Recommend
140 
 Thumb up
 Hide
84 Posts
1 , 2 , 3 , 4  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » PBEM » Werewolf

Subject: The Guide To Playing Werewolf On BoardGameGeek rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: getarope [+] [View All]
United States
Cincinnati
Ohio
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmb
The original post that was here is gone and will be missed, but here is a modified version. I would appreciate feedback and possible additions to this guide and I'll try to keep things up to date as much as possible.



Welcome Word To New Players

Obviously, this thread is mostly dedicated to new players that stumble upon our little corner of the web so I'd like to start this off by saying “Hi” to you. We are a small but pretty solid community that is always interested in making new friends. So, if you're reading this and you're interested in playing a game with us, please feel very welcome.

The goal of this thread is to provide a guide that contains every piece of basic information for new players to make them ready to start playing a game of Werewolf. If, after reading this, you still have questions, feel free to ask them. You can either do so in this thread or contact someone that you see playing. We are all more than willing to help you out.

Now, Werewolf is not a difficult game to learn since the rules are pretty compact and easy to understand. However, playing the game can be daunting at times. Critics often say that werewolf has one big disadvantage and that is the fact that with each round of play some players must leave the game and stop playing. Clearly that means this game is not for everyone. However, since Werewolf is a team game all players that leave the game before it ends will still win if their team wins. Additionally, there is always a new game starting up in the online environment.

Secondly, werewolf is game that thrives on players making accusations against each other. Sometimes discussions will get heated and sometimes that results in frustration which can be hard to process for players. In this community we strongly believe in keeping things 'in the game' and not making it personal. There are times when we cross that line but we usually follow it up with apologies and forget about it, because, after all, it's just a game. If something like this happens in one of your first games, don't be put off. This does not mean that you have to accept offensive behavior; if you have a question or a concern, please do not hesitate to talk with your moderator.

Werewolf is a very social game - arguably the most social online game in existence. 'Cause after all, the only thing you're really doing is chatting with other people in a forum thread. You will find that games in the BGG WW forum are usually full of interesting banter, jokes, and people just basically having a good time with each other amidst the strategizing.

If you're still interested in playing, please carry on.

Quick Start

1. Create a BoardGameGeek account: https://boardgamegeek.com/register
2. Create a Cassandra Password using your BGG account: http://cassandrawerewolf.com/signup.php
3. Find password in your BGG geekmail: https://boardgamegeek.com/geekmail
4. Sign in: http://cassandrawerewolf.com/index.php?login=true
5. Join a game In Signup that looks interesting to you: http://cassandrawerewolf.com/

The Guide To Playing Werewolf On BoardGameGeek

This Guide is divided into several chapters & paragraphs for easy reference. Those are:

1 The Game

1.1 What is Werewolf?
1.2 Lynches
1.3 Nightkills
1.4 Communications
1.5 Moderation

2 The Cassandra Project

2.1 Registration
2.2 Ready to play?
2.3 The Game Page
2.4 Miscellaneous Functions

3 Werewolf Etiquette

4 Frequently Asked Questions

5 Advanced Games

5.1 Theme
5.2 Setup
5.3 Roles
5.4 Teams
5.5 Attributes
5.6 Mechanics
5.7 Items
5.8 Locations

6 An index of other informational and (formerly) pinned threads


1 - The Game

This is a forum dedicated to playing the game of Werewolf. The online game is played similar to the card game.

1.1 What is Werewolf?

There are two basic principles to the game:

1) Two teams, uninformed majority vs informed minority, try to eliminate each other by using two ways of killing off players: lynching and nightkilling.
2) The game alternates between two phases: days for lynches and nights for nightkilling.

In online BGG WW, there are two methods of keeping track of the time. The standard format uses a 24 hour basis for it's day/night cycle, with dusk (the lynch) taking place at the same time every day, and dawn (the night kill) taking place a short amount of time after. Standard games typically do not function on the weekend or American holidays.
The fast format takes place on a much more rapid cycle. Normally, a fast game will have a day of 15-30 minutes followed by a night of 5-10 minutes. This allows players to gather for a fast game and finish it in a single evening, instead of the multi-day process that is a standard game. Fast games will run whenever they fill - weekday, weekend, or holiday.

For the purpose of deciding which team wins the game the roles in each (basic) game can be best divided into 3 main categories: Good roles, Max Evil roles and Aux Evil roles.

The standard victory conditions in a game are these:

Team Good wins when all the Max Evil roles are eliminated.

Team Evil wins when the Max Evil roles reach parity with the Good roles plus the Aux Evil roles.

It should be noted that Aux Evil Roles work toward the Evil victory condition while normally counting against Evil parity. It should also be noted that Players may win even if they are eliminated; if their team wins, all eliminated players on that team also win.

1.2 Lynches

During the day phase of a game, every player votes on other players. These votes can be changed as often as a player wants during the day. The player that has received the most votes at dusk (which is the name for the deadline for submitting votes and marks the transition from the day phase to the night phase) will be eliminated and cannot post any messages in the game thread after that point. Voting is done by making a post in the thread that has the username of the player you want to vote for in brackets and bolded, like this: [vote PeteVasi].

During the day phase players are free (and encouraged) to strategize in the thread and post explanations for their votes.

Obviously the Good players (uninformed majority) will try to lynch an Evil player during the day, while the Evil players (informed minority) try to prevent this. This will result in a discussion based on truths, half-truths and lies combined with strategically placed votes. The key is to find out who is telling the truth and who is lying.

In case the lynch vote ends in a tie, a tiebreaker is used to decide who gets lynched. In most games the tiebreaker is given at the start of the game and will usually be LHLV. LHLV stands for Longest Held Last Vote. This means that if 2 or more people tie in number of votes, all votes will be disregarded except for the last vote cast on each of the players tying. Of those votes the one that was cast first in chronological order is the vote that decides the tie. Voting tallies will be kept during each day phase of a game. In these tallies all votes are followed by a unique number. The lower that number is the earlier the vote was cast and thus it will be easy to determine which vote will decide a tie.

As an example:

Melsana - 4 - LudesFactor(4), Gelatinous Goo(9), jageroxorz(13), Spud(15)
LudesFactor - 4 - kristiefix(2), Whirlinghurly(3), Spud(7), yohanleafheart(11), Melsana(16)
Valkerie32 - 2 - kuchick(5), Kaldar(10), Geniesse(12)

In this tally Melsana & Ludesfactor have an equal amount of votes (4) and so they tie for lynch. The last vote on Melsana was cast by Spud and has the number 15 following it. The last vote on LudesFactor was cast by Melsana and has the number 16 following it. As explained, the lower the number, the earlier the vote was cast and thus Spud’s vote will decide this tie, meaning Melsana is lynched.

1.3 Nightkills

During the night phases of a game, the max Evil players decide together which of the players they want to kill. The target will be announced at Dawn (the start of the next day phase) and this player cannot post any messages in the game thread after that point.

This day-night cycle will continue until one of the victory conditions is met.

1.4 Communications

In a standard game of BGG Werewolf, Good players and aux Evil players can only communicate in the public thread. Max evil players, in addition to the game thread, will have a secret chatroom (wolfchat) in which they can discuss their strategy and who they want to kill during the night phase.

Every player will have a secret chatroom in which they can ask the moderator questions that they do not want to ask in the public thread. This chatroom is also used to submit orders for those who have them.

It is strictly forbidden for players to contact other players outside of the public thread or the above mentioned chatroom for max Evil players regarding the exchange of information vital to the game in progress. Exceptions to this rule are possible (in case of mason roles) but will be explicitly explained in the rules post for a specific game.

Basically, this is all there is to playing Werewolf. However, learning how to play it well will take some time and lots of experience. There are many different strategies found in Werewolf as well as different types of play. A player could, for instance, focus on analyzing other players' past votes or instead they may play the game entirely based on gut feeling or a combination of the two. Every type of role will also demand a playing style that differs from the next.

1.5 Moderation

A game of werewolf can only function with the help of a moderator. The moderator is a non-player who knows all the roles and carries out the orders that players give during the game. The moderator is also in charge of dawn and dusk and will post the results of the lynches and nightkills in the thread. Usually the moderator is also the one who designed the role set and/or the theme for the game. Some of the more basic games are sometimes moderated through a script instead of a human. These games are called auto-mods. It should be noted that since there is no human moderator present in these games, auto-mods are not optimally suited for new players.


2 - The Cassandra Project

The Cassandra Project (usually abbreviated as Cassy or Cassie) is a website made by Melsana and jmilum. Cassy is used as a supplement for nearly all werewolf games played on BoardGameGeek. Cassy is used to create the chatrooms needed for games, logs the orders for roles (like kills and views) and tallies votes at specific time intervals during the day phase of a game. It is also used to keep track of all kinds of information on games and players.

2.1 Registration

To play werewolf on BoardGameGeek, you need to register an account on The Cassandra Project. Registration is free and your account will be protected through an encrypted password that will be sent to your geekmail account and can be changed to something easier to remember. Your username on Cassy will be the same as your BGG username.

In order to register, please visit http://cassandrawerewolf.com/signup.php

The Cassy website can be found here: http://cassandrawerewolf.com/

2.2 Ready to Play?

Once signed in, you can then view any of the game pages listed in the "Games In Sign-up" table by simply clicking on the title of the game. If you want to sign-up for a specific game click on the "Sign Me Up!!!" link and the moderator will be notified of your interest. If there is no "Sign Me Up!!!" link then the game has already reached maximum capacity. Each game has an icon next to it to reflect the difficulty of the game. The explanation of each icon can be found at the bottom of the list of games in sign-up. For new users a game with 'noob' or 'low' complexity is recommended to get used to the system.
For ease of reference: Two of the normal, standard speed game sets that are encouraged for players new to Werewolf are the "Hi, I want to play werewolf online" series run by linguistfromhell and the "Single Serving" set moderated by redshark92.

2.3 The Game Page

Once a game has started, the Cassy game page for that game will be updated by the moderator and you will be able to see your role and alignment for the game. There will also be a few links on the game page. The most important link is 'Cassandra Communication System'. After you click on this link you will find yourself on another page that is home to all of the chatrooms that you will be part of in the game. Every player will at least have a 'modchat'. This chatroom is between you and the moderator of the game and is open 24/7 until the game finishes. Here you can ask the moderator all kinds of questions you have on the game in progress that you do not want to ask in the public game thread.

On the communications page, you will also find a tab called "Game Orders". This is the tool that you need to use to execute the actions that your role has in the game (if any). There can be up to three boxes under "Game Orders". The first box contains all the actions you can do, like 'kill' or 'view'. The second box is a drop-down menu that contains all of the possible targets (players) for your action. Sometimes there is a third box, which you can used to add additional information about the action you want to perform in case of advanced roles with unusual actions.

It is important to make sure that you enter your game orders in Cassy before any applicable deadlines. Those deadlines are either posted in the public thread or in your modchat. If you fail to enter a game order before the deadline it will either not be executed or a random target will be chosen, depending on the policy of the moderator.

Other information that can be found on the game page includes links to the vote tallies and vote log for your game, the current status of the game and lynch and night action deadlines, as well as information on the timezones of the players in the game.

Every post made in the public thread of a game is logged by Cassy and can be viewed even if BoardGameGeek is offline. If you click on the number of total posts at the top of the player list you will be forwarded to a page that has every post from every player in chronological order. You can also view all posts by a specific player in the game by clicking on the number of posts besides their name in the player list.

If you click on the name of a player you will be forwarded to their personal page to see information about that player. This includes # of games played and moderated, win/loss rates and other statistics. Through the player pages you can also view every post a player has made in any game ever in the history of BGG WW.

After a game is finished all of the roles will become visible on the game page and every chatroom from every player will also become public through the 'Cassandra Communication System' link, unless the moderator decided to delete them.

Once a game has finished, you can make a comment on the game if you click on the total number of games you played which is displayed on your personal Cassy page.

2.4 Miscellaneous Functions

On the Cassy main page you will find a list with other abilities. These are the features that do not directly have anything to do with a specific game but are useful, interesting and fun nonetheless. Amongst these is 24/7 group chat, a page to look at statistics from past games, a list to find our Wolves of the Week threads, as well as several other small tools.

The Cassandra Project is constantly changing and improving. If you have ideas for improvement, send a mail to Cassandra.project@gmail.com. You can always see what the newest feature of Cassy is by looking at the change log (available at the bottom of the main Cassandra page).


3 - Werewolf Etiquette

We do not have a set list of etiquette rules that one should always follow. We expect every player to have a good sense of do's and don'ts and they do not differ from the next available forum. We also assume that most players are of age and able to handle grown discussions. If you are a minor and want to play, you are still welcome, but it may be a good idea to notify the players in the game that you're joining so everyone knows what to expect. A number of games will feature some strong language as well as sexual innuendo, not to mention gruesome death scenes of villagers that fell prey to the werewolves. It is always a good idea to read a few games before you join one to get a taste of how we play.

Aside from that, a few things are important. Sportsmanship and believing in fair play are essential. Breaking the letter or spirit of a rule will not be appreciated. If you are in doubt, just ask your moderator. Also remember that you are still required to follow BoardGameGeek's community rules.

Participation is key. If you are not able to check into a game that you are signed up for then you might want to reconsider joining it. A good minimum rule of thumb is that you should at least be able to post once each day during a game. But more participation makes for a better game. Remember that moderators and players put time and effort into their games and a lack of participation affects everyone involved.
Obviously, real life always trumps online games and if, for any reason, you aren’t able to play anymore, there is an easy-to-use replacement system in Cassy. To ask for a replacement, go to the game page of your game and click on the arrow button in front of your name. This will prompt Cassy to post a message in the thread that you are looking for a replacement. If you wish to replace someone yourself, you can also click on the arrow button, but this time in front of the name of the player that you wish to replace. It is always better to ask for a replacement yourself then to just disappear, if possible.

When not playing in a specific game or after you have died in that game you should refrain from posting in that game's public thread. There are some exceptions. A non-player may be able to provide valuable information on an issue in a game from a purely neutral point of view, like explaining a confusing technical detail. This is usually done by using the ninja emoticons as a 'tag' for a post. Posting after you’re dead is mostly frowned upon but some moderators will allow one post after you died, saying (as an example) "That sucks" or “Good luck Team!”. If you do make such a post you should use the zombie emoticons as a tag. If you're in doubt whether you can ninja or zombie post, then just don't do it. It is also important to mention that dead players should not thumb posts that may indicate whether you agree or disagree with something that was said that has an effect on the game. Generally speaking: do not influence a game in progress that you are not part of (anymore) in any way. It's better to wait till it has finished so you can speak your thoughts during the post-game discussion.

Making out-of-game promises to other players in order to influence their actions in a game is against the rules; so is quoting something told to you by the moderator directly from your hidden modchat, unless the rules of a game specifically say otherwise or the moderator has given you explicit permission. Paraphrasing such things is usually allowed.

Using any form of encryption is usually frowned upon but not always forbidden. If you want to use encryption it is strongly advised to ask the moderator if you are allowed to do so. If you are and do use it, you may still be confronted with players that dislike it.

Asking a moderator questions in the public thread of a game is usually done by using the color red to make your question stand out so the Moderator will easily spot it.


4 - Frequently Asked Questions

Can I edit a post?

Players are discouraged from editing posts made during a game for reasons of fairplay. If you do think you need to edit a post, make sure that you state the reason for the edit at the bottom of your post. Once Cassy has scanned your original post, any edits you make after that will not show up when browsing the post on the Cassy game page. Most importantly, a vote that was cast in a post that was edited will not be valid and will therefore not be tallied by Cassy.

What does nightfall mean?

When you nightfall, your vote you lock your current vote for the day. Nightfalling your vote is usually only done when the majority of the players have agreed on who needs to be lynched that day and it is highly unlikely that new information will surface that will change the opinion of players. If a majority of the players nightfalls their vote in such a way that the remaining players cannot change the outcome of the lynch anymore, the moderator may call dusk early. To nightfall your vote post [Vote Nightfall] in the thread. Nightfalling is irreversible. Be aware that nightfalling prematurely may be frowned upon by other players and could therefore make your actions suspect.

What does locking your actions mean?

In Cassy, you have the option to lock your actions. Locking your actions is the night equivalent of Nightfalling. When you lock your actions you cannot change your night orders anymore that night. If every player locks their actions, the moderator may call dawn early. Note that every living player has to do this, even those players that do not actually have night orders.

Can I read chats in Cassy after the game is finished?

Usually every chat that was used in a game will become available to the public after the moderator has set the game to finished in Cassy. However, some moderators choose to delete some or all of the chats before finishing the game. When you moderate a game and you plan to delete chats after the game ended, it is recommended to make note of this in your sign-up post. If you are a player and would like your chat(s) deleted before the game is set to finished, you should ask the moderator of the game to do this for you.

What does FUD mean?

FUD stands for Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt. FUD is a general term for the lies and misinformation spread by the Evil team in an effort to cause the Good team to make mistakes. In recent years the term has evolved into a verb, to fud, that sees use in almost every game of Werewolf played on this forum. Fudding is usually the domain of the aux evils in a game, since spreading lies and misinformation can essentially come back to haunt a player. Aux evils that don't count for evil parity will normally find that the advantages of fudding outweigh the disadvantages of being caught. Sometimes bold wolves will also fud the village instead of trying to fly under the radar or look as innocent as possible, and on occasion players on Good or Neutral teams also feel the need to resort to fudding.

What is metagaming?

Metagaming means that information, situations, discussions and arguments as well as specific strategies carry on from one game to another. A meta vote is a vote made for previous-game or out-of-game reasons, and is often a player's first vote. For instance; if you beat me in the last game I might decide to vote for you on day 1 in the next game 'as revenge'. Usually this is done tongue-in-cheek and will not make a big impact on the eventual lynch since everyone knows that there is no relation between your role in the last game and your role in this game and so those votes usually don't stick. It gets more interesting when I vote you in this game because I noticed your current behavior resembles your behavior in earlier games when you were a wolf. Both types of metagaming happen a lot on BGG WW and it can be a big advantage too. Some clever metagaming has won games in the past. For newer players, who are naturally without metagame information, this can be a little hard to get used too. But if you stick around you will eventually develop insights of your own to be used to your advantage in games to come.

What is Helenus Project?

Helenus Project is a tool created by Avin that resembles the Cassy Auto-tally System. Whereas Cassy tallies lynch votes, Helenus can be prepped to tally a myriad of other things. Helenus is usually only found in more advanced games that make use of game systematics not found in basic games, like missions or elections, etc. If a game uses Helenus, your moderator will explain how you need to operate this tool.

Can I vote for myself?

Yes, you can. It is technically possible to make a vote for yourself that counts, as Cassy will definitely tally it. If you are not allowed to self-vote it will be explicitly stated in the rules of that game, which almost never happens. It may be a good idea to self-vote in a few very specific situations. The most common of those situations is a game that has a majority of Evil players but no parity yet for the Max Evils. For instance the situation where there are 5 players left; 2 wolves, 1 aux evil (the sorcerer is one example) and 2 villagers. In this case, the evils have control of the vote but since there are 3 players that count against evil parity (the 2 villagers + the sorcerer), the game has not ended yet. If, in this scenario, the sorcerer knows what roles are left in the game he or she could self-vote. Then both wolves can also vote for the sorcerer which will result in the sorcerer's lynch, leaving 4 players of which 2 are max evils and thus evil reaches parity and wins. This scenario and similar ones don't happen often but they certainly aren't rare either.
Other less strategical reasons for self-voting, like frustration or being bored, will usually not be met with pleasant reactions from other players.

What is sniping?

Sniping is the action of voting for a player very close to the dusk deadline without having previously announced any sort of suspicion for that player. Since it is very close to the deadline it leaves little to no room for other players to react to it. It is usually, but not exclusively, done by evil players that feel that a correct snipe will win them the game. It should be noted that not all close to dusk votes are technically snipes as the general flow of the game may be changing rapidly just before lynch if new information becomes public because of late claims or statements made. Be advised though that opinions sometimes differ on what constitutes a snipe and what does not. Basically, if you make a really late vote you should expect some scrutiny.
A different type of sniping is placing a vote as fast as you can after dawn. This is usually done in situations where there is an even number of players left during the day phase (which is uncommon in basic games.) Since the number is even, there may at some point be a situation where the number of evils (max + aux) equals the number of goods left in the game and in such a case it is likely that a tiebreaker will decide the lynch between an evil player and a good player and ultimately decide the outcome of the game. If the tiebreaker is LHV (Longest Held Vote), an early snipe could make the deciding tie vote and thus win the game. This situation is pretty uncommon.


5 - Advanced Games

So, what’s in store for you if you decide to continue playing after the first few basic games?

On BoardGameGeek, the game of Werewolf has evolved into something vastly exceeding the initial basic idea behind the game. We play advanced games that have all sorts of new game mechanics attached to the basic game as well as an unlimited assortment of different roles and various big themes. Here’s a little preview of things you can expect:

5.1 Theme

From time to time, games are played that are flavor-heavy and are based on well-known themes like certain movies, books, TV shows, other games and anything else you can imagine. Famous examples are the Lord of the Rings games, Narnia, Dune, Heroes, Blade Runner, Diablo, Harry Potter, Survivor, the Lorax, Aliens, The Matrix and many others. In addition, some mods think up entire themes of their own for their games (Domino Effect is a very good example). If you have some time to spare, take a look and you will be impressed by all the creativity that this community has been putting out.

5.2 Setup

There are two major changes to the basic setup of a game of Werewolf that see a lot of play on this forum. The first one is ‘no role reveal’. Normally in a game, the mod will reveal the roles of the players that died, however this is not always the case. A significant number of games do not have role reveal by default but instead make use of priest roles. A priest is a role that either secretly learns the roles of the deceased in his or her modchat or that provides (partial) role reveal while remaining alive in the game. The other change is ‘hidden roles’. In a hidden roles game the rules will not provide information on what roles are present in the game which means you can expect anything to be out there. These games are sometimes difficult and chaotic to play and tend to favor the Evil Team a little because the Good players cannot analyze things from within a set frame of rules and roles. To account for this, hidden roles games usually have a specific logical setup running behind the scenes which the players are theoretically able to figure out based on the information they receive during the game. For instance a hidden roles game may consist of a large group of identical role pairs that has one player playing that role for evil and the other playing it for good. A variant to hidden roles is the semi-hidden roles setup. In these types of games all, or almost all, roles that can potentially be in the game are given at the start of the game but a significant number of those roles are not actually in the game.

5.3 Roles

Most non-basic games will feature all kinds of different roles, sometimes very unique and thematic like the Witch from Narnia who could stone other players, preventing them from participating until freed, and sometimes a bit more generic to spice up an otherwise basic game, like the normal Witch role that gets to block the night actions of other players.

5.4 Teams

Some games have more teams than just basic Good and Evil. The most common example for this are neutrals. Neutral players are usually only aligned with themselves or with a small number of other neutrals. These players will have a victory condition that is different from reaching parity or killing all max evils and may be anything you can think of, like the goal to get several specific players lynched or trying to survive to the end of the game. Sometimes a player even has several different VC options to choose from. The interesting thing about neutral players is that in a significant number of games where they are present they will at some point decide to side with either the Good or Evil team depending on who they think will help them further their goal. This adds an interesting dynamic to the game as the basic teams will obviously want to try and win the neutrals for their cause which means there is another battle going on between Good and Evil aside from trying to eliminate each other.
There are also games that have two evil teams instead of one, for instance, Vampires in addition to Werewolves.

5.5 Attributes

Attributes are small additions to a role that make that role stronger (or weaker) than normal. The most used attributes are tough (this role survives one lynch or nightkill), brutal (this role gets to kill another player on death) and tinker (this role will make anyone trying to view him or her receive an inverted view). But there are countless other possibilities for attributes as well.

5.6 Mechanics

There are lots of complex mechanics that can be in effect in games. One kind of example is vote manipulation. An example of this is the Werewolf with the charismatic attribute whose votes always count double or the Mayor who, once per game, can decide who the lynch victim will be on his own. Another common mechanic is conversion, where a specific in-game action can cause the alignment (good, evil or neutral) of a player to be changed while the game is in progress. Then there are games that make use of roleplaying mechanics. Roles may be given physical characteristics like health, strength, armor and similar things which determines what those roles can and can’t do in a game. The most advanced games even have missions that the players have to complete in order to gain awards or prevent disaster. Of course, evil teams may try to sabotage those missions. Finally there are games that use puzzles as a mechanic, either as an addition and an extra way to win the game or as something that players need to collectively figure out to be able to win the game.

5.7 Items

Use of items is pretty common in advanced games. Items are basically a way to temporarily change the rules of the game or a specific role a little. Their main advantage is the fact that they can be passed to other players or stolen, meaning that any advantage or disadvantage can switch from player to player during the game which adds more dynamic. Items can add toughness, obscure role reveal, give views, give an extra vote, or cancel your vote, etc. An interesting example of a very item-heavy game is Haunted Village of which several editions have been played over the years.

5.8 Locations

Finally, some games make use of locations. Locations are a means of limiting specific constant effects to a certain group of players. For instance communication between players could be limited to those that are in the same location. Sometimes this will mean that there are several main threads for one game running at the same time. Recently the Cassandra Physics System has been introduced to better help moderate games with lots of locations and/or items. To read more about this visit the link that is provided at the end of this guide.


-------------------------------



After having read this guide, you should be able to jump in and join a game of Werewolf. If you still have questions, feel free to post them in this thread or send a geekmail to another player. We're glad to help you get started. There are a number of players / moderators who like to get involved and they'll take the time to help you through every phase of the game.

Have fun but please don't go outside when the moon is full!

For further reading I'd like to direct you to:

BGG Werewolf tools:

BGG Werewolf Role List
BGG Werewolf PBF Dictionary
Werewolf Mechanics References
WW Game Development Queue
BGG Werewolf Modding Guide
The guide to using subgames / subthreads in Cassandra
The functionality of the Cassandra Physics System
The Guide to Werewolf Balancing
All you need to know about playing and modding Werewolf on BGG!
How to get started playing Werewolf!

BGG Werewolf Community:

The most recent player and moderator survey (2014)
The previous player and moderator survey (2012)
Get to know your fellow Werewolfers!
Pictures of WW Players
The Chit-Chat thread!
  • [+] Dice rolls
. .
United States
.
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
Looks awesome. Well-done, and nicely timed to a (hopeful) influx of new blood after BGG.con.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This is great! Thanks snaak!

Just one suggestion if I may; under 1.1 add something like:

"Players may win even if they are eliminated. If their team wins, all eliminated players on that team also win."
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Oh Captain! My Captain!
Denmark
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Snaak wrote:
GrimJester wrote:
This is great! Thanks snaak!

Just one suggestion if I may; under 1.1 add something like:

"Players may win even if they are eliminated. If their team wins, all eliminated players on that team also win."

Thank you!

Also a good suggestion. Actually I probably need to emphasize the team game aspect of WW some more, overall.

I will do the updates when I have some time to think about how to fit them in correctly but I'm a bit busy at the moment.
And one (somewhat at least) that note, I also think there should be some further elaboration on neutrals, maybe suggest some games that have used neutrals or something. Of course that all depends on how high you want to lift the level considering it's supposed to be a newbie guide.

Other than nice, nice work!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Can you put a link to cassy at the top of the post? It would be convenient for me, although I don't know about others. And yes, I'm aware of bookmarking etc. I have my reasons

Vox
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ludes
United States
Honor
Michigan
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb


Quote:
A good rule of thumb is that you should at least be able to post once each day during a game.

I think this should be changed to reflect that once each day should be the extreme exception rather than standard operating procedure.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Wilson
United Kingdom
Bristol
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Possibly just rephrase 'at least once per day' to 'once per day at a minimum'? Or add 'and preferably more often'?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Wilson
United Kingdom
Bristol
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Snaak wrote:
Isn't that two ways of saying exactly the same thing?

Logically speaking, yes, but the connotations are different. In the same way, people are more likely to obey a sign that says "never mix cottons and synthetics" than a sign that says "always separate cottons and synthetics", even though they say the same thing.

Snaak wrote:
It currently says 'But more participation makes for a better game'

I think changing:

"A good rule of thumb is that you should at least be able to post once each day during a game. But more participation makes for a better game."

to

"A good rule of thumb is that you should be able to post at least once each day during a game, and preferably more often. More participation makes for a better game."

just emphasises the point a little more.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Oh Captain! My Captain!
Denmark
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
I really wanted to vote 20 times, but I voted 5. 5 posts equals posting every 5 hour. And then I also go by +/-10% and five hours is 18000 seconds which is then 19800 (5,5 hours) or 16200 seconds (4.5 hours) - so that should be somewhat doable.

I'm dissapointed I'm lodged in with what the majority of feelings though.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kristie Satterly
United States
Guffey
Colorado
flag msg tools
Run you clever boy, and REMEMBER!
badge
Well behaved women, seldom make history.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I put 10-15, but that is based on the short posts I see many use. If there is real content then 1-5 is actually fine, It is hard to put a number because it depends on the person and their posting style.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Snaak wrote:
Vox_Dargard wrote:
Can you put a link to cassy at the top of the post? It would be convenient for me, although I don't know about others. And yes, I'm aware of bookmarking etc. I have my reasons

Vox

The link is already there, under "2.1 Registration."

Yep, I saw it there. I'm lazy and was asking for it to be put closer to the top so I don't have to scroll so far. Cause... I'm lazy but can't make use of other methods of laziness.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
kristiefix wrote:
I put 10-15, but that is based on the short posts I see many use. If there is real content then 1-5 is actually fine, It is hard to put a number because it depends on the person and their posting style.

Agreed. It depends a lot on the person. It also depends on other people. Posting once in a game with low activity is enough, posting once in a game with high activity is frustrating. I picked the 10-15 category because I would rather see people prompted to post more than encouraged to post less.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian Thomas
United States
Herndon
Virginia
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmb
I think it depends heavily on the game, the position within the game, and on the other players.

If the Day 1 lynch is completely random, I will probably post twice - once to put up some thoughts on the ruleset (if necessary), and once to vote. If there is no compelling reason to think my vote is correct, I probably would let it go at that. So there are situations where I could see 2 posts (maybe just 1) being acceptable.

Of course, if it's a random Day 1, I'm probably going to vote for whoever puts up a single post with a random vote. So even though it might be acceptable, you should still expect it to get you voted off.

If the game is more complicated, or if it's further in, I expect more than 1 or 2 posts a day. I voted for 3, but even there, if it's just chit-chatty type stuff and a random vote, it's not acceptable.

The conclusion here is that I want to see my fellow players putting a little effort in to actually play the game. That's why you sign up. Anything less is unacceptable. Some may take a more active role in playing, and some a less active role, but you need to be trying to win, trying to drive the game forward, and not just sitting in the stands and watching - if you want to watch, you can do that without signing up.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Josh Bailey
United States
Hendersonville
North Carolina
flag msg tools
badge
That's what thon said.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I voted for at least 3 before seeing it was the lynch-leader, so don't call me out for jumping on the wagon.

I base that on the idea that you should always vote (1 post), reply to someone's questioning of you (2 posts), and be prepared to move in response to a claim or otherwise change or affirm your vote shortly before lynch (3 posts). Anything less than that and I think you are not upholding your obligations to playing the game you signed up for.

I can't think of any standard WW game in which 1 post per day would cut it for me. And the worst part of low-participation is that I have hangups about lynching someone simply for not posting. So it's bad for everyone.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian
United States
California
flag msg tools
Enter Text Here
badge
[b][Vote :goo:][/b]
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Snaak wrote:
Can I vote for myself?

Yes you can. It is technically possible to make a vote for yourself that counts, as Cassy will definitely tally it. If you are not allowed to self-vote it will be explicitly stated in the rules of that game, which almost never happens. It may be a good idea to self-vote in a few very specific situations. The most common of those situations is a game that has a minority of Evil players but no parity yet for the Max Evils. For instance the situation where there are 5 players left; 2 wolves, 1 aux evil (for instance the sorcerer) and 2 villagers. In this case the evils have control of the vote but since there are 3 players that count against evil parity (the 2 villagers + the sorcerer) the game has not ended yet. If in this scenario the sorcerer knows what roles are left in the game he or she could self-vote. Then both wolves can also vote for the sorcerer which will result in the sorcerer's lynch, leaving 4 players of which 2 are max evils and thus evil reaches parity and wins. Note that the sorcerer will probably have to nightfall his vote on himself to prove to the wolves that he is indeed the sorcerer before they follow him. This scenario and similar ones don't happen often but they certainly aren't rare either.
Other less strategical reasons for self-voting, like frustration or being bored, will usually not be met with pleasant reactions from other players.
Snaak wrote:
The most common of those situations is a game that has a minority of Evil players but no parity yet for the Max Evils.
That is all.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Wilson
United Kingdom
Bristol
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Is it worth mentioning the hunter/wolf/villager self-vote situation as well, or is that too uncommon?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan Corrin
Canada
Kitchener
Ontario
flag msg tools
Traveller Werewolf - more games planned
badge
Still have werewolf games in sign-up.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Snaak wrote:
BlackSheep wrote:
Is it worth mentioning the hunter/wolf/villager self-vote situation as well, or is that too uncommon?

No, I think that one could be in. If only because I'm a really big fan of hunter wins. (An achievement i'm still lacking after 215 games. soblue )

That is an idea. I wonder how we could do achievement badges from "Won as Good" or "Hunter Victory" to "Played in 50 games" or so on... Perhaps Cassie could do something?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mystery McMysteryface
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Where on the WW forums can I find out if certain themes have been used/or request a theme (if it hasn't been used)?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Millersville
Maryland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
EgorjLileli wrote:
Where on the WW forums can I find out if certain themes have been used/or request a theme (if it hasn't been used)?

I think the easiest most complete place would be to just look at the list of all the games played http://www.thecassandraproject.org/jeremy/werewolf/show_game... Most of the themes are clearly identified in the titles of the game. Other than that, I don't think there is really a good complete or easy to search source.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mystery McMysteryface
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Melsana wrote:
EgorjLileli wrote:
Where on the WW forums can I find out if certain themes have been used/or request a theme (if it hasn't been used)?

I think the easiest most complete place would be to just look at the list of all the games played http://www.thecassandraproject.org/jeremy/werewolf/show_game... Most of the themes are clearly identified in the titles of the game. Other than that, I don't think there is really a good complete or easy to search source.

Thanks, Melsana.

//off to check the list on Cassy
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg Wilson
United Kingdom
Bristol
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Questions and requests in the Game Development thread would probably work.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Avin Fernando
United States
Pittsburgh
PA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
Hey Snaak,

Could you include a link to the Guide to Subgames/subthreads I just wrote up? I've heard a few people ask questions about these recently so I thought it would be useful to document it somewhere, even though they've been around forever.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Elia - "Rainbow Hippie" Acca
Italy
Bergamo
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Snaak wrote:
Can I vote for myself?

Yes you can. It is technically possible to make a vote for yourself that counts, as Cassy will definitely tally it. If you are not allowed to self-vote it will be explicitly stated in the rules of that game, which almost never happens. It may be a good idea to self-vote in a few very specific situations. The most common of those situations is a game that has a minority of Evil players but no parity yet for the Max Evils. For instance the situation where there are 5 players left; 2 wolves, 1 aux evil (for instance the sorcerer) and 2 villagers. In this case the evils have control of the vote but since there are 3 players that count against evil parity (the 2 villagers + the sorcerer) the game has not ended yet. If in this scenario the sorcerer knows what roles are left in the game he or she could self-vote. Then both wolves can also vote for the sorcerer which will result in the sorcerer's lynch, leaving 4 players of which 2 are max evils and thus evil reaches parity and wins. Note that the sorcerer will probably have to nightfall his vote on himself to prove to the wolves that he is indeed the sorcerer before they follow him. This scenario and similar ones don't happen often but they certainly aren't rare either.
Other less strategical reasons for self-voting, like frustration or being bored, will usually not be met with pleasant reactions from other players.

MMh... shouldn't this be majority?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
West Linn
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hmm now I own the last post on the top 5 threads on the Werewolf page. This is the uber Spell of Power.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian
United States
California
flag msg tools
Enter Text Here
badge
[b][Vote :goo:][/b]
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The werewolf podcast has been added to BGG, and the podcast thread moved to the podcast's own forum. Can we add a link to the podcast to the first post of this thread?

Thanks!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2 , 3 , 4  Next »   |