Recommend
66 
 Thumb up
 Hide
32 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Germantown» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Another excellent offering in an excellent series rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Germantown is the 7th installment in Mark Miklos’ highly regarded Battles of the American Revolution series. It follows Saratoga, Brandywine, Guilford, Savannah, Monmouth, and Pensacola.


Details:

Germantown is a hex-and-counter war game for 2 players. The game only has one scenario, and it takes about 2-3 hours to play. Mark Miklos and Bill Madison are the designers. GMT published it in 2010.


Background:

The game simulates the October 4, 1777 battle at Germantown, PA, outside of Philadelphia. That fall, the British had managed to successfully march on the American capital of Philadelphia after defeating the Continental Army at the battle of Brandywine Creek. British General William Howe bivouacked about 9,000 troops outside of Philadelphia at Germantown. American General George Washington had about 11,000 troops (continental regulars and militia) and was determined to execute a surprise attack on the British and Hessians. His plan called for a complex coordinated 4-pronged attack. However, this was too difficult for an untrained army, combined with bad directions and thick fog, resulted in General Nathanael Greene’s column arriving 30 minutes late.

The thick fog on the morning of the 4th created difficulty for the American troops, but also masked their advance. General Sullivan’s column quickly overran the British light infantry, who ran for cover in the Chew House, a large stone mansion. Believing the Americans were giving no quarter after the Paoli massacre, the British reinforced the lower entry points and put their best marksman on the upper floor.

The Americans could not take it quickly, and rather than go around it, Washington followed bad advice from General Henry Knox, and devoted too many troops to trying to take it. The American cannons could not penetrate the walls and attempts to storm the house resulted in carnage. To make matters worse, Major-General Adam Stephen was drunk, and when he heard shooting coming from the west, he ordered his troops to advance in that direction. General Anthony Wayne halted his progress and turned around when he heard shots behind him. He feared Sullivan’s division was in trouble, and went back to rescue him, and he arrived at the same time as Stephen’s troops. The thick fog created a friendly-fire catastrophe and panic.

On another front, Colonel George Matthew’s regiment had so much success that they went far behind the enemy lines before running out of ammunition and getting captured.

The American plan was bold and daring, but a few bad circumstances and decisions resulted in a defeat. Most of the troops escaped the battlefield and remained in high spirits because they had fought so bravely and well. They had come a long way since 12 months before, when they were routed in New York and chased across the New Jersey countryside.


Components:

Like the other games in this series, this game comes with two black-and-white rulebooks, both 8.5" x 11". One rulebook is the series rulebook, which explains the mechanics and rules common to all of the games in the series. The second rulebook is an exclusive rulebook. It contains 7 pages of rules specific to this game, along with a counter inventory and historical background. The rules are well-illustrated and clearly explained with plenty of examples.

The map is an attractive 22" x 34" full color paper map that displays the battlefield with a numbered hexagonal grid laid over the map. The map also contains various tables (fog and Stephen’s random marching directions), along with a turn chart and a morale tracker and boxes for placing captured and eliminated counters.



The game includes 176 1/2" cardboard counters representing various leaders, armies, dragoon, and artillery units, along with counters seen in many of the other games in this series: such as counters for pinned, disrupted, and shattered units, along with markers for turn and fog, and momentum chits. The counters are attractive with an attention to detail. Typical of the games in this series, this includes a few counters for one of the earlier games -- in this case, Brandywine, where a few counters have been updated to correct uniform specs.



Along with the tactics chits used in this series, this game also offers cards with the same tactics.

The game also includes a pair of double-sided charts (one for each player), and the rules for using tactics chits in solitaire play.


Objective of Play:

Each of the games in this series offers conditions of victory at various levels, such as a decisive victory, substantial victory, and marginal victory. These usually involve eliminating a certain number of strength points, and/or capturing certain hexes, or could be obtained by demoralizing the morale of the opposing army. This game is no different. In this case, the key hexes are the Chew House, the Market Square, and the edge of the map (the road to Philadelphia).


Overview of Play:

If you have played any of the games in this series, then you know how to play 90% of this game. The basic game turn consists of:
1) Fog Check: on certain turns, check for the density level of the fog.
2) Stephen’s Movement: Roll a die and move Stephen’s units the maximum amount in that direction.
3) Friendly Fire Check: if Stephen’s units end up in the same hex or adjacent to another American unit, roll on the friendly fire table. If friendly fire occurs, this step no longer occurs, but panic occurs among those units.
4) Movement Phase: Rules are the same as the series rules with the exception of movement in dense fog.
5) Rally Phase: any disrupted, shattered, or panicked units may attempt to rally.
6) Rifle Phase: Same as the series rules.
7) Defensive Artillery Fire Phase: same as series rules, except a part of the game has been abstracted to show the American militia bombardment across the Schuylkill River. If any British/Hessian units are in a certain region of the map, then the Americans fire on the artillery chart.
8) Close combat Phase: Series rules apply, but there are new rules for the American vanguard’s surprise attacks, General “Mad Anthony” Wayne’s units seeking revenge for the Paoli massacre, and special units that act as a mix of musket and rifle regiments.
9) Check for victory conditions.


Results:

This game works as well as the others in the series. By this point, if you have played the others, you know what you are getting: the mechanics and tactics are solid. You know to always leave your retreat paths open and never let the enemy get your units into a semi-surrounded position, where your units may retreat into their zone-of-control (automatic capture).

This game has its little twists and turns, just like the others. Stephen and the friendly fire rules create variability in the game, and hence, repeatability.

Some may be turned off by the game having one scenario. To me, this has never been an issue. We all play war games because we want to see if we could do things better or worse. With that said, there are many “what ifs” to try in this game. They come via house rules, but are certainly worth investigating. For instance:

• What if there was no fog or what if there was only light fog on that day?
• What if the four American columns actually converged at the same time?
• What if Stephen had not been drunk?
• What if Washington had ignored Knox’ advice and by-passed the Chew House?

And speaking of the Chew House, I disagree with the rule that says it is worth 1 VP to the British player if he holds it at the end of the game. The result is that the American player, like Washington, will waste forces trying to take it. However, it had no strategic significance, and the rule appears to be there to create a more realistic simulation. However, I believe it should be an optional rule.

As for the tactic chits, it is nice that the rules for solitaire play are there, but I have never liked them and refuse to use them. To me, they are nothing but “rock-paper-scissors” in order to gain a die roll modifier, and require no special skill other than out-guessing your opponent (kind of like playing a game of Battleship). The die creates enough variability without this unnecessary guessing game/time-waster. I guess it’s a matter of personal preference, and the tactics do follow those used in 18th century warfare, but I find the tactics used in We the People Battle Cards to be a better teaching tool.

Conclusion:

Before I even ordered the game, I knew I was going to like it, so I was not disappointed. The bigger question is: how does it compare to the others in the series and should you buy it?

I have played five of the seven games in the series. I own Savannah, but have not played it yet. I do not own Pensacola (call me funny, but I want the Continental Army in my American Revolution game, not the Spanish vs. British). With that said, I rate them this way:

#1) Monmouth – large counter density, C+C breakdown table, and wide-open space creates the most variability from game to game. This battle is the most balanced between the two sides. I rate it a 10.

#2) Germantown – Wide open battlefield and rules for Stephen’s shame, friendly fire, and panic create the second most variability. The Americans actually have the advantage in troop strength.

#3) Brandywine – Multiple entry points at the Brandywine river creates a level of variability, but not nearly as much as Monmouth or Germantown, and ultimately, the Americans are going to lose: the British just have too many numbers. I rate it a 9.

#4) Saratoga – The big question in this game is when will Gates’ wing release? It’s a great game, but every game is pretty much the same: a slugfest at Freeman’s Farm. While this is historical, it’s not as fun as the others listed ahead of it. I rate it a solid 8.

#5) Guilford – Low counter density makes this one the ideal one to start with, (if you have the choice), in order to learn the mechanics. The battles tend to be a bit lop-sided, though. I rate it a 7.

The second question is the easier question: if you have tried the other games in the series, your answer is already determined. If you like them, you will like this. If you have never played any of them, then yes, you should give it a try. These games are excellent at portraying 18th century European battlefield tactics. The system is tried and true for 12 years. If you like hex-and-counter war games, then this is right up your alley. While I often recommend Guilford as a good starter game in the series, it is out-of-print and expensive. So with that said, this is as good of a place as any to start in this excellent series. The first couple of plays may be confusing, as you go back to the rulebook for clarification a lot. Also, it takes a bit of playing before the combat becomes intuitive, because the DRMs count for a lot more than the odds, and gains/losses in morale are paramount.

Overall, this is an excellent addition to an excellent series. I am tempted to give it a 10, because to me, it is significantly better than Brandywine, which is a solid 9. A more accurate rating would be 9.5, but I don’t do fractional ratings, so for now, I’ll stick with the 9, and see if it stands the test of time.
67 
 Thumb up
2.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jon
Canada
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
Nice review Judd.

Yet more games to add to our PBEM pantheon?
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob
United States
flag msg tools
Be sure to taste your words, before you spit them out.
badge
If you climb in the saddle, be ready for the ride.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent review Judd! thumbsup
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Capt_S wrote:
Nice review Judd.

Yet more games to add to our PBEM pantheon?


Sounds fun. If you haven't played any of these games, Guilford is the best one to start with. Usually the first time you play, it gets ugly quick, as you have to learn the hard way, ALWAYS protect your path of retreat.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Limerick! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Good review of a game I need to get sooner rather than later.

On a historical note, I've always felt that Washington was mostly to blame for this defeat. The plan was ambitious enough, but he kept the militia on the flanks, so achieving an envelopment was going to be impossible. Couple this with listening to Knox's advice on the Chew House, and you have a good opportunity going to waste. Still, it appears Washington pugnacity impressed many in France and helped get them into the war.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Iain K
United States
Arvada
Colorado
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
Thanks Judd. I appreciate that you balance your review with the discussion of aspects that are less than perfect in your opinion (Tactic chits & Chew House VP).
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Keith Mageau
United States
Summerville
South Carolina
flag msg tools
Check out my blog at www.rollingboxcars.com
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
For the record, Bill Madison is the designer. Mark is the series designer and did have input in this game as well, but Bill did most of the research I believe.

Almost forgot. Great review!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Warren Davis
United States
Jacksonville
Florida
flag msg tools
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm calling you funny. Pensacola may not have the Continental Army, but the results are no less important to the formation of our great nation. Furthermore, the citizens of Galveston will weigh in here too, as their city & island are named after the victorious Spanish general.

Also, it's better than the Continental Army did down South...


(OK, OK, I'm biased because I live in Florida, and I was the 500th order that Made the Cut at GMT. whistle )

I own all but Brandywine and Guilford/Eutaw Springs...shake
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Keith - thanks. I updated to show Bill's contribution. (I wondered how Mark was able to put out Pensacola and Germantown within a month of each other).

Warren - don't forget that Glen Campbell will weigh in, as he got his song title from the same guy

To tell the truth, I know next to nothing about the Pensacola battle. If I can find the Exclusive Rules for that game, I'll probably read the historical notes and the rules. I am actually open to getting the game, just because the entire series is so fun.
Besides, the game has intrigued me ever since someone pointed out that the cover looks like David Niven is leading the charge and Saul Tigh (Battlestar Galactica) is on his right.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bill Madison
United States
Powder Springs
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Thanks Keith. And thank you Judd for your fine review.

Enjoy the game!

Cheers
Bill M.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Timothy Phelps
United States
Canal Fulton
Ohio
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
airjudden wrote:
If I can find the Exclusive Rules for that game, I'll probably read the historical notes and the rules.


Here ya go...

http://www.gmtgames.com/living_rules/Pensacola_playbook.pdf
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Darn you!!! I downloaded and read the battle. Now I want to get the game. Sounds very interesting.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Norell
New Zealand
AUCKLAND
flag msg tools
mbmb
I must confess to being delighted with the BoAR system since first making a tentative venture with SAVANNAH. This I enjoyed mainly because it was a siege game - something I had never tried before. I realise that it is quite a static game by comparison to others, and is not recommended as an introduction to the series by some, but I am a hardened wargamer who often plays solitaire, so it was eminently suitable and got me hooked.

Since then I have bought, Monmouth and Pensacola, both of which I have played, and now, Germantown, which I am just about to play for the first time.

The main appeal to me of the BoAR series is that each battle provides a different set of problems to be encountered: Establishing and prosecuting a siege (Savannah & Pensacola); Heat and Confusion (Monmouth); and Fog (Germantown).

It's just a personal thing, but balance doesn't matter to me as much as being able to deal with the actual problems faced by the generals concerned. As one who likes to devise tabletop wargames where players are often surprised by specific problems other than fighting, BoAR has a great appeal.

I shall look forward to offering an opinion when I have played Germantown a few times.

Thanks to all concerned for such a great series.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kirk Hoffman

Huntsville
Alabama
msg tools
I really enjoy the BoAR series and this game is no exception - except this one seems to have a few more detail issues than others. An example is in the initial writeup Judd did. He must have gotten the turn sequence from the back of the game specific rules because he has the Rifle Fire and Defensive Artillery Fire Phases out of order. Also, the strange "vanguard" rule is discussed in another message string. Lastly, if you buy the game make sure to download and print the revised player aid card and game specific rule book. A number of significant items were changed/enhanced.

All in all a really nice game that has a few annoying detail issues that keep it from being a 10 out of 10.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
KirkH wrote:
An example is in the initial writeup Judd did. He must have gotten the turn sequence from the back of the game specific rules because he has the Rifle Fire and Defensive Artillery Fire Phases out of order. Lastly, if you buy the game make sure to download and print the revised player aid card and game specific rule book. A number of significant items were changed/enhanced.


You are right. When I wrote it, I was looking at the back. When I played it, I went from memory, because I have played enough of the games in the series to know the artillery comes first.

When I saw the updated rules, I downloaded them. They filled in all of the details for those who would be playing for the first time. For me, I had played enough of the games that I knew the rules, but it was nice of them to update them for others. It would be a pity for someone who bought this first and didn't know about the living rules. It would create unnecessary frustration and keep them from enjoying this game and probably keep them from trying out the others in the series. Darned shame.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Deverell
Australia
Melbourne
Victoria
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
As for the tactic chits...I have never liked them and refuse to use them. The die creates enough variability without this unnecessary guessing game/time-waster.


It's interesting that you find the tactics cards a bit of an annoying time waster Judd. I don't mind them (especially using the cards instead of chits) but I think my enjoyment of Monmouth was spoilt because of them. The chits seem to work better with smaller counter density, as you're playing them less - otherwise they do seem to be a bit repetative. You ranked Monmouth #1. I wonder if I should replay this without the chits?

However I wouldn't agree they are unnecessary. To gain a +2 modifier is significant for a d10 roll on top of other modifiers (especially in gaining momentum chits) and it increases the importance of leaders.

I was given this as a gift and looking forward to playing it. Always like smaller scenarios to go along with the game, but 2-3 hours is not too long for the main game.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm part of the "Rock, Paper, Scissors -- meh!" gang when it comes to this mechanic.

Some like it and some hate it. I never begrudge +2 DRM, but I'd like it to count for something skillful rather than the rock-paper-scissors guessing game. The die does a great enough job of creating unskilled variability. In other words, the best laid plans can backfire due to a bad roll. That is good enough for me. I don't need a bad die roll AND a loss of rock-paper-scissors to be the death of my plans.

Have you ever played We the People? I liked the use of tactics cards for deciding the battle. It had a random/guessing mechanism kind of like a die roll (such as that used in Washington's War), but the risks were calculated risk: if you won with a frontal attack, you lost 1 combat unit. If you won with a probe, the enemy lost 1 less unit. You knew there were more flanking attacks and less double envelopments in the deck, so you were always using a method to your madness.

Funny thing is that I don't buy C3i (I can't rationalize buying a magazine for as much as they charge when maybe 90% of the articles don't apply to me. I'd much rather pay a few bucks and download a specific article, but I digress). I really looked forward to Joel's solitaire system for chits. But once it was there for free in Germantown, and I tried it a couple of times, it still came back "this ain't nothing but rock paper scissors with a die determining the other guy's choice."

To each his own. Folks are pretty divided on the issue. Maybe if I played it F2F, rather than solo, I'd appreciate it more.

As far as Monmouth goes, the series mechanics are very solid. But as I played Saratoga, I noticed the games had a "sameness" to them. It was fun, but it was "Deja Vu all over again" to borrow the Yogi Berra phrase. Granted, because it is a slugfest at Freeman's Farm, it's a good thing because it's historical (note: I have the first edition -- no scenarios).

I liked Brandwine more, because you had 3 fronts, and that added variability.

Because of the C+C charts, Monmouth blows sameness right out of the water. Every game is different and there are so many "what ifs" to examine.

This game has variability -- not quite what Monmouth has, but more than the others in the series. That is why I like them better than the others.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Limerick! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
As far as Monmouth goes, the series mechanics are very solid. But as I played Saratoga, I noticed the games had a "sameness" to them. It was fun, but it was "Deja Vu all over again" to borrow the Yogi Berra phrase. Granted, because it is a slugfest at Freeman's Farm, it's a good thing because it's historical (note: I have the first edition -- no scenarios).


While I like Saratoga, I think it is the weakest one for the reason you've named: sameness. The first edition had no frills, and I think later games were better because they changed things up.

I think I need to get the new Saratoga game, since it has scenarios.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Freddy Dekker
Netherlands
Friesland
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Good to see I'm not the only one who doesn't like the tactic chits and thinks them a waste of time.
I to do not buy Ci3, for a few euros more I can buy me a new game so....
But I aggree it would be nice to have some other way of getting you hands on stuff that does interest you in them.

Like all them CC scenarioes.
Wonder why they not creat some kind of special magazine with specific stuff for one game and sell that instead.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
sagitar wrote:
Good to see I'm not the only one who doesn't like the tactic chits and thinks them a waste of time.
I to do not buy Ci3, for a few euros more I can buy me a new game so....
But I aggree it would be nice to have some other way of getting you hands on stuff that does interest you in them.

Like all them CC scenarioes.
Wonder why they not creat some kind of special magazine with specific stuff for one game and sell that instead.


They did it once: Paths of Glory Player's Guide.

They should do it for Empire of the Sun, but I asked them and they said nope.

If they posted the articles online, I would totally go for it and pay for the ones that interested me. Instead, most of the articles in a magazine are for games I don't own, so I never buy them.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rob Doane
United States
Walpole
MA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Good to see I'm not the only one who doesn't like the tactic chits and thinks them a waste of time.


Keep in mind that if you don't use the tactics chits, you are eliminating the possibility of an NC result on the tactics matrix. Normally that results in no combat taking place and the side that played the withdraw chit must retreat.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Freddy Dekker
Netherlands
Friesland
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
But if a unit advances on another, is no combat realistic?

Wich one is more fun germantown or pensacola?
Is pensacola like savannah, a siege game?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judd Vance
United States
Wichita
Kansas
flag msg tools
Every Man a (K-State) Wildcat!
badge
"Just get that sucka to the designated place at the designated time and I will gladly designate his ass...for dismemberment!" - Sho Nuff.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
rfdoane wrote:
Quote:
Good to see I'm not the only one who doesn't like the tactic chits and thinks them a waste of time.


Keep in mind that if you don't use the tactics chits, you are eliminating the possibility of an NC result on the tactics matrix. Normally that results in no combat taking place and the side that played the withdraw chit must retreat.


That is a good point. I think I would rather have the defender declare he wishes to withdraw and then roll a die to see if he succeeds, and if he fails, give the attacker a small DRM bump (like Washington's War), and skip all of the rest of the RPS.
1 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Limerick! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
airjudden wrote:
rfdoane wrote:
Quote:
Good to see I'm not the only one who doesn't like the tactic chits and thinks them a waste of time.


Keep in mind that if you don't use the tactics chits, you are eliminating the possibility of an NC result on the tactics matrix. Normally that results in no combat taking place and the side that played the withdraw chit must retreat.


That is a good point. I think I would rather have the defender declare he wishes to withdraw and then roll a die to see if he succeeds, and if he fails, give the attacker a small DRM bump (like Washington's War), and skip all of the rest of the RPS.


Thanks Judd. I will use that in my next game!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Limerick! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
sagitar wrote:
But if a unit advances on another, is no combat realistic?

Wich one is more fun germantown or pensacola?
Is pensacola like savannah, a siege game?


Germantown is more fun but Pensacola is a solid game. Much better than the more static Savannah.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.