a minion. Nice :-)

Another little variant in handling the markers in contrast to Arkham is that the Health and Sanity Markers are not given to the players corresponding to their stats at the beginning of the game. It is vice versa. For example: Every time you loose one Sanity a Horror Marker is given to you. If the Number of Horror Markers reaches your current Sanity you will go mad ;-)


This game sounded really fun until I read the above comment.

I think the puzzles just won't work with many gamers. It reminds me of playing old PC point and click adventure games or DS games like Professor Layton. I actually enjoy these kinds of puzzles in that context, but I don't think I would enjoy doing them under the watchful eyes of other gamers.

And I don't think I would enjoy watching someone else struggle with the solution, particularly of something as boring as a sliding tile puzzle. I can think of several gamers that will likely refuse to even set their brains to these tasks, fearing failure or the judgment of the other players at the table.

And, the puzzles are yet another thing that spoils the potential replay-ability of the game.

And the other part of the comment, the strength check part, really does not sound like an exciting mechanic to me. Granted, I have never played Arkham Horror, but I guess the idea of making "checks" by rolling versus certain stats comes from role playing.

I was never a role player, either, so the idea of calculating some combination of stats to find a number that I need to roll on a die and then spending "skill points" to make it happen just doesn't have much appeal to me as a gamer.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve
United States
Lubbock
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
KenToad wrote:
And I don't think I would enjoy watching someone else struggle with the solution, particularly of something as boring as a sliding tile puzzle. I can think of several gamers that will likely refuse to even set their brains to these tasks, fearing failure or the judgment of the other players at the table.


Really? To me that does not sound like a fun environment to play games in. I'd hate to feel worried about other players' judgment at the table in any kind of coop game.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ian McCarthy
United States
Milwaukee
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
garysax wrote:
KenToad wrote:
And I don't think I would enjoy watching someone else struggle with the solution, particularly of something as boring as a sliding tile puzzle. I can think of several gamers that will likely refuse to even set their brains to these tasks, fearing failure or the judgment of the other players at the table.


Really? To me that does not sound like a fun environment to play games in. I'd hate to feel worried about other players' judgment at the table in any kind of coop game.


Well, in most games there is no 100 percent certain best move, but obviously in the case of sliding tile puzzles and I'm assuming the other puzzles, you either make the best possible move or you don't. And people are just likely to make judgments based upon whether you did. I can't think of any other cooperative game that doesn't take this into account. Most of the folks in my particular game group will not make this a huge issue, but out of over 20 individuals, I can think of several who will judge or feel judged.

And c'mon, a sliding tile puzzle? I have to watch someone do that?

This part of the game just doesn't sound fun (or thematic) to me.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Outlaw
United Kingdom
Devizes
Wiltshire
flag msg tools
The Wing Warrior - learn more at www.facebook.com/thelegendriders
mbmbmbmbmb
KenToad wrote:
garysax wrote:
KenToad wrote:
And I don't think I would enjoy watching someone else struggle with the solution, particularly of something as boring as a sliding tile puzzle. I can think of several gamers that will likely refuse to even set their brains to these tasks, fearing failure or the judgment of the other players at the table.


Really? To me that does not sound like a fun environment to play games in. I'd hate to feel worried about other players' judgment at the table in any kind of coop game.


Well, in most games there is no 100 percent certain best move, but obviously in the case of sliding tile puzzles and I'm assuming the other puzzles, you either make the best possible move or you don't. And people are just likely to make judgments based upon whether you did. I can't think of any other cooperative game that doesn't take this into account. Most of the folks in my particular game group will not make this a huge issue, but out of over 20 individuals, I can think of several who will judge or feel judged.

And c'mon, a sliding tile puzzle? I have to watch someone do that?

This part of the game just doesn't sound fun (or thematic) to me.


First of all - have to say that I wouldn't play games with people who "judge" people in such a way as to make them feel bad. A bit of friendly heckling is one thing, but I'm not into spending my time with people who try to make you feel stupid.

Okay - with that out of the way... I think this sounds like something a bit different and refreshing, and I appreciate the effort to move the game away from mindless combat and into something that is more puzzle-orientated. Whether it works or not remains to be seen, but as you only get a few moves based on intellect I can't imagine they are going to be really hard time-consuming puzzles.

If it's not for you, I can almost guarantee there will be some kind of replacement rule (i.e. if you don't want to do the puzzles, just make an intelligence test - roll a die, pass or fail, move on).

Quick question for those who have seen the game - is there much evidence of the presence of GOOs? Okay, I am not expecting Cthulhu to tramp through the house (wouldn't want him to either), but does his influence turn up in certain cards etc?
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Kefauver
United States
Saint Charles
Illinois
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
I think the sliding puzzle thing is a great attempt at a new mechanic. Whether it succeeds or fails, it uses stats in an interesting, new way that still gives the players more control over their fate than a die roll. It's a great fusion of the age-old RPG problem where the DM wants the heroes to solve a puzzle, but the guy with 24 INT wants to have his character solve it.

Whether it flops or flies, I applaud FFG for being willing to try something new when they could've made it a flat stat roll instead.

And, if it turns out the puzzles suck, you can do that exact same thing pretty easy. Just make it a roll vs. a stat. Perfect? No, but certainly a viable alternative.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mat Mat
msg tools
The sliding games are not too complicated and you will have 1-4 puzzles per session and each character may attempt to solve them, so if a player is not into it, some other player can move his investigator in and (with a higher intellect) solve it and have fun.

If you dislike them completely, you are allowed to break the combination lock puzzle open, when you have the axe in your equipment.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris J Davis
United Kingdom
London
flag msg tools
designer
Overtext pending moderation...
mbmbmbmbmb
KenToad wrote:
garysax wrote:
KenToad wrote:
And I don't think I would enjoy watching someone else struggle with the solution, particularly of something as boring as a sliding tile puzzle. I can think of several gamers that will likely refuse to even set their brains to these tasks, fearing failure or the judgment of the other players at the table.


Really? To me that does not sound like a fun environment to play games in. I'd hate to feel worried about other players' judgment at the table in any kind of coop game.


Well, in most games there is no 100 percent certain best move, but obviously in the case of sliding tile puzzles and I'm assuming the other puzzles, you either make the best possible move or you don't. And people are just likely to make judgments based upon whether you did. I can't think of any other cooperative game that doesn't take this into account. Most of the folks in my particular game group will not make this a huge issue, but out of over 20 individuals, I can think of several who will judge or feel judged.

And c'mon, a sliding tile puzzle? I have to watch someone do that?

This part of the game just doesn't sound fun (or thematic) to me.


I think the puzzle mechanic is a genuine stroke of genius. It's a very clever way of linking together a problem/obstacle in the game with *both* the intellect of the player and the intellect rating of the character.

And there's nothing we've heard so far that says the other players just have to watch. It's a team effort, as far as I'm aware (though it would be simple enough to house-rule that the other players aren't allowed to help if you prefer it that way, which I think I might).
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.