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Ticket to Ride: USA 1910» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Your Guide to Ticket to Ride: The 1910 Expansion rss

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Derek Thompson
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Ticket to Ride has become an international phenomenon since its Spiel des Jahres win in 2004, so much so that I recently was happy to discover a few copies at the local Barnes & Noble. Mainstream market penetration is no easy feat in a country dominated by thousands of themed reprints of Monopoly and Clue. There’s no denying that Ticket to Ride is a fantastic game worthy of its success, but you probably already knew that. Maybe what you don’t know is the best way(s) to acquire and play the game, now that it’s become quite a production with four stand-alone board games, a card game, and five expansions for the board games (and a sixth on the way).

Rather than post a regular review for each one, I intend to make this a multi-part series where I give you a survey of what I like and don’t like about each entry in the series. Here we’ll cover the 1910 expansion to the original Ticket to Ride.

USA 1910

Ticket to Ride 1910As I mentioned above, there are some imbalances with the gameplay in the original Ticket to Ride, and this expansion was a clever, simple way to fix the problem. The expansion doesn’t alter the gameplay at all - it’s just more tickets, a bonus card, and ways to combine tickets. The new "Globetrotter" bonus card gives 15 points to the player who completed the most tickets, making short, quick runs a viable strategy against a long east-west continuous route. Furthermore, many of the new "1910″ tickets include tougher connections, especially on some of the long routes, hitting some cities completely ignored in the original game (Washington and Las Vegas, for example). Las Vegas in particular becomes an important city with only two ways to connect.

While the "1910″ variant uses an entirely new ticket deck, there is also a "Big Cities" variant using some old, some new, all of which connect to at least one of the following cities: Los Angeles, Seattle, Miami, Houston, Dallas, New York, and Chicago. I enjoy this variant quite a bit, because different parts of the map become more contested, and it’s much easier for beginners to predict the strategies of others without memorizing the ticket deck, since they can guess at least one of your goal cities. The last variant is simply to mix all of the tickets together and deal out more at the beginning. I’m not as intrigued with this version, since it’s much harder to reward yourself for building in a certain region, and it’s too easy to find arbitrary piles of 20-point tickets in one peek, all of which you can keep. Having both bonus cards in play does allow for more options, though.

Apart from fixing the gameplay in the simplest way possible, the expansion also comes with a regular-size replacement deck for all of the original destination ticket and train car cards. It’s a nice touch, but it makes me realize that six years have passed since the original game was published, which means that by now this entire expansion should be included with the base game. If they bothered to print the base game cards at a reasonable size, all that’s really in this expansion is about 40 cards, and that’s not worth $14-$20. While I think the original game absolutely needs this expansion, I can’t help be a bit bitter about the unnecessary expense.

Pros: Bigger cards, balances gameplay, more gameplay options

Cons: Should be included in the base game, it’s basically just 40 cards

Although it’s maybe not as intriguing as its successors, the simple elegance of the original Ticket to Ride is what makes it so appealing - it has a lot of fun without a lot of rules. Once you’ve mastered that level of skill, the 1910 expansion keeps the game interesting without making it any more complicated, something expansions very rarely do. If you’re new to the series, I strongly suggest you start here, especially if you’re most familiar with American geography. Even if you’ve already started with another entry in the series, you still owe it to yourself to play the original - you may find its simplicity even more engaging than the other versions, and it’s much easier for people to learn and enjoy. I’m confident this title will be a classic for many more years.

Originally posted on http://www.meepletown.com
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Andy Andersen
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Very good review. We only use this with the base game now.
 
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Jeff Shoot
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Helpful review... this is what makes BGG such a great resource! Thanks!
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Austin Boyle
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Orangemoose wrote:
Very good review. We only use this with the base game now.


I have been tryint to research the difference in card sizes. We currently own just the base Ticket to Ride. I would like to purchase this expansion because I love it on the iPad. So the original comes with 144 cards sized for Mini European Board Game Sleeves (44x68 MM). This expansion adds "181 new large format cards". So should I be ordering 200 sleeves of Standard European Board Game Sleeves (59x92 MM)? Or what combination of sleeves would be ideal for Ticket to Ride and the 1910 expansion? Thank you for your help.
-Austin
 
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Derek Thompson
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Waaaaait! Ironically, despite being a Eurogame, 1910 uses "USA Standard" card size (56x87, I think). It's a bit smaller than "European Standard". You don't need sleeves (Mini Euro) for the base game if you are getting the expansion, because the expansion replaces every single card in the base game with an identical USA Standard card, in addition to the new cards. All you need are the USA cards (probably 4 packs of 50 is what you'll end up getting). I recommend FFG's sleeves, though unfortunately the sleeved cards are a bit too thick to get back into the insert correctly. Mayday's thin crappy sleeves might get you in there, but, well, they suck (flimsy, tear easily, unevenly cut).

Actually, even though I am really OCD about sleeving cards most of the time, I haven't sleeved Ticket to Ride for a couple of reasons. One is that it's a lot harder to shuffle, and because you discard cards in sets, the discard is totally clumped together (6 pink, 6 orange, 5 yellow, etc) when you go to reshuffle and it needs a GOOD shufflin'. The second reason is that it'll be like $10 to sleeve the cards, which, for that price, you can just buy the expansion again if you actually ever need to - unlikely, especially because DoW is awesome about replacement parts.

Hope that helped.

Edit: For reference, I've played probably 50-60 F2F games (at least) with the 1910 cards, and they're still as good as new, not even grimy or anything. Then again, one spilled pop is all it takes....!
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Austin Boyle
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Ohhhh. Phew.. nice save and great point about sleeves compared to new cards, guess it would only take bad luck to ruin a second set. Sounds great and amen about he shuffling part. Thank you for the advice.
Austin
 
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