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Subject: d20 sites? rss

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Devin Leung
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Are there d20 equivalents to BGG? I'm interested in learning about the systems, but not quite sure where to start.
 
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Jeremy Friesen
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EnWorld.org is probably the most popular.
 
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Ian
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If you really need to just ask someone, you can just message me. I've been playing d20 games off and on since DnD 3E was released.

If you have any questions, just ask.

Edit: Here is the enworld site: http://www.enworld.org/
 
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Devin Leung
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Red Metal wrote:
If you really need to just ask someone, you can just message me. I've been playing d20 games off and on since DnD 3E was released.

If you have any questions, just ask.

Edit: Here is the enworld site: http://www.enworld.org/


Thanks. I used to play AD&D 2/e, but that was a long time ago. I just want to see what the current state of the game is and see if it's worth exploring more.
 
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Jay Little
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In several regards, I actually think that d20 is a lot like GURPS. It was developed to apply to as many genres and settings as possble, but unlike Steve Jacksons' stranglehold on GURPS, the flexibility of the OGL/SRD materials allows numerous companies to use this engine as the core structure to design their own ideas around -- creating far more content on the market and far more options to the RPG community.

I love 3rd edition D&D (3.5, actually), although I must admit it is definitely designed to take advantage of the miniatures/combat aspects of the game. Actions, turn structures, magic, movement and numerous rules tucked into what appears to be an RPG actually make 3.5 D&D a miniatures game with strong RPG elements rather than the other way around.

That said, the group and the DM you play with dictate the tempo, pace, feel and focus of any game -- be it D&D, or even something diceless like Amber or Everway. But I like that 3.5 D&D has a lot to offer (in terms of content, character customization and as much rules detail as you're willing to embrace), allowing individual groups to use what they like, discard what they don't, and still end up with a playable game.

I'm also a bit biased, as d20 D&D currently pays my bills -- I write content for the d20 industry, specifically D&D modules and sourcebooks for fantasy settings and campaigns. The more I work with the d20 content and guidelines, the more I can appreciate how it has something to offer anyone -- and the more I can overlook some of the warts for its accessibility and variety.
 
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Brian M
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Quote:
In several regards, I actually think that d20 is a lot like GURPS. It was developed to apply to as many genres and settings as possble,

I wholeheartedly disagree. I think D20 was built from D&D rules, designed for D&D, and has been attempted to be forced square-peg in round hole fashion into a multi-genre system that its competely unsuited for. Its also absurdly complicated, highly unflexible, and has lots of other issues. I do like it quite a bit for what it is, but I think it has a lot of flaws and nowhere close to even being one of the better RPG systems available. But that's just my opinion.

As to the actual question, have you checked the actual WotC boards at www.wizards.com? You'll find very active forums on there.
 
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Stefan Pietraszak
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devinl wrote:
Are there d20 equivalents to BGG? I'm interested in learning about the systems, but not quite sure where to start.


You could start with the rules. Here's a link:
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=d20/article/srd35
And best of all: it's legal

It ain't the complete PHB/DMG/MM, though. But it should be more than enough to give you something to base your opinion on.

You could even find these core rules (the System Reference Document, SRD) in various formats and layouts on the net.
 
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Devin Leung
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Thanks. Looks like I'm going to have a bit of reading to do.
 
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Jay Little
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StormKnight wrote:
... attempted to be forced square-peg in round hole fashion into a multi-genre system that its competely unsuited for.


We'll agree to disagree about this.

I think the success of other d20-based game systems, like the Star Wars RPG, d20 Modern, d20 Ctulhu and numerous 3rd party d20 products like Mutants & Masterminds or Stargate show that there's an audience that appreciates the core rules and feels they apply to a wide variety of genres, settings and game styles.

StormKnight wrote:
Its also absurdly complicated, highly unflexible, and has lots of other issues.


I think d20 is a much simpler, streamlined and "teachable" version than any previous D&D edition. The core mechanics are only as complicated as rolling a d20 and adding a number to it. The perceived complexity comes in the nuances, details and minutae introduced to monitor (mostly) combat situations, and becomes as complicated or simple as the DM or players wish.

As for flexibility, that's a two-edged blade. On the one hand, there are numerous options for tailoring/customizing a character, from feats, skills, spells, prestige classes and equipment -- far more options than many other gmaes out there. However, there are some things D&D does "better" than others -- resolving games with physical conflict at its core, rather than political, spiritual or religious conflict.

Then again, any of these elements rely more on the DM and players than the system. Any system can succeed in any genre, given the right group of players willing to suspend disbelief and/or control for the good of the story. Even freeform games with high "flexibility" and player fiat (Everway, Nobilis, Amber, Heroquest) suffer from some flaws -- lack of content, ambiguous conflict resolutions, detached indifference to the welfare of your characters, feeling that actions are too heavily subject to referee arbitration over player decision, etc.

d20 is not without its flaws, but I still enjoy the system, warts and all, for the depth of available content, ease of teaching the system to others, numerous genre/setting possibilities, and ease of transitioning groups from one play style/environment to another.
 
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