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1860: Railways on the Isle of Wight» Forums » Rules

Subject: Buy shares then sell them rss

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Leandro Ronderos
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GIJON
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Rules state that you cant buy shares from a company if you have sell shares from the company for that round.

But i'm not sure if this is possible:

3 player game: A,B and C

Supose:

A sells 0, buy 1 IOW
B pass
C pass
A sells 0, buy 1 IOW
B pass
C pass
A sells 0, buy 1 IOW
B pass
C pass
A sells 3 IOW buy 0 - IOW's share price drops 3 spaces (not red zone)
B pass
C pass
A pass ending the Stock Round

Is this right?

Ty very much.
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J C Lawrence
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Yes, of course.

Note that if IOW does not have a train then the shares sell for half price.
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Leandro Ronderos
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Thanks a lot
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According to the rule

"On a player’s turn, he/she may sell any number of shares (including none), and then buy one share. Otherwise he/she must “pass”."

I think "A sells 3 IOW buy 0"is incorrect, player must buy one certificate and cannot just sell shares without buying anything, so it should be "A sells 3 IOW buy 1 share of other company.

Am I correct??
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José San Miguel
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newbiebgg wrote:
According to the rule

"On a player’s turn, he/she may sell any number of shares (including none), and then buy one share. Otherwise he/she must “pass”."

I think "A sells 3 IOW buy 0"is incorrect, player must buy one certificate and cannot just sell shares without buying anything, so it should be "A sells 3 IOW buy 1 share of other company.

Am I correct??


No, you're not.
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Adam Badura
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Jose-san wrote:
newbiebgg wrote:
According to the rule

"On a player’s turn, he/she may sell any number of shares (including none), and then buy one share. Otherwise he/she must “pass”."

I think "A sells 3 IOW buy 0"is incorrect, player must buy one certificate and cannot just sell shares without buying anything, so it should be "A sells 3 IOW buy 1 share of other company.

Am I correct??


No, you're not.


Well, I'm not a native of English but for me if the quoted sentence would be taken literarly then indeed selling alone would not be allowed. Yet the intend of the rules was not that way. It is sell, buy, or sell then buy while not buy then sell.
 
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mfl134
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just a quick follow up on this:

When you sell shares, you sell them all for the current price before decreasing, right?




and the strategic followup:

Does this happen a lot in this game? It would seem like you can run down the price of a RR fairly easily.

Or do you occasionally get burned as the other player sells their stock to put you at a loss?

Or is it just a case of income from stock are so much more valuable than the increases/decreases in stock value that you end up holding it?




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JR
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1. Yes

2. It happens. A "lot" is undefined. Maybe? The way that share prices "zig zag" backward on sales actually reduces the effect somewhat. Additionally, there are areas of the stock market that cause the first sold share to be ignored, (so three sold shares equals two 'zig zags' backward).

3. In other games, yes. In 1860 it's a somewhat less useful tactic. With the way that stock values can jump as many as four times in a single dividend, such losses are quickly recuperated. Also, in 1860 it is often important to hold on to some shares to avoid allowing another player to isolate a huge majority in a company which he will then turn into a juggernaut company. ***

4. "It depends" on so many factors. The stage in the game, the current state of affairs for each company. Earlier in the game it less of an issue to sell off some stocks and fire up a new company, especially if you foresee said stocks going insolvent for some duration. As the game gets on, it starts to become important to have carved out a nice portfolio because the cert limit disappears and then everything is bought and if you find yourself behind in share count measurably, it can nullify your very good shares.


*** In a recent game of 1860 on Keith Thomasson's web game portal, I actually sold my own company's shares down into bankruptcy. Doing so gave me the smallest portfolio and thus earned me priority deal for the new stock round that started immediately as a result of the bankruptcy. I then got to re-float that same company for max par value (and it received all its prior assets) and I won that game mostly thanks to that gambit. So, share prices moving from sales isn't always to hurt other people. The sweetest part of that deal? When I sold the shares into bankruptcy, I received current stock value for each while my opponents lost theirs without compensation. robot
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mfl134
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jrebelo wrote:
1. Yes

2. It happens. A "lot" is undefined. Maybe? The way that share prices "zig zag" backward on sales actually reduces the effect somewhat. Additionally, there are areas of the stock market that cause the first sold share to be ignored, (so three sold shares equals two 'zig zags' backward).

3. In other games, yes. In 1860 it's a somewhat less useful tactic. With the way that stock values can jump as many as four times in a single dividend, such losses are quickly recuperated. Also, in 1860 it is often important to hold on to some shares to avoid allowing another player to isolate a huge majority in a company which he will then turn into a juggernaut company. ***

4. "It depends" on so many factors. The stage in the game, the current state of affairs for each company. Earlier in the game it less of an issue to sell off some stocks and fire up a new company, especially if you foresee said stocks going insolvent for some duration. As the game gets on, it starts to become important to have carved out a nice portfolio because the cert limit disappears and then everything is bought and if you find yourself behind in share count measurably, it can nullify your very good shares.


*** In a recent game of 1860 on Keith Thomasson's web game portal, I actually sold my own company's shares down into bankruptcy. Doing so gave me the smallest portfolio and thus earned me priority deal for the new stock round that started immediately as a result of the bankruptcy. I then got to re-float that same company for max par value (and it received all its prior assets) and I won that game mostly thanks to that gambit. So, share prices moving from sales isn't always to hurt other people. The sweetest part of that deal? When I sold the shares into bankruptcy, I received current stock value for each while my opponents lost theirs without compensation. robot


Thanks.

So it seems like in the right situation it can be really nasty. But if the company was already sitting good enough, you might run into the other players just buying up all the shares, which allows them to reap all the rewards of a good company and stops others from any stock shenanigans later.
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