Michael Schroeder
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So I'm working on a game that is mostly card driven...but it could easily be changed to tiles...the resources and such....


The game would also include some cubes and if is mostly card driven, Im wondering, should I include a less amount of cardboard, or individual player boards?

I would seek to have my game published, so I'm wondering if I'd have more more luck getting my game published if they see there's less components, especially cardboard? Instead of cards?

So I'm asking here,should I take such things into consideration when making my game...I'm still in design phase, so this defn has an effect on what I can do.

Think of it this way...in race for the galaxy, you have a tableau, what if I wanted to make a game where you have a tabluea or personal card area, that must be put on the board...but the board really serves no functional purpose..,it's jut there for effect.

Thanks.
 
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Sweetgotham
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There is no hard and fast rule but by being mindful of the production costs shows that you have an understanding of some of the concerns of the publishers. There are plenty of great games with all sorts of cardboard and bits (Dungeon Lords comes to mind) but they should be meaningful to gameplay. Having said that, player boards, IMO are great and really can provider a lot of useful info to the player (and thematic mood) vs a lot of surreptitiousness bits.
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Lizbeth
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my suspicion is yes, though obviously the type of game has an effect on it (fillers need less, ameri trash can go nuts etc.)

Off course, if you pitch to fantasy flight, presumably they'll frown on anything without dials, cards, mini card, chits, counters, plastic figures and dice

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Jeremiah Lee
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Generally, yes. You want to make the proposed game as 'lean' as possible. More money spent on the game's bits makes the game harder to take on as a risk.

Publishers can always add on things if they think it's worth it, and they'll often take away things as well, but if it's already trimmed down to the essentials, they'll see the effort was put in.
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Sweetgotham
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Jeremiah_Lee wrote:
Generally, yes. You want to make the proposed game as 'lean' as possible. More money spent on the game's bits makes the game harder to take on as a risk.

Publishers can always add on things if they think it's worth it, and they'll often take away things as well, but if it's already trimmed down to the essentials, they'll see the effort was put in.


I would add the by forcing yourself to self-edit you might realize and come across some pretty ingenious new ways to track/ mark/ direct action etc that would have otherwise just been ‘easier’ to have done with a bit. Instead of possibly viewing trimming bits to their minimum as a restriction, look at it as way to incubate creativity.
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Mike Kollross
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You need to be aware of costs when pitching the game and be prepared to offer alternatives. If your game has dozens of individualy unique dice its unlikely to get published.

Full sized cards are ~ $0.01

Half sized cards are (you guessed it) ~ $0.005

Card board is about $0.34 for a 11 x 11 sheet. If you can get 100 tokens off that sheet than each token is ~ $0.0034

Tokens are cheaper than even half sized cards. This is the one thing I found the most surprising.

A bi-fold board is ~ $1.85, which is a huge part of the final cost.

The mold to make dice are ~ $4500. Huge cost but if you can spread it over the cost of enough games its manageable.

Be prepared to address concerns over cost

"These could easily be half sized"
"The board could be split up"
"cubes could be tokens"

If you feel the game NEEDS wooden cubes than be prepared to defend the argument cardboard is more cost effective.
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Sweetgotham
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MK-Ultra71 wrote:

If you feel the game NEEDS wooden cubes than be prepared to defend the argument cardboard is more cost effective.


I say go with the cardboard no matter what!


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Mark Salzwedel
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As others have said, you probably want to start with components that you think are right for you and people you've tested it with. For example, if you've used a card deck and a spinner would be faster, that's a consideration. If you could use standard or custom dice, of course the standard dice will be cheaper because those can be purchased pre-made and won't need a new mold. If you are publishing in the USA, fewer small bits and nicer graphics and player aids are in style. German publishers, however, like lots of little bits, and prefer wood to plastic.

If you are pitching to a publisher, the most important consideration is ease of use. If you are presenting in person, you want to be able to demo fast. If you are mailing it, you need to make sure that the setup is fast and the rules of play painfully clear.
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Michael Schroeder
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Thanks for all the tips, especially the costs.

You mention tokens...would these be circlular shaped cardboard chits that are on a sheet?

Actually graphical tokens would be better for me, instead of cubes. But when we say tokens...is that chits of any size, not just circular...on a sheet?

If I could use cardboard chis, similar to tiles in agricola...instead of cards...that would be cheaper to the publisher? Also, if I could use tiles as I just mentioned on a board, instead of cards, I could conserve space on the player board.
 
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monchi
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I think at the end of the day it all comes down to what fits the game the best. Publishers aren't scared of lots of bits, just look at the wide range of different types of games on the market. I think most of the time the more bits the game has the more you can charge. At the end of the day it comes down to if the bits add to the over all experience.

I don't think you should ever build your game based on what you think publishers are concerned with as you will never really know what they are concerned with. Your focus should always be on producing the best version of your game be it card based or board based. A good game is a good game. All publishers are really concerned with is if your game can sell 2-5000 copies. Who cares if your game only costs $3 to make if you can only sell 250 games. If your game costs $15 to make but you can sell 5000 games no publisher will be complaining. Do the math people, what would you rather make 40% on $3 or on $15?

All you need to do is look at the top 100 games on BBG. There are more games with lots of bits in the top 100 than "simple" or "stripped down" games. It is all about the value people can associate with the game. Most people will pay $50 for a game if it comes with lots of tiles, tokens, meeples and other stuff.

Just make your game the game it is.
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