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Subject: The largest planet in the solar system about to be found(maybe) rss

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I'm not sure if this has been discussed yet. But the possibility that another gas giant might be lingering in the Oort cloud.
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Cattlemark
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Re: The largest planet in the solar system about to be found
I thought the Daily Mail was basically an English tabloid?
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David
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Re: The largest planet in the solar system about to be found
Jusat another NASA coverup. I like one of the posts relating to the article refered to. "How come they can find planets in far away galaxies yet they only now think they can find planets larger than Jupiter in our solar system!"

Same scammers who tell us they went to the moon decades ago on a 286 computer, and haven't been back.....gimme a break.

When will people wake up out of the trance.

Thanks for the post...interesting.
 
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Marshall P.
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Re: The largest planet in the solar system about to be found
No, there’s no proof of a giant planet in the outer solar system
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Gunther Schmidl
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mdp4828 wrote:


I wonder how long until that poor guy snaps and goes on a killing spree.
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gschmidl wrote:
mdp4828 wrote:


I wonder how long until that poor guy snaps and goes on a killing spree.

He's been running some version of Bad Astronomy for over a decade now. If he survived Armageddon, he'll survive this.
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Matthew Eklund
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I seem to recall an old Nemesis theory of a dark gas giant slinging comets our way from beyond pluto.

As to the difficulty in finding objects in the Oort cloud versus finding them around distant stars; as i understand it, we only find planets around distant stars when they, quite serendipitously, pass directly in front of the star...

This strategy obviously doesn't work when looking for things orbiting further from our own star than we are.
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Matthew_Eklund wrote:
I seem to recall an old Nemesis theory of a dark gas giant slinging comets our way from beyond pluto.

As to the difficulty in finding objects in the Oort cloud versus finding them around distant stars; as i understand it, we only find planets around distant stars when they, quite serendipitously, pass directly in front of the star...

This strategy obviously doesn't work when looking for things orbiting further from our own star than we are.


Transit observations are still relatively rare, I think. Mostly, we detect them through spectroscopy, looking for orbital wobble as a sun orbits around its planet.

The real problem is selection bias. Most of what astronomers find are very large planets very close to their stars. These are simply an easier astronomical problem to solve than very distant planets in dark parts of the solar system crowded with other debris.
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Darrell Hanning
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darksurtur wrote:
Matthew_Eklund wrote:
I seem to recall an old Nemesis theory of a dark gas giant slinging comets our way from beyond pluto.

As to the difficulty in finding objects in the Oort cloud versus finding them around distant stars; as i understand it, we only find planets around distant stars when they, quite serendipitously, pass directly in front of the star...

This strategy obviously doesn't work when looking for things orbiting further from our own star than we are.


Transit observations are still relatively rare, I think. Mostly, we detect them through spectroscopy, looking for orbital wobble as a sun orbits around its planet.

The real problem is selection bias. Most of what astronomers find are very large planets very close to their stars. These are simply an easier astronomical problem to solve than very distant planets in dark parts of the solar system crowded with other debris.


You of course mean stellar wobble, as a planet closely orbits its star...
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darksurtur
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DarrellKH wrote:

You of course mean stellar wobble, as a planet closely orbits its star...


Well, I wrote that quickly and knew what I meant, but didn't get it down in text clearly.

I was trying to convey that astronomers look at the variations in the movement of the star caused by the gravitational pull of its planet (what I meant by "as the star orbits around its planet"). They actually orbit around their mutual center of gravity, but my wording was particularly silly since I am sure that point is within or near the stellar radius.

Whether that is stellar or orbital wobble seems like a question of semantics.
 
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