Recommend
29 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Glory to Rome» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Vitruvian Review: Glory to Rome rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Games Unlimited
United States
Pittsburgh
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
(Note: Vitruvian Reviews are not a review in the traditional sense. Instead I pull apart and discuss one or more interesting mechanics in a game.).

Contrary to the conventional tenets of game design that demand perfect balance in every facet of a game, Glory to Rome is a no-holds-barred, knock-down drag-out fight to find the most broken (read: insanely overpowered) combination of cards possible before your opponents do. No two games play out the same or even similarly, and in most cases it ends quite suddenly after one player instantly builds half a dozen buildings at once or immediately stockpiles every resource on the table. Controlling this chaos requires a few hard line restrictions, though, and Glory to Rome keeps things in check by limiting the way players acquire the cards they can use as buildings.

Each card performs multiple functions, acting as roles, clients, resources, and victory points in addition to being potential buildings themselves. As buildings they can create powerful game-changing effects, so it is appropriate that players are most restricted in which cards they lay this way. You can only play a card as a building if it comes from your hand, and the only way to take cards into your hand is from the draw pile. This is an important limitation because throughout the game cards are constantly shifting: from hand to play mat, play mat to pool, pool to stockpile, etc. But none of these shifts allow you to take an already revealed card and put it into your hand (from which it could be made into a building), nor do any combination of buildings create this effect. Cards in your hand are always drawn at random, so your choice of buildings to build is random as well.

To understand how important this is remember that the game is designed to have broken combinations. With 40 different buildings - millions of possible combinations - it’s possible that many combinations exist that would all but guarantee victory in every game. If players could cherry pick their buildings from the visible cards in the pool then each player would focus on collecting a specific combination, whether it’s the most optimum (viz. broken) or just a personal favorite. The discovery and play of finding creative combinations in your own hand would be lost because each game would become a race to the acquire known entities.

This building restriction has another important effect - you don’t have to consider your opponents’ combinations when placing a card into the pool. Players can enjoy the wacky combinations put into play - by themselves or an opponent - rather than trying to stop them from getting played. Some interference happens, of course; you can try to starve an opponent of a particular resource if you don’t want them to complete this or that building or gain a certain client. But allowing cards in the pool to be taken into hand and played as buildings would add an extra layer of decision-making, forcing you to consider whether the card you want to use as a role might give an opponent a larger advantage as a building. Keeping this dynamic out of the game prevents it from being a brain burning decision matrix and turns it instead into a playfully volatile experience.
23 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Stephen Stewart
United States
Visalia
California
flag msg tools
badge
It's sooo Hot out here...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
KTPrymus wrote:
But allowing cards in the pool to be taken into hand and played as buildings would add an extra layer of decision-making, forcing you to consider whether the card you want to use as a role might give an opponent a larger advantage as a building. Keeping this dynamic out of the game prevents it from being a brain burning decision matrix and turns it instead into a playfully volatile experience.



But that is the entire fun of GtR... you have to realize that when you use the role you LOSE the building potential....Risk vs Reward.


Your option only yields Reward vs. Reward.

Feel free to play the decision lacking game you suggest. Or better still Dominion/Race for the Galaxy is still for sale.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wakefield Morys-Carter
United Kingdom
Oxford
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
ASLChampion wrote:

But that is the entire fun of GtR... you have to realize that when you use the role you LOSE the building potential....Risk vs Reward.


Your option only yields Reward vs. Reward.

Feel free to play the decision lacking game you suggest. Or better still Dominion/Race for the Galaxy is still for sale.


I didn't think that the OP was actually suggesting that they wanted to be able to build from the pool. I read it that they like this aspect because it keeps the game fun, because it avoids a level of complexity that would be likely to lead to both narrow minded set collection (always going for the same buildings) and analysis paralysis (when worrying about what buildings to lose to the pool).
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pat McLaughlin
Australia
Canberra
A.C.T.
flag msg tools
badge
What's another word for Thesaurus?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
That's coz it's exactly what he meant.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.