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Fu Manchu's Hidden Hoard» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Hidden gem? rss

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Ally Steven Severi
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I love Auntie Mayble very much.
I can say anything to her,
because she removed me out of her will.

When I was refilling her liquor cabinet, 

she pulled Fu Manchu’s Hidden Horde mystery game
from underneath a mountain of empty gin bottles.


Image by Bryan Arroyo

Wanna play? She asked.

FU MANCHU'S HIDDEN HORDE was manufactured in 1967 by the Ideal Toy company, 

in their Famous Mystery Classic Series of game boards 
which included three other games, 

The Case of the Elusive Assassin, Murder on the Orient Express, and Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None.

Is it a hidden gem?
Well… Read on!

FU MANCHU'S HIDDEN HORDE

Just in case if you’re wondering…
Dr. Fu Manchu is a fictional criminal mastermind. 

This villain appeared in cinema & pulp illustrations during the beginning of the 20th century.

Usually portrayed in mandarin outfit and, just like auntie Mayble, with a long moustache.

In Fu Manchu's Hidden Horde the players are treasure hunters 
attempting
to find where the arch criminal has hidden his treasure.

The treasure is hidden in a random location;
Which is determined by the players as they play.


Image by The root of all evil... but you can call me cookie.

Nice retro artwork on the box and in the inside,
if you like that kind of stuff.


The game uses a board and cards.
There are two sections of the board; 

a track around the outside and a map area on the inside. 



Each player has two pawns, one of which is placed on each section of the game board. 




Image by Chris D'Andrea

The players take turns rolling the die and advancing around the outer track.

When they land on one of the clue spaces they can determine 
information about where the treasure is hidden.


Image by Chris D'Andrea

There are five types of clue;
the Start Clue, the First Landmark, the Second Landmark, the Direction and the Final Clue. 

There are eight cards for each of the clues but only one of them is valid.
The players determine which cards are valid
by asking questions and rolling the die.

For example, the Start Clue can be written on blue or on white paper, 

it can be written in red or in black ink
and it can be in one piece or two pieces.
There are eight possible combinations of these three pairs and
there is one start clue card for each.

The player may ask a question like
"Is the Start Clue written in black ink?"
They then roll the die.

If the result is an odd number the answer is "No"
and they know the Start Clue is written in red. 

If it is even the answer is "Yes" and the Start Clue is in black. 

Either way, they can eliminate half the Start Clue cards.


After three questions they can determine which Start Clue is the valid one.
The same thing is done for each of the other four clues.


Image by The root of all evil... but you can call me cookie.

When a player thinks they know where the treasure is hidden,
they move their piece on the inside of the board until it is standing on the square the treasure is in.
They then announce they have found the treasure. 


That player stops playing but the others continue until
they think they have found the treasure's location. 

The first player to arrive at the correct location is the winner.

Ha! I win you old bat!

I tried to convince Auntie Mable that I developed Tourette syndrome. 

Too bad for me, she is not senile.

Is the game any good?
This game is enjoyable.
Not super, not terrible.

The game creates suspense towards the end of the game, 

when everybody is closing in on the victory spot.

What makes this game interesting is that the mystery is created 

by the players as the game is played. 


In my humble opinion, that is pretty neat.

Auntie Mayble does not like this game. 

She just wanted to dazzle my eyes with it and she succeeded.


According to her: Ideal’s The Case of the Elusive Assassin is far more superior.

So I asked auntie Mayble very carefully.

Since it’s a very old and ugly game
and you don't like it...
Can I have it?

She smiled and gave me an answer I deserved.

NO!

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Danny Webb
United States
Whitesburg
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Great review. I've been wanting this game forever and have pretty much given up hope of ever finding a copy.
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Nice review. I'd love to meet your grandma
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Ally Steven Severi
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This game is pretty rare.
I'm lucky auntie has it.

Don't give up hope.
You never know
 
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Ally Steven Severi
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For comical effect,
I exaggerated the quirky personality of my real auntie.
She is a nice old lady.
Thanks to her I’m into board games.
 
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richard goldbaum
United States
natick
Massachusetts
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If you are still looking, I have a copy in very good condition. please make an offer : richgoldbaum@yahoo.com
 
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Jeff Shoot
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tolendante wrote:
Great review. I've been wanting this game forever and have pretty much given up hope of ever finding a copy.


I know this is much much later, but did you ever find a copy? If my memory serves me (dangerous statement by me, if you ask my wife... )this is the one from this series that I may have had two copies of... albeit in a little rough condition! Let me know and I'll check...
 
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