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Subject: mathmaticaly speaking who would win? rss

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bob stone
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So i am doing some research basicaly googling meditation and chess. And an article pops up saying that the openings of chess have been analised to death and that it is the middle game where the real game play starts and such. So i was wondering if player A makes X move and player B make Y move will there always be an approperiate move for a player untill checkmate?

If so would you say that it would be the same for the game of GO or baduk or weichi?

PS this will be my last question on chess theory i think.
 
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Ross G.
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Wisdom begins in wonder.
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Yes, there will always be a perfect move, it's just the nature of these types of games. When chess is eventually "solved" (meaning a computer has worked out the ramifications of every possible move) it may turn out not to end in checkmate, as it's possible a draw is the best white can hope for assuming perfect play.
 
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Curt Carpenter
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There will always be a perfect move (although not necessarily ending in checkmate, as Ross said)... if you assume that the other side also has unlimited memory and look-ahead. That's actually a fairly significant caveat. Because if you're playing against something like a human (none of whom meet that criteria), then a move that is non-optimal against another perfect opponent might actually be better, based on what you think they are likely to do.
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Paul W
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In any two player, deterministic, sequential game one of the following statement must be true:

- the game can end in a tie
- either the first or second player (depending on the game in question) can always force a win

Now, in practice any game of interest has a decision tree large enough that this theorem is irrelevant because players don't know what the optimal path is, but in theory yes, chess is a solvable game.
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Brandon M
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Listen to the Ludology podcast, they recently discussed something along these lines recently (in the context of Checkers being "solved").
 
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Matt Davis
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mugs wrote:
(in the context of Checkers being "solved").


See also Connect 4.
 
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