Christian Heckmann
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Frankly speaking, I don't get it. You may talk about strategies and who should play which card, but you may not show your cards to the other players? I mean, after two or three rounds everyone should know everyone elses cards, the abilities and even the priority-levels aren't that hard to memorize, so I find this rule rather irritating. Or is there a good reason for it that I'm not seeing right now?
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Dave Graffam
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I think the intention is to prevent the most experienced player from dictating which actions should be taken by the other players. It makes sure that each player's individual decision-making ability is tested.
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Christian Heckmann
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Hm, that's quite legitimate, although I think that if someone is vastly more experienced in this game then everyone else, it is questionable if he needs to see the other players' action cards to tell them what to do, but recall their feats simply from memory. Judging by my gut feeling I think this rule kind of hurts the strategic component of beginners' rounds and doesn't have that much of an impact on more experienced groups. But I might be wrong.
 
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T France
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It may also be simply to facilitate more communication/strategy planning around the table. I found the similar rule in Lord of the Rings to be helpful for that...
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Tristan Hall
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Titeman wrote:
It may also be simply to facilitate more communication


I think it's this - makes the game more sociable! cool
 
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Travis Cooper
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DagobahDave wrote:
I think the intention is to prevent the most experienced player from dictating which actions should be taken by the other players. It makes sure that each player's individual decision-making ability is tested.


I see it as quite the opposite. If you play hidden, especially with newer players, then the experienced player is the only one that knows all the cards. That will motivate them to talk more. The others don't know how the teams can work together yet, so they won't be able to offer up too much in the way of suggestions yet.

As to the OP. I don't get the point of the rule either, we've always played open hands and it hasn't ever been a problem. We still communicate, talk about what we want to do, then make a decision. With a closed hand, and a group that knows all the cards, I don't see a difference. Yeah, somebody could say they are going to attack, and then not, but really, why would they do that? Why would the outright sabotage the team?

I'm not saying everybody should play open hands, but if you don't like playing with a hidden hand, it works just fine having everything out in the open.
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John "Omega" Williams
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The rule in a way cancells itself out as I do not see any mention of you not being allowed to talk about your cards.

This is a co-op game with a high level of comm-tech at the characters disposal. Someone trying to play it like Battlestar Galactica and sabotage games won't likely be playing long as even small hinderances can potentially catastrophically end a session.

The rule certainly doesnt stop a savvy player from dominating, nore engender table talk more than it would otherwise.

It reads like a remnant of a rule that was later changed.
 
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Michael Mesich
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Omega2064 wrote:
It reads like a remnant of a rule that was later changed.


I agree with that.

Especially after I noticed some people playing their cards open on the table and using their combat team marker to denote which card is activated this round! Suddenly there's less mucking around with the cards (thus probably elongating their lifespan) and there's finally a little more justification for having a nice cardboard team token other than random selection at the start of the game.

The tokens are large enough that it really helps focus on the two remaining cards to choose from and you just lift the token and place it on the next action card.

Brilliant!
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Dan Sulin
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I think the communication argument is best. But the other thought might be that its a residual rule from an early play test where the game played a bit differently. Or possible a rule in place that they want people use to for a possible expansion. Maybe something with a traitor mechanic or some such.
 
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Larry Welborn
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mmesich wrote:
Omega2064 wrote:
It reads like a remnant of a rule that was later changed.


I agree with that.

Especially after I noticed some people playing their cards open on the table and using their combat team marker to denote which card is activated this round! Suddenly there's less mucking around with the cards (thus probably elongating their lifespan) and there's finally a little more justification for having a nice cardboard team token other than random selection at the start of the game.

The tokens are large enough that it really helps focus on the two remaining cards to choose from and you just lift the token and place it on the next action card.

Brilliant!


I like this idea.
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Arthur Rutyna
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Orgon wrote:
I think it depends how "real" you want the game to feel.

In a "real world" situation (err... still a game right!) you don't always know what your team mates are going to do. You may think that you are being supported whilst the other guy is in fact "lacing his shoes" or not behind you.

If you think about "Alien" the movie, you don't have much time to think about what you should do and co-ordinate your team actions. So in a way keeping the card hidden make the game closer to what would happen.

Now for sure it makes it harder to play. So I guess it is a question of choice.

~O


I agree. The way I understand it is that it's easy to communicate and agree upon the Attack, Support, and Move+Activate actions with your team. However, in a real world situation (i.e. movies), when you got a swarm rushing you, you will not have time to discuss Initiative (who does what first), and special powers. The Example in the rule book seems to support this.

I guess it depends on how thematic and difficult you want the game to be.
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p55carroll
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Larry Welborn wrote:
mmesich wrote:
Omega2064 wrote:
It reads like a remnant of a rule that was later changed.


I agree with that.

Especially after I noticed some people playing their cards open on the table and using their combat team marker to denote which card is activated this round! Suddenly there's less mucking around with the cards (thus probably elongating their lifespan) and there's finally a little more justification for having a nice cardboard team token other than random selection at the start of the game.

The tokens are large enough that it really helps focus on the two remaining cards to choose from and you just lift the token and place it on the next action card.

Brilliant!


I like this idea.

I do too. First saw it in a BGG video review before I played the game. It's the natural thing to do when playing so, as I do.
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Arthur Rutyna
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Patrick Carroll wrote:
Larry Welborn wrote:
mmesich wrote:
Omega2064 wrote:
It reads like a remnant of a rule that was later changed.


I agree with that.

Especially after I noticed some people playing their cards open on the table and using their combat team marker to denote which card is activated this round! Suddenly there's less mucking around with the cards (thus probably elongating their lifespan) and there's finally a little more justification for having a nice cardboard team token other than random selection at the start of the game.

The tokens are large enough that it really helps focus on the two remaining cards to choose from and you just lift the token and place it on the next action card.

Brilliant!


I like this idea.

I do too. First saw it in a BGG video review before I played the game. It's the natural thing to do when playing so, as I do.


That is a pretty good idea! I'll have to start playing that way myself. Thanks for the tip!
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I really don't understand why so many people find reasons to not like playing with a hidden hand yet be able to chat about what's in that hand. That way there are better chances of possible miscommunication, especially if the group is playing with the "Once you play it, no takeback" rule.
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