Recommend
24 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Founding Fathers» Forums » Reviews

Subject: This Game Makes Me Want To Frame My Own Constitution rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Brian Mc Cabe
United States
Arizona
flag msg tools
There are those who look at things the way they are and ask why . . . I dream of things that never were and ask why not
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
In Founding Fathers, you are tasked with establishing a new form of government, by manipulating your delegates to do your bidding.

This isn't a heavy game, so the review will be fairly short and concise, and I might be able to refrain from my usual habit of giving a rules summary.

The Bits

The cardboard tokens used in the game are well made, sturdy and the printing is crystal clear, each piece being easily identifiable as to what its function is.

The delegate tokens are nicely-manufactured wooden blocks, with no defects and a smoothly-painted surface. I believe the stickers (an image of the character you are protraying) are on a separate sheet and must be applied by the user, but the graphic images on these are also of the highest quality.

The cards are very nice, as well. I've only played with another's copy, but the graphics, both face and back, are beautifully done and all text is easy to read, even for someone's whose eyes are about shot, always a plus.

The board is very well designed. It isn't ornately gorgeous, but each section is clearly defined as to its function and the color scheme is easy on the eyes.

Game Play

At the beginning of the game, each player is dealt four delegate cards, in addition to his personal character card, from which he keeps two of the four dealt.

These delegates can then be used in a variety of ways to influence Congress. They can be used to vote for or against a bill, debate a bill or their special ability can be implemented, gaining the phasing player some advantage.

There are no wasted actions in Founding Fathers. There are many ways to gain victory points and, thus, many paths to victory. Even if your faction fails to win the vote on the pending bill, your delegates are sent to committee, where, if you have a majority of delegate tokens at the end of the round, you gain a like number of victory points. Your delegates then return to your supply, the delegates of other players remaining in committee in hopes of gaining majority control in the future.

Victory points can be gained throughout the game: during the round through delegate actions, at the end of the round when the outcome of the bill has been determined and at the end of the game, when scoring bonus points for the acquistion of the most delegate tokens.

The end-game scoring is what can really make the difference and ensures that there is no run-away leader problem. A player can have a subtle strategy that will help him come back in the last round.

Because of the special abilities of the delegates and players vying for control of the various action spaces on the board, there is a tremendous amount of player-interaction in this game and your best laid plans can be thwarted by others, another plus in my book.

Personal Favorite Aspect

The designers included on each delegate card a short paragraph describing that man's role in the forming of The Constitution. Beneath that is his special ability, with an appropriate heading, that ties in wonderfully with what his role was at the time.

My ideal game of Founding Fathers would be one in which the bill would be read as it is presented at the beginning of the round so that there would be some context behind what we were doing, instead of just laying the cards out. In my perfect scenario, we would also read the personality traits of the delegates when implementing their special action and then read the text explaining the action.

This might get old after a while, but no more than the game gets to the table, I wouldn't get tired of it. If I owned the game, the first thing I would do is read over everything, to get a real feel for the history.

I've only played twice, but it became one of my favorite games after the first play and is at the top of my "Hot" list, as one I would like to play more often.

I can't recommend this game highly enough.

Brian







15 
 Thumb up
0.30
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Geoff Burkman
United States
Kettering
Ohio
flag msg tools
badge
Peekaboo!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for the nice, concise summary, and for putting this one on my radar!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian Mc Cabe
United States
Arizona
flag msg tools
There are those who look at things the way they are and ask why . . . I dream of things that never were and ask why not
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
After the high praise I always give this game, I hope everyone else enjoys it as much as I do.

Brian
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Drejza
United States
Hockessin
Delaware
flag msg tools
mbmb
Whenever I lay out my delegates for whatever I do, I call them out by name with some type of appropriate accent (Southern, etc.) depending who they are or where they are from. "The honorable Mr. George Read from Delaware casts a YAY vote for the Article!" How else are we going to learn these names??? Shamefully, we didn't get this in school! I love playing this with my kids for that reason...they actually learn some lesser known American history!
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.