Recommend
9 
 Thumb up
 Hide
33 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Customizable Games» Forums » General

Subject: Does anybody like buying blind purchase collectibles? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Richard Gagnon
msg tools
I can't say that I like buying anything without knowing what I get. The degree to which I tolerate the format of blind purchases is indirectly proportional to the per item cost of what I'm purchasing. The higher the price, the more unsatisified I am with an unneeded duplicate. Paying $10 for a single blind purchase Monsterpocalyse monster booster, that only contains the one monster and its alternate form figure, is extremely annoying when I get a duplicate. Getting one duplicate Magic card, in a pack of 15 for $3, isn't as frustrating. Of course the usefulness of having a duplicate in a game is also a strong factor. Monsterpocalyse rules don't allow one player having two of the same monster, so a second copy of one is useless. Magic allows four of nearly any card in a deck, so a copy of a good card can not only be useful, but necessary (though 5 or more copies are less useful unless one builds multiple decks).

One of the interesting side benefits of collectible games with forced rarities is that it creates inexpensive commons on the secondary market. As long as the game is designed so that it is still fun to play with commons, it's fairly cheap to get into the game this way. It's not the road to be taken for tournament play, but tournament players are always going to be a subset of the total playing market for a game. This is a particularly great benefit for miniatures players who can buy painted miniatures as low as 15 cents each through some stores for common figures. The nice thing for miniatures players is that the miniatures don't have to be played with the game they're coming from. As long as they maintain a scale that the player is using, they're good for other games. Heroscape players are more than happy to use Mage Knight and HeroClix figures to supplement what's available for the game. Collectible cards games aren't as versatile because the individual card backs and game mechanics cannot be mixed together with different games.

The blind purchase format benefits retailers because of the smaller amount of shelf space that has to be dedicated to the game. Nonrandom packaging requires more shelf space to show all the packages. Not all the nonrandom packs will sell with the same frequency, so stores can wind up with some nonrandom packs selling better than others, leaving them with packs that they can't get rid of. With blind packaging, they only have to worry about whether or not the game sells, not whether the individual pieces of the games are equally marketable. Blind packaging, in this instance, gives gamers a better variety of components. Lower powered pieces wouldn't be marketable as long as higher powered, multipurpose components are available. HeroClix couldn't put out as many different superheroes in a fixed format. There are only so many heroes, without powers, that players would want to buy. Batman and Captain America might find a home in player collections, but lesser known characters would probably never be sculpted outside of the blind format.

Blind format games die real good. I'm not entirely sure why--other than that they may be marketed in more stores than typical games. That would give them higher print runs such that, when they fail, there are more excessive copies left over than for typical boardgames. While this doesn't benefit the overall game market, it's a great boon for gamers that want to buy into them when they start being heavily discounted. A person can buy a box of 12 Austin Powers starter decks or a box of 30 booster packs for the price of one booster pack of Magic cards ($3 at MiniatureMarket).

I'd imagine that some people enjoy cracking open a blind purchase with hopes and expectations of getting something they really want.

I always look at the format with mixed emotions because I hate the disappointment of not getting what I was hoping I was buying. I appreciate that the format has provided a lot of goodies to gamers.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bernd Caspers
Germany
Mönchengladbach
Unspecified
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have only experience with WotC games, but the first booster case ( the only way to go for me) was always a joy, since you got no doubles of rares/very rares and you could pull out a Boba Fett for 2 Euros or something that goes for 30 on Ebay.
I only bought 2 booster cases once for Rebel Storm and ended up with 3-4 doubles which was still o.k.
Normally I buy only singles from there and avoid the one that go over 10 Euros (with a few exceptions).

There is a certain aspect of joy to blind purchase that you can't find in a normal purchase.
It's like rolling a die vs playing a card, with the card you know what you get, but if roll a die and get a six...unmatched, the thrill alone is even worth the risk of rolling a one.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
fightcitymayor
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
"This is a really weird game, and you’ll find that most people will not want to play this."
Avatar
mb
Buying any "collectible" game scratches a few itches for me:

1) I like to play games. Fun games. Tossing away how they are packaged/marketed, I think CCGs & CMGs are simply fun to play. Magic is totally fun.

2) The collector itch gets satisfied. If I like something, I'd like a whole set of something even more. And CCGs/CMGs give you that opportunity. "Here are the pieces, now go get 'em however you want." Maybe some like to go crazy paying retail for booster packs on release day, maybe others don't pick up on it until the stuff has hit rock-bottom clearance. But there's a strategy for every collector.

3) There is effort involved. This isn't just buy Monopoly then go home & play. You have to make the effort to learn what set is what, what pieces do best/worst, where to get the best deal. It becomes a 360-degree immersive experience just to play. Not just an off-the-shelf & play thing. It emphasizes the "hobby" aspect, and I like that.

4) I kinda like to gamble. Not particularly nickel-slot type gambling, but anything where there is unknown risk/reward. I like opening the pack of Magic cards reeeeeeeal slow, and leafing through them one at a time, just letting the Rare/Mythic Rare icon peek through. That's when the adrenaline & serotonin kick in and I glimpse the name to see how good a card it is. That gets me off. Not in a sexual way.

5) And this one may not apply to everyone, and maybe not even the majority of players, but I like the idea that picking up CCGs/CMGs for cheap always gives you the option to sell them again on eBay and maybe make a profit, or your money back, or at least get enough cash back to justify the money spent as covering the fun that was had. Selling the last thing I bought is always in the back of my mind (this may not typify the majority.)

6) CCGs/CMG's (although usually dying at great rates) give you the promise of a "game that never ends." Sometimes board games seem limiting. After the 3rd time I played St. Petersburg, I kinda thought the game was playing itself. Magic never plays itself. Magic is always different, and can be even more different the more effort you put in to expanding it. Even a game like Mage Knight, dead for years, had so many pieces and so many sets that exploring them all would pretty much equate to a game without end. I like the idea of an immortal game.





5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob Roberts

Unspecified
msg tools
Avatar
Lots of people must, given the success of Magic and all the copy-cats that followed. For myself, no. Zero interest in blind purchase.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jacovis
United States
Las Vegas
Nevada
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
badinfo wrote:
Lots of people must, given the success of Magic and all the copy-cats that followed. For myself, no. Zero interest in blind purchase.


All it does is allow people a temporary sense of achievement and power in Magic because they can actually be something in a game world whereas they have failed miserably in the real one.



All joking aside, there are great games out there that I would play if they were not collectible, because quite frankly, I'd rather guy great boardgames for $50 or even $100 that I will use repeatedly over and over for years instead of shelling out five times that within a year just to maybe get some of the game. That being the limited factor of what I get to spend on games in a great year. Not only that, considering that not all of us have as much disposable income (I definitely haven't been able to spend $500 a year on games in quite a while), getting something that is not going to be "outdated" in tournament play. Also, buying 50 booster packs of a game just because my army needs this one monster, or that one treasure pack, or whatever, then having to do it over again several times a year because the new sets are outdated, etc.

I think that especially given the economic times, collectible is not the way to go. Magic and such will survive because they're beasts, but more and more I think you're going to find people investing in the many great games and their definable expansion packs that do NOT get outdated in 3 months because of a new set.

I used to enjoy the blind purchase, but as I've gotten older and the times have gotten tougher, I don't want anything to do with spending as much money as people tend to on cards or minis or whatever that become obsolete. I spent less for Commands and Colors: Ancients and all of its expansions than I did in one quarter for a single one of my ccg days, and it hasn't become obsolete, it has many many expansions and replayability for me and the people I play with, and we don't all have to buy all the stuff, because I own it we can all play it.

A good example of a game like this is Wizard Kings from Columbia Games. It used to be a regular game, with fixed expansions. Worked fine. CG decided to get in on the collectible fad and made it so that you now have to buy the base game, then to get anything for your armies, AND the treasures to expand the scenarios you have to buy randomly packed boosters. I enjoyed the game, but why would I do that to myself when there are so many other games that include their entire expansions with everything I need in them to play, for much much less overall cost, PLUS I'm not sitting on tons of pieces I don't need or have to find a home for.

In case I haven't been clear: I extremely dislike blind purchases now, and will actually walk away from something with them because there are so many great games coming out that don't require me to do that, and that I can still play years from now.

If you made a game that had blind expansions as completely optional instead of including necessary materials in the expansions, it might be something worth considering, though I personally hope the whole fad dies out a quick and painless death and is replaced by something else. Except Magic, so long as people keep buying that game, all the FLGS's and such can stay in business so I can buy my boardgames there, when I want to

Just my 2 !

Cheers, and best regards!

Jacovis
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J.L. Robert
United States
Sherman Oaks
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Follow me for wargames!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There must not be a lot of crossover baseball card collectors/gamers.

I've been enjoying packs of random cards since I was 6.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob Roberts

Unspecified
msg tools
Avatar
Jacovis wrote:
A good example of a game like this is Wizard Kings from Columbia Games. It used to be a regular game, with fixed expansions. Worked fine. CG decided to get in on the collectible fad and made it so that you now have to buy the base game, then to get anything for your armies, AND the treasures to expand the scenarios you have to buy randomly packed boosters. I enjoyed the game, but why would I do that to myself when there are so many other games that include their entire expansions with everything I need in them to play, for much much less overall cost, PLUS I'm not sitting on tons of pieces I don't need or have to find a home for.


Which is why I didn't buy Wizard Kings. I was interested until I found out they tried to make it a "collectible" game. I have a rather ridiculous amount of Heroscape on the other hand...
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bwian, just
United States
Longmont
Colorado
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I don't like blind purchase, but I'm willing to put up with it for:
1) Prepainted miniatures
2) Diverse game space

I don't feel the need to own everything, so that definitely helps. If I have enough to make for a fun game, that's good enough for me. For Magic, that means that I've collated my cards into their original boosters and tournament packs: I can make many combinations of Sealed decks, by mixing and matching. For Mythos, I've just picked up enough cards to build ten decks at a time .
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
RJD
United States
Quad-Cities
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Bwian wrote:
I don't like blind purchase, but I'm willing to put up with it for:
1) Prepainted miniatures


That's my main draw too. I gave up on collectible card games years ago, but I've never lost my interest in collectible prepainted minis games, and I've played so many. I'd still be collecting Star Wars Miniatures even now if Wizards hadn't dropped the SW license last year.

While I don't enjoy the "mystery" of opening up collectible boosters or cases as others seem to, I do enjoy the vast variety of characters we can get who might never have seen the light of day if the makers of the game weren't trying to pad out each set with as many different figures as they can. After years of waiting, I finally got Heroclix figures of Power Pack? Awesome! Cade Skywalker and the Imperial Knights from Dark Horse's Legacy comics as Star Wars Miniatures? Cool! Give me even more please!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Richard Gagnon
msg tools
fightcitymayor wrote:
Magic never plays itself. Magic is always different, and can be even more different the more effort you put in to expanding it. Even a game like Mage Knight, dead for years, had so many pieces and so many sets that exploring them all would pretty much equate to a game without end. I like the idea of an immortal game.

That's the appeal of customizable games for me also. They have a lot of variety that can present nearly endless variations of gameplay. Two different players can bring their decks together and almost be playing two different games within the same game rules. The game has enough different game mechanics within it that it can support drastically different types of play. Build different decks and the game becomes fresh again. The path to winning isn't the same as it was for the other deck. Most games, particularly ones like chess, can eventually become rote for much of their play because the pieces don't change and sometimes evening beginning positions are always the same.

There are a fair number of dead collectible games that lasted long enough that, even though they died out, there are so many cards or miniatures available to warrant buying them. Besides Mage Knight, MechWarrior, AD&D, Axis & Allies, and Star Wars had more than a dozen miniatures expansions. Some of the dead CCGs released two dozen expansions, such as Star Trek, VS, and Lord of the Rings--all of which are comparative steals today since boxes of boosters can be bought for under $20 (originally $80). Even the ones that didn't last as long still released enough product that there's still considerable variety available. Hecatomb only had two expansions, but that gave the game close to 400 different cards to play with. It's still a very available game at rock bottom prices. Dreamblade put out a few hundred of the most nightmarishly imaginative miniatures around, but this one is getting harder to find with few bargains available now. Even Mage Knight is getting harder to find and the case bargains I found a couple years ago have disappeared.

Jacovis wrote:
If you made a game that had blind expansions as completely optional instead of including necessary materials in the expansions, it might be something worth considering,

I think any new collectible game has to look at blind expansions as just another means of distribution and not the primary means. The game should come first. Unless the core game is fun, the number of expansions is meaningless. If blind expansions can get the game in stores that don't normally carry that type of game, I'm all for it. I'd also like the publisher to offer the game in fixed formats. That's especially important for miniatures because of the price. With all the internet outlets for buying games, publishers ought to consider that they can market complete sets to collectors that don't want to go the blind buy route. There are a lot of gamers that will not touch the collectible market because they don't want to waste money buying unknown product.

Jacovis wrote:
I think you're going to find people investing in the many great games and their definable expansion packs that do NOT get outdated in 3 months because of a new set.

This has always seemed an odd complaint against collectible games. I've encountered the comment from different posters. On one hand, playing boardgames without ever considering tournament play seems fine, but not being able stay current playing the tournament scene with a collectible game seems wrong. Keep in mind that Magic has a Legacy tournament format that allows playing from all sets. I've zero interest in playing in tournaments, so nothing gets outdated unless I don't want to use something.

The bulk commons left over from CCGs and CMGs will be cheaper in quantity than the equivalent nonrandom versions.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric Jome
United States
Franklin
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mb
rgagnon wrote:
I can't say that I like buying anything without knowing what I get.


Gambling is fun and exciting. Billions of dollars are spent on the fun and excitement of gambling around the world every day. It shouldn't be too hard to understand why.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric Jome
United States
Franklin
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mb
rgagnon wrote:
I always look at the format with mixed emotions because I hate the disappointment of not getting what I was hoping I was buying.


So... um. Don't? Buy individual cards. Trade. Pick up unwanted collections from players who're looking to get out of the game.

There are lots of options beyond buying and opening booster packs or boxes.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrés Santiago Pérez-Bergquist
United States
Mountain View
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
cosine wrote:
Gambling is fun and exciting. Billions of dollars are spent on the fun and excitement of gambling around the world every day. It shouldn't be too hard to understand why.


It's very hard to understand why. I know that large numbers of people gamble, often compulsively, but I completely and utterly fail to see the attraction of it at all. Betting on your skill, such as in poker or even blackjack, I understand, and I can even see betting on the outcomes of sporting events or stock markets where you think you know you have a better model of what will happen, but betting on completely random events with negative expectations for you, like slot machines, roulette, or lottery tickets, appears to me to be utterly and completely you-should-seek-medical-attention-for-this-because-your-brain-is-malfunctioning insane.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
AJ Newhausen
United States
Loves Park
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There's a sense of camaraderie around a roulette or craps table. Everyone knows they're probably gonna lose, but as long as they're sitting/standing around and cracking jokes about it, they don't care. It's not all that unlike a bunch of people sitting around a bar shooting the breeze spending way too much on alcohol that will leave them with nothing but a hangover in the morning...only this hangover's in their wallet.

Plus, I've been guilty (more than once) of sitting down at a roulette table solely because there was a pretty girl at it.

As for the slot machines...you've got me there. I can't find a justification for that one.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bobb Beauchamp
United States
Volo
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I enjoy opening a pack and seeing what comes out. It adds an element of fun.

Granted, that level of fun decreases as you spend more $ and get dupes of something you don't like. If there's an active trading community, you can correct for that some.

At the same time, financial realities being what they are, I can't afford to play the game (Monsterpocalypse) they way I want while buying boosters. I need to trade or but singles to fill out my forces the way I want, and that's annoying.

At the same time, I've spent less on Monpoc and am happy with the factions I can play. I'm just starting to get into Hordes, and the cost of the 35 or 50 pt force I want to field staggers me.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Pennsylvania
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
yes
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ron Laufer
United States
Millington
New Jersey
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
blind purchasing also allows for my favorite form of CCG playing: Draft. I love the skill-testing challenge of it, and the even (OK, randomized, but evenly so) playing field. It would be pretty boring to draft packs with known contents.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Richard Gagnon
msg tools
kingbobb wrote:
I'm just starting to get into Hordes, and the cost of the 35 or 50 pt force I want to field staggers me.

I haven't gotten into Hordes, so I'm not sure if Caesar miniatures are entirely appropriate for the game and its scale. You might want to look into their fantasy line of figures (1/72).
http://www.scalehobbyist.com/catagories/Scale_Figures/browse...
You can pick up 37 plastic elves (only 10 poses) for a little over $7.

I'm surprised that a lot of people are okay with the blind purchase format. That does indicate that new collectible/customizable games shouldn't entirely do away with it. Maybe the greater issue is the degree of forced rarity thrown into it--as well as what kinds of figures/cards are made rare.

Draft can still be done from randomized card dealing, but a lot of players don't mind buying a bunch of packs to do the same thing.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Canada
Bolton
Ontario
flag msg tools
mb
gonzoron wrote:
blind purchasing also allows for my favorite form of CCG playing: Draft. I love the skill-testing challenge of it, and the even (OK, randomized, but evenly so) playing field. It would be pretty boring to draft packs with known contents.


You can easily draft a LCG, just make your own booster packs.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Keefe
United States
Kettering
Ohio
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I don't like spending my hard-earned cash on something unless I know what I'm getting. Nor do I like to pay top dollar for things.

So no. I don't care for the blind purchase and hope you get something good model. Been there, done that. Not doing it again.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
TS S. Fulk
Sweden
Örebro
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
rgagnon wrote:
I can't say that I like buying anything without knowing what I get. The degree to which I tolerate the format of blind purchases is indirectly proportional to the per item cost of what I'm purchasing. The higher the price, the more unsatisified I am with an unneeded duplicate. Paying $10 for a single blind purchase Monsterpocalyse monster booster, that only contains the one monster and its alternate form figure, is extremely annoying when I get a duplicate. Getting one duplicate Magic card, in a pack of 15 for $3, isn't as frustrating. Of course the usefulness of having a duplicate in a game is also a strong factor. Monsterpocalyse rules don't allow one player having two of the same monster, so a second copy of one is useless. Magic allows four of nearly any card in a deck, so a copy of a good card can not only be useful, but necessary (though 5 or more copies are less useful unless one builds multiple decks).

One of the interesting side benefits of collectible games with forced rarities is that it creates inexpensive commons on the secondary market. As long as the game is designed so that it is still fun to play with commons, it's fairly cheap to get into the game this way. It's not the road to be taken for tournament play, but tournament players are always going to be a subset of the total playing market for a game. This is a particularly great benefit for miniatures players who can buy painted miniatures as low as 15 cents each through some stores for common figures. The nice thing for miniatures players is that the miniatures don't have to be played with the game they're coming from. As long as they maintain a scale that the player is using, they're good for other games. Heroscape players are more than happy to use Mage Knight and HeroClix figures to supplement what's available for the game. Collectible cards games aren't as versatile because the individual card backs and game mechanics cannot be mixed together with different games.

The blind purchase format benefits retailers because of the smaller amount of shelf space that has to be dedicated to the game. Nonrandom packaging requires more shelf space to show all the packages. Not all the nonrandom packs will sell with the same frequency, so stores can wind up with some nonrandom packs selling better than others, leaving them with packs that they can't get rid of. With blind packaging, they only have to worry about whether or not the game sells, not whether the individual pieces of the games are equally marketable. Blind packaging, in this instance, gives gamers a better variety of components. Lower powered pieces wouldn't be marketable as long as higher powered, multipurpose components are available. HeroClix couldn't put out as many different superheroes in a fixed format. There are only so many heroes, without powers, that players would want to buy. Batman and Captain America might find a home in player collections, but lesser known characters would probably never be sculpted outside of the blind format.

Blind format games die real good. I'm not entirely sure why--other than that they may be marketed in more stores than typical games. That would give them higher print runs such that, when they fail, there are more excessive copies left over than for typical boardgames. While this doesn't benefit the overall game market, it's a great boon for gamers that want to buy into them when they start being heavily discounted. A person can buy a box of 12 Austin Powers starter decks or a box of 30 booster packs for the price of one booster pack of Magic cards ($3 at MiniatureMarket).

I'd imagine that some people enjoy cracking open a blind purchase with hopes and expectations of getting something they really want.

I always look at the format with mixed emotions because I hate the disappointment of not getting what I was hoping I was buying. I appreciate that the format has provided a lot of goodies to gamers.


There is that "Christmas Day" what did I get sense of joy and disappointment with Collectable Games. But I get same joy out of opening a normal game box for the first (and with a lot less disappointment--usually). What I don't get, is why EVERY collectable game has to have rarity, just because Magic does. Baseball cards never had rarity (maybe they do now, but not when I bought them as a kid). FFG's LCGs have gone this route. There are no rares. You get the same number of every card. I would like to see a CCG or CMG (but these are really economic suicide, as are most miniature games) with no rarity. Then you could buy a complete set for cheaper than the cost of a box of boosters, if you wish to go that route.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
TS S. Fulk
Sweden
Örebro
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
kingbobb wrote:
I enjoy opening a pack and seeing what comes out. It adds an element of fun.

Granted, that level of fun decreases as you spend more $ and get dupes of something you don't like. If there's an active trading community, you can correct for that some.

At the same time, financial realities being what they are, I can't afford to play the game (Monsterpocalypse) they way I want while buying boosters. I need to trade or but singles to fill out my forces the way I want, and that's annoying.

At the same time, I've spent less on Monpoc and am happy with the factions I can play. I'm just starting to get into Hordes, and the cost of the 35 or 50 pt force I want to field staggers me.


Then play a game that doesn't require such an investment or that allows/encourages proxies. I've played many games of BattleTech, in which someone (maybe even me) said, "This Awesome is a Thug for this scenario." Battletech and other games also don't require that one person has the army. They encourage people bringing 1 or 2 figures that they want to play. That way 6-10 people can play at once instead of 2.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bwian, just
United States
Longmont
Colorado
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tssfulk wrote:
What I don't get, is why EVERY collectable game has to have rarity, just because Magic does. Baseball cards never had rarity (maybe they do now, but not when I bought them as a kid). FFG's LCGs have gone this route. There are no rares. You get the same number of every card. I would like to see a CCG or CMG (but these are really economic suicide, as are most miniature games) with no rarity. Then you could buy a complete set for cheaper than the cost of a box of boosters, if you wish to go that route.

I know of at least one CCG that had a flat distribution. Of course, there were other reasons that people shied away from XXXenophile... whistle
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrzej Sieradzki
Poland
Opole
flag msg tools
badge
We don't stop playing when we get old, but we get old when we stop playing.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I love it. I discovered that kind of gaming/collecting recently with SW miniatures on sale and bought many boosters having an extreme luck with rare figures. What a thrill it was to open a box! Now, when I play more figure-oriented games I found another game of that kind - WoW miniatures. The saga of luck continues. With the first de luxe starter I got rare, epic figures. Another buys were also great, I didn't get almost any doubles. This is a great fun, especially when you can find good bargains. Emotions while opening boxes guaranteed!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Maxfield Stewart
United States
West Hills
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I enjoy it. Especially with miniatures. There's a mystery to the discovery process of whats in the box but I also come with a helpful dose of /not/ feeling like I need to own the whole set. I buy a large amount of whatever interests me and make do and I like knowing that there's always a singles market if I really have to have a particular piece/card.

If anything annoys me, it's that because I'm a booster case buyer, the barrier to entry to any game is about 2 to 3 times that of a standard board game. For example, I just picked up Angels 20 and that wasn't cheap for one booster case/starter. Well over $120. Yowch. It's a GREAT game, but man not cheap. Though when I compare it to what I spent on my miniatures for Wings of War, it's about the same all said and done.

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.