Recommend
9 
 Thumb up
 Hide
35 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Tichu» Forums » Strategy

Subject: Mah Jong wish strategy rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm pretty much in a rut, when I have the Mah Jong card, of always wishing for the card that I passed to my left-hand opponent.

Sensing that I must be missing out on some other strategic possibilities, I looked around online for some discussions of Mah Jong wish strategy. I'll cut and paste in below what I found. If anyone has comments on these discussions (or thoughts of your own on Mah Jong wish strategy), I would be interested in hearing these.

----------------------------------------------

From "Spotlight on Games" (http://spotlightongames.com/analysis/tichu.html)

Keep Your Eye on the Sparrow

If the opponents declare Grand Tichu and you are holding the Dog, pass it to the Declarer. This should help foul up the escape plan. If you're holding the Mah Jongg, see that it gets to the teammate immediately ahead of the Declarer. Then use it to request an Ace. This almost always works and even though it likely hands over the lead, this was bound to happen anyway. Meanwhile your team probably saved a King or two for a winner later in the hand.

If you don't hold the Mah Jongg, try to give the teammate immediately ahead of a Tichu declarer a very good card such as an Ace, Dragon or Phoenix. This player is the last line of defense before the declarer going out and is in the best position to prevent it if provided the proper ammunition.

If you have a bomb, give careful consideration of when to play it. It may be tempting to bring it right out to steal away the lead, but unless the rest of your cards form one long straight, you may end up just giving it right back again. Instead, keep in mind that many Tichu declarations are shaky and depend on ending with a strong combination followed by a weak one. Thus, if you can bomb what you suspect to be the second-to-last intended lead, you may just succeed in leaving the declarer unable to win it back.

When You Wish Upon a Six

Usually it's not a good idea to make a wish when you lead the Mah Jongg as part of a straight. That sort of wish is hard to satisfy and the person who ends up fulfilling it might just be your partner, wasting one of his winners, or even yourself, spoiling your next lead. But when the sparrow is led alone, it's often best to wish for the card you just passed. Who knows how powerful a straight, full house, pair series or even bomb you might sabotage.

But say you passed the Dog or a low card which you know from the rest of your hand cannot be in anything serious. In this case, you may like to request a 5 or 6 as it's nearly impossible for anyone to have a lowish straight that does not include at least one of these cards. Choose the rank that you have already seen the most in the hand. Of course, sometimes this may boomerang and instead strike your partner, who is likely to calm down after you finish explaining what you were trying to do.

-----------------------------------------------------

From "Take On Rules" (http://takeonrules.com/2011/02/07/the-mah-jong-of-tichu/)

Strategy

When in doubt, wish for what you passed to the player who’s turn it is next. This is a safe bet; You already know they have the card. But it seems a bit weak. After all, they received the card from you. So it seems to me to be more likely to not fit well with their hand unless of course it is the card that bridged a bunch of singletons into a straight.

Another option is to wish for the card you should’ve seen in the pass. After all, if you didn’t have a Two and no one passed you a Two, there may very well be a bomb of Twos out there. Nothing sucks quite so bad as sitting there all smug knowing you have a bomb of Fours and having that bomb wished for…Except of course having multiple Aces ripped from your hand.

A third option is to wish for an Ace, particularly if your partner passed you an Ace. If a person was thinking of calling Tichu, having their Ace wished out can give them pause. It certainly doesn’t let them sit back and play the hand management game biding their time to safely offload that one losing hand.

If you have the Mah Jong as part of a run, the options become very interesting. You can wish for a card that would ensure one or two cards left behind. If you start with a Mah Jong to Four run, and wish for a Four it is possible someone has a seven card run, Two to Eight, that now has a Seven and Eight stranded in their hand. It is also entirely possible that someone might need to use the Phoenix to construct a run that can fulfill the wish.

And then there is the lobotomy of wishes: Leading with a run and wishing for an Ace, only to have everyone pass. The following up with a triple and watching your opponent howl in rage as they play two Aces and the Phoenix to fulfill the wish.

Passing the Mah Jong

Never pass the Bird to an opponent. Given it’s strength, arming your opponent with this card is simply a bad idea.

I typically pass the Mah Jong to my partner if I don’t have all that many low cards. My assumption is that my partner will likely be able to convert a heap of junk into a simple five card run.

---------------------------------


Steve Blanding (http://hfog.blogspot.com/2006/04/tichu-part-2-strategy.html)

The Mah Jong

The Mah Jong is powerful for two reasons: first, it gives you the initial lead, and second, it allows you to call for a card. That second ability should not be underrated.

Quite often I'll call for the card that I just passed to the player who will play after me. That's a good idea for several reasons: it will spoil any bomb that I might have just given him, it ensures that I don't pull a crucial card out of my partner's hand by mistake, and (since usually I've just called for a low card) it gives my partner a chance to unload a low singleton, improving his hand.

Don't forget that the Mah Jong can be part of a run. If you can unload a run of low cards on that first lead then by all means do so. But if you do, consider carefully which card you call for. Calling for a card and then leading a run means that it's far less likely that your opponent will be forced to play that card on this trick, since it will also need to be in a run. If you've played a five card run and called for a card that just happens to be in your partner's six card run, you've just ruined his hand. In that case, you might want to consider calling for a very low card, perhaps a deuce, just to be safe.

One other ploy, particularly if you know that either you or your partner has the Dragon, is to call for an Ace in the hopes of forcing your opponent to give up strength early. I've seen this used successfully on occasion but it's risky and I've seen it backfire many times as well. I really don’t recommend it.

You should rarely consider passing the Mah Jong. While it guarantees a lead, your partner may not have expected it and he may not know what card to call out with it. Of course a good player will always remember what he's passed so getting passed a Mah Jong shouldn't really be a problem but the risk usually outweighs the potential benefit.

------------------------------------------

Me again. Clearly there is some disagreement here. Steve Blanding disagrees with Take on Rules about wishing for an ace, and about passing the Mah Jong to your partner.

Any thoughts on this, or on any other point from the above discussion? Any thoughts of your own on Mah Jong wish strategy?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David desJardins
United States
Burlingame
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It's not uncommon for me to wish for the card I passed to the right, especially when I haven't seen any other cards of that rank. E.g., my LHO might have kept a pair of 2's and have to play one of them, or my RHO might have a bomb of 2's, etc.

Wishing a middle card to break up straights is more attractive when I have a long straight myself, and the pass makes it more likely that other players have straights. Also more attractive when I have the Phoenix, as breaking up a straight is less of a gain if the opponent has the Phoenix to fill in the straight or combine his cards in other ways.

Of course, wishing when I lead a straight is a totally different set of issues.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Curt Carpenter
United States
Kirkland
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The only time I will ever wish Ace is when LHO has called GT. My normal partner does it more often, and it seems uncanny the number of times it hits me, which drives me crazy, especially since the opponent between us gets to unload a free low single of their choosing. I think is what Steve Blanding was talking about.

I like a 6 wish when you think your hand is crappy, and you suspect from your partner's pass that their hasn't isn't too great either. Meaning, you're probably going to lose the hand anyway, so try to bust something up that will cause real damage (higher risk/reward). If I have a lot of 2s or 3s I might raise that to 7 or 8.

If I think my partner's hand is good, particularly when I have also passed Dr/Ph to him, I like to wish a 2. This gives my partner the best possible entry into the hand. This is also why I pass even left / odd right, to support this scenario, meaning being able to know if I've given the LHO a 2. It's also generally good for me if I have mid-range singles, as it keeps the trick from growing too fast, giving me a chance of getting back in before it goes too high.

I will generally avoid wishing what I passed (except 2 and I think my partner is strong, as above), except when I pass contrary to convention.

If the next single I want to play is QKA, I will often wish for 1 under whichever that card is, which often holds until it gets back around to me.

I will almost never make a wish on a straight. The main exception is when I have a cover for my own straight, in which case I will wish for one under the low end of my cover straight. This can force people to create singles, and still not win the trick. Of course occasionally I pull my partner's straight, but it seems to pay off on average. If my straight is very long and I think there's a good chance it will walk, and I have a few more singles to get rid of, I will wish for 1 over the single I plan to play after I win the straight. This helps to keep the next single trick low until it gets back around to me. And of course hopefully mess up my LHO.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David desJardins
United States
Burlingame
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
curtc wrote:
The only time I will ever wish Ace is when LHO has called GT. My normal partner does it more often, and it seems uncanny the number of times it hits me, which drives me crazy


Are these hands where you passed him Dragon or Phoenix? It's pretty rare for me to pass Dragon or Phoenix when I do have an Ace, and usually if that happens we have so much strength we haven't lost much.

On the other hand, if he's wishing for an Ace on hands where you passed him a 7, well, one has to wonder what he's thinking.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Curt Carpenter
United States
Kirkland
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
DaviddesJ wrote:
curtc wrote:
The only time I will ever wish Ace is when LHO has called GT. My normal partner does it more often, and it seems uncanny the number of times it hits me, which drives me crazy


Are these hands where you passed him Dragon or Phoenix? It's pretty rare for me to pass Dragon or Phoenix when I do have an Ace, and usually if that happens we have so much strength we haven't lost much.

On the other hand, if he's wishing for an Ace on hands where you passed him a 7, well, one has to wonder what he's thinking.

The latter.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David desJardins
United States
Burlingame
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Well, it's not "uncanny" if he's wishing for an Ace when you pass him a low card and it's hitting you a lot. It's completely and entirely predictable.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
DaviddesJ wrote:
It's not uncommon for me to wish for the card I passed to the right, especially when I haven't seen any other cards of that rank. E.g., my LHO might have kept a pair of 2's and have to play one of them, or my RHO might have a bomb of 2's, etc.


I take it that in this case you do NOT open the round with Mah Jong, right? (You wouldn't want to risk accidentally sabotaging your partner's hand straight out of the gate, right? And it's only after at least a trick or two that you have enough evidence that the card you passed to your RHO is unusually absent, right?)

That leads to a more general question: about how often do you open a round with the Mah Jong, and how often do you save it for a later trick?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Curt Carpenter
United States
Kirkland
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
About the only time I don't open with the mahjong is when I have some low shape with a high enough cover that I expect to win the with it. Or when my partner passes me the dog and I'm pretty sure I wont win a single trick. I don't want him thinking the dog can help him when it can't. At least those are about the only two cases I can think of.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David desJardins
United States
Burlingame
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
cdunc123 wrote:
I take it that in this case you do NOT open the round with Mah Jong, right?


Wrong. I'm not sure where you got that idea.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
DaviddesJ wrote:
cdunc123 wrote:
I take it that in this case you do NOT open the round with Mah Jong, right?


Wrong. I'm not sure where you got that idea.


I'm still rather new to the game (less than a dozen plays) so maybe I misunderstood you. I was puzzled by your qualifier "...especially when I haven't seen any other cards of that rank.". At the time of the pass you have only seen the cards you were dealt. So would the following case be an example of what you have in mind? You are dealt a singleton 3, you pass it right, you open with the Mah Jong. Since you haven't seen any other cards of rank 3, you wish for a 3. (I'm not implying you'd automatically do this in such a situation; of course it'd depend on the other cards in your hand, what you were passed, the current score, etc.)

If this is an example of what you have in mind, I'm surprised one might treat a singleton 3 in your deal as enough a clue that your RHO might have gained a nice combo as a result of being passed your 3. Of course it is SOME clue of this; but is it ENOUGH to run the risk of sabotaging your partner's hand? (You know your partner doesn't have a 3-bomb of course, but by wishing for a 3 you could wreck a partner's straight, pair series, or full house. That seems risky to me.)

So my original thought was that you must have in mind a case where you had more data suggesting your RHO had some kind of 3 combo. And this data could only be gathered if you didn't open with the Mah Jong.

Anyway, that was my thinking. I'd be interested to hear you speak to the risk of sabotaging your partner by calling for what you passed to your RHO. Maybe I'm too risk averse on that front.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David desJardins
United States
Burlingame
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
cdunc123 wrote:
So would the following case be an example of what you have in mind? You are dealt a singleton 3, you pass it right, you open with the Mah Jong. Since you haven't seen any other cards of rank 3, you wish for a 3.


Yes, except that I usually pass odd left so this couldn't happen. It would be a better example with a 2.

Quote:
If this is an example of what you have in mind, I'm surprised one might treat a singleton 3 in your deal as enough a clue that your RHO might have gained a nice combo as a result of being passed your 3. Of course it is SOME clue of this; but is it ENOUGH to run the risk of sabotaging your partner's hand? (You know your partner doesn't have a 3-bomb of course, but by wishing for a 3 you could wreck a partner's straight, pair series, or full house. That seems risky to me.)


Life is a risk. You can only consider the odds. My LHO has to play before my partner, so it's more likely to affect him. I may have good reason to believe my partner has a relatively weak hand (e.g., he passed me an ace), so it's less important what I do to his hand. I know that my LHO didn't pass a 2 (and in this example I'm assuming the opponents are playing odd left also) so either he wasn't dealt any 2's, or he chose to keep one because it was part of some combo. I don't have that same information about my partner so he's (somewhat) less likely to have a combo containing a 2.

Things would be different if we're playing odd left but the opponents are playing even left. I haven't thought much about that. The logic here is mostly based on the fact that they are passing in the same way that we are.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
curtc wrote:
If I think my partner's hand is good, particularly when I have also passed Dr/Ph to him, I like to wish a 2. This gives my partner the best possible entry into the hand.


I mentioned in my reply to David that I'm pretty worried about accidentally sabotaging my partner's hand. So if I didn't pass my LHO a 2 I'd be worried that in wishing for a 2 I'd wreck a combo from my partner, in the case where my LHO has no 2. That risk seems to me to outweigh the possible gain you mention (easy entry into the trick). If you passed the PH he can repair his combo by using the PH as a 2, true, but this will have other opportunity costs...

Am I overestimating the risk of hurting your partner?

(Also, if you and your partner are using an "even left" convention then your partner won't have passed a 2 to your LHO. Plus if your opponents are using the same convention there is a decent chance your LHO passed a 2 to your partner...)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Oops. I botched the block quote from Curt in my previous reply. Sorry. I'd fix it with an edit but I only have iPhone access now and a fix is too cumbersome for me!

Edit: Fixed it now.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David desJardins
United States
Burlingame
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
cdunc123 wrote:
I mentioned in my reply to David that I'm pretty worried about accidentally sabotaging my partner's hand.


If you are just learning the game, it makes perfect sense to just wish for the card you passed. You can't do any harm that way. Over time, you will develop experience that helps you judge when to do something else.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Curt Carpenter
United States
Kirkland
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
cdunc123 wrote:
...I'm pretty worried about accidentally sabotaging my partner's hand. So if I didn't pass my LHO a 2 I'd be worried that in wishing for a 2 I'd wreck a combo from my partner, in the case where my LHO has no 2. That risk seems to me to outweigh the possible gain you mention (easy entry into the trick).

I usually wish a 2 when and because I pass a 2. The ONLY reason I do this is to give my partner the easiest entry possible. Again, specifically when the pass indicates that my P has the stronger hand, and/or I want the trick to stay low to unload another mid single. Hence the even left passing convention, as I mentioned. And 2 is usually the only card that I wish for that I passed. (Or rarely 3, only because 3 is against my passing convention)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
curtc wrote:
cdunc123 wrote:
...I'm pretty worried about accidentally sabotaging my partner's hand. So if I didn't pass my LHO a 2 I'd be worried that in wishing for a 2 I'd wreck a combo from my partner, in the case where my LHO has no 2. That risk seems to me to outweigh the possible gain you mention (easy entry into the trick).

I usually wish a 2 when and because I pass a 2. The ONLY reason I do this is to give my partner the easiest entry possible. Again, specifically when the pass indicates that my P has the stronger hand, and/or I want the trick to stay low to unload another mid single. Hence the even left passing convention, as I mentioned. And 2 is usually the only card that I wish for that I passed. (Or rarely 3, only because 3 is against my passing convention)



Oh, right. Looking back, I see I didn't read your first post carefully. You were clear about this there.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
curtc wrote:
About the only time I don't open with the mahjong is when I have some low shape with a high enough cover that I expect to win the with it. Or when my partner passes me the dog and I'm pretty sure I wont win a single trick. I don't want him thinking the dog can help him when it can't. At least those are about the only two cases I can think of.


Hi Curt,

If I could trouble you with one more question, I'd like to ask about the comment you made, which I have quoted above.

By "low shape," did you mean "low straight" (including the Mah Jong)? Or is "low shape" a generic label for some combination containing low cards (e.g. a low full house, a series of low pairs, etc.)? If the latter (i.e. if "low shape" is a generic term for any combo with low cards) then non-straight low combos wouldn't contain the Mah Jong, which leaves me a bit confused.

So you mean to describe a case when you have a low straight with the Mah Jong, and a second straight that is high enough that you think it will win the trick, right?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff Chunko
United States
Columbus
Ohio
flag msg tools
mb
I'm answering for Curt, but "low shape" pretty clearly means any meld involving large numbers of low cards. Most likely a low ladder of some length, or a full house.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff Chunko
United States
Columbus
Ohio
flag msg tools
mb


You don't have to lead the 1. So if he had 22334455, you lead that first, and then presuming it wins, or you can cover higher, then you follow with the 1 later.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Curt Carpenter
United States
Kirkland
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
cdunc123 wrote:
curtc wrote:
About the only time I don't open with the mahjong is when I have some low shape with a high enough cover that I expect to win the with it. Or when my partner passes me the dog and I'm pretty sure I wont win a single trick. I don't want him thinking the dog can help him when it can't. At least those are about the only two cases I can think of.

By "low shape," did you mean "low straight" (including the Mah Jong)?

I still consider a straight from 1 to be opening with the mahjong. The point I was discussing is when I lead without the mahjong.

cdunc123 wrote:
Or is "low shape" a generic label for some combination containing low cards (e.g. a low full house, a series of low pairs, etc.)? If the latter (i.e. if "low shape" is a generic term for any combo with low cards) then non-straight low combos wouldn't contain the Mah Jong, which leaves me a bit confused.

Yes. You don't have to lead with a combo including the 1, as Jeff mentioned. But clearly you already understood this by your question to David above, so now I'm confused as to why you're confused. zombie

cdunc123 wrote:
So you mean to describe a case when you have a low straight with the Mah Jong, and a second straight that is high enough that you think it will win the trick, right?

Any combo without the mahjong that I think I have sufficient cover for. Of course I may also do it with a straight including the mahjong, but the original point was cases where I would lead without the mahjong.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
For some reason I assumed "low shape" included the 1. That was what confused me (since the only shape possible with a 1 is a straight why say "shape" instead of "straight", I wondered). Not sure why I assumed you meant a low shape with the 1. I gotta stop reading BGG and posting from my iPhone while on the bus. Apparently my comprehension skills go way down.

As you say I realize you don't have to lead the 1. In my previous post I wasn't assuming the low straight with the 1 that I had in mind was the opening lead.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Jeff Chunko wrote:


You don't have to lead the 1. So if he had 22334455, you lead that first, and then presuming it wins, or you can cover higher, then you follow with the 1 later.


Jeff,

By "cover" you mean a second combo of the same kind and same number of cards, but higher in value (so it could be played later on the same trick) -- right? Just asking, because unless I am failing to see something (and given my track record in this thread, that is not improbable...), I can't see how you might have cover for a 22334455 pair series. You'd need another eight cards, but that would require a sixteen card hand...

And parenthetically, let me ask about pair series. I've heard these referred to as "ladders" (as in a previous post by Jeff to this thread), I've heard them called "stepladders," or "consecutive pairs," or "stairs,"... Has any nickname emerged as most common -- say, on the online gaming sites?

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff Chunko
United States
Columbus
Ohio
flag msg tools
mb
22334455 is an obvious lead. You're never going to get to play it unless you lead it, and it's almost certain to win. But 2233 while holding jj00 is also strong. You're very likely to win if covered, and if you don't, they've wasted a ton of high cards.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Blanding
United States
Redmond
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
cdunc123 wrote:
Clearly there is some disagreement here. Steve Blanding disagrees with Take on Rules about wishing for an ace, and about passing the Mah Jong to your partner.


Naw. I don't think there's so much disagreement. All three articles you cite have merit.

Don't read my comment as meaning "Never wish for an Ace". Although it's something that I would rarely do (and I listed the reasons why I thought it could be damaging). I've seen it work and there are times (Curt's mentioned some) when it can be a good ploy.

And definitely don't think that I meant that passing the Mah Jong to your partner is always a bad idea. Just be sure that you're playing with someone who always remembers what they passed and who knows how to use it. Your passing strategy should ALWAYS be aimed at improving the chances that someone in your partnership will go out first. That generally means concentrating strength in one of the two hands, communicating something about what you are holding, and/or creating some sort of synergy between the two hands (so that they compliment one another). Granted, that's pretty hard to do when you can only exchange one card with each other but, hey, we're talking ideals here.

By the way, Curt and I have played Tichu together on many occasions, both as partners and opponents, and I'd say that he probably has a better grasp on the strategy than I do. So listen to what he says, Grasshopper.

Great topic for a post. Kind of cool to see my old article quoted here.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Craig Duncan
United States
Ithaca
New York
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for weighing in to the discussion, Steve. And thanks for programming the Tichu app for the iPhone. Without that, I probably never would have managed to learn the game!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.