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Subject: 10.3 Determining PC Isolation Segment rss

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Michael Batts
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Learning the game with a friend of mine and we are playing through the Example of Play in the Playbook. But we are both having a problem understanding what constitues an American/British isolated PC.

The rule states, "A. An American/British PC marker is NOT isolated if it can trace a path through adjacent American/British controlled spaces to:" and it lists the requirements.

However, when we look at the example on Page 19 - Example 1, it illustrates British PC's in Springfield, Boston(Port), and New Haven (Port) and American PC's in B-Lexington/Concord and A-Hartford.
The example states that the American PC's are not isolated because they can trace a path to C-Newport (Port).

But how are PC's A & B NOT isolated? They are NOT tracing a path through ADJACENT American controlled spaces. A and B are tracing a path INTO C, but they are not doing the tracing THROUGH any adjacent controlled space to C, unless B traces "a path through adjacent American controlled spaces" through A into C; or A through B into C.
Of course neither one is possible since there are no connecting lines between A and B.

What's creating the confusion for us is the phrase, "...a path THROUGH ADJACENT American (0r British) controlled spaces to" In the illustrated examples there are no adjacent controlled spaces that a path can be traced THROUGH (from A to C nor from B to C) to an uncontrolled space.

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Greg Schmittgens
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The bottom line is there is no requirement to go through an adjacent space if you can trace a path to the right type of space. If the PC marker is already adjacent to an acceptable space, it is not isolated.

Does that help?
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Michael Batts
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Greg, thank you.

But as we see it, the rule in 10.31 A is an 'IF' statement requirement that must be met first. We assume that if the 'IF' rule cannot be met then a PC marker is isolated.
The bulleted sections then list the conditions whereby PC markers do not become isolated.

Again, "An American PC marker is NOT isolated if it can trace a path through adjacent American controlled spaces to...

a. an uncontrolled space that does not contain a British CU, or, etc.

In other words, as we understand it, a PC marker must, to prevent isolation, has to trace a path THROUGH ADJACENT American controlled spaces first, AND THEN meet at least one of the four bulletted conditions.



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Aaron Cappocchi
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You are right that the rule is confusnigly (perhaps flat-out wrongly) worded. But Greg is right - you can trace directly to the empty space (or other condition-meeting space) without HAVING to go through additional PC markers first.

Imagine 2 spaces completely surrounded by British PC's. One space is empty and one has an American PC. The American PC does not have to have an additional American PC to trace though. It can trace directly to the empty space.
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Mark Herman
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Michael Batts wrote:
Learning the game with a friend of mine and we are playing through the Example of Play in the Playbook. But we are both having a problem understanding what constitues an American/British isolated PC.

The rule states, "A. An American/British PC marker is NOT isolated if it can trace a path through adjacent American/British controlled spaces to:" and it lists the requirements.

However, when we look at the example on Page 19 - Example 1, it illustrates British PC's in Springfield, Boston(Port), and New Haven (Port) and American PC's in B-Lexington/Concord and A-Hartford.
The example states that the American PC's are not isolated because they can trace a path to C-Newport (Port).

But how are PC's A & B NOT isolated? They are NOT tracing a path through ADJACENT American controlled spaces. A and B are tracing a path INTO C, but they are not doing the tracing THROUGH any adjacent controlled space to C, unless B traces "a path through adjacent American controlled spaces" through A into C; or A through B into C.
Of course neither one is possible since there are no connecting lines between A and B.

What's creating the confusion for us is the phrase, "...a path THROUGH ADJACENT American (0r British) controlled spaces to" In the illustrated examples there are no adjacent controlled spaces that a path can be traced THROUGH (from A to C nor from B to C) to an uncontrolled space.



I see your point, but Greg has answered the question. You are not required to trace through an adjacent controlled space if you are already adjacent to one. In any case the example in the rules is correct.

Mark
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Michael Batts
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Cool! The designer himself answers. This is something to a newcomer to the hobby!

The wording is confusing, but we understand that as long as PC markers are either adjacent to an uncontrolled space, or can trace a path, per the rules, to an uncontrolled space, a PC marker is not isolated.

Thanks to all for clearing up the matter for us.
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