Mac Mcleod
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http://domesticfuel.com/2011/07/05/renewable-energy-producti...

Quote:
Notwithstanding the recent nuclear accident in Japan, among many others, and the rapid growth in energy and electricity from renewable sources, congressional Republicans continue to press for more nuclear energy funding while seeking deep cuts in renewable energy investments, said Ken Bossong, Executive Director of the SUN DAY Campaign. One has to wonder ‘what are these people thinking?’



Well firstly, I don't see that it's a republican issue...

http://www.grist.org/nuclear/2011-06-03-is-pro-nuke-enthusia...
Quote:
But the industry has soldiered on, trying to present the public with a picture of nuclear as a clean, safe, and cheap energy option. In many ways, it's been successful: Nuclear power is now accepted as a firm element of the energy portfolio by the American political mainstream, across party lines. Under President George W. Bush, new loan guarantees were promised in 2005, and the industry celebrated that promise as a turn toward a new age of building nuclear plants. President Barack Obama has asked Congress to triple those guarantees to $54.5 billion.


And just as the private prison industry lobbies for more laws... the nuclear lobby lobbies for carbon regulation and pollution standards... raising the cost to its competitors.

That being said, the downside of nuclear is so high when it does go wrong, that I view it as a bridge technology. However, the renewable industries may not scale the way nuclear and coal do. On the other hand, they may scale the way computer chips did- in which case they are going to be fantastically cheap within 10 years.
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lotus dweller
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Wow - thats amazing. I thought alternative was still vanishingly small in contribution.

As I understand it more alternative energies are produced close to the final user.
If so it would be interesting to see a measure of the added efficiency this allows. Perhaps "energy consumption by source" figures would do this?

***Ask and WP will do something.
Fuel type 2006 US consumption in PWh
Oil 11.71
Gas 6.50
Coal 6.60
Hydroelectric 0.84
Nuclear 2.41
Geothermal, wind,
solar, wood, waste 0.95
Total 29.26

2006 US Consumption: 1.79PWh(alt) vs 2.41PWh(nuclear) in 2006. Ratio of sources = 74%
[2006 US Production: 3.937PWh(alt including incinerators) vs 7.87PWh(nuclear) Ratio of sources = 50%] *

If this has continued and more alternative energy than nuclear is now being produced(Ratio of sources = >100%), then the consumption ratio will have shifted from 74% (2006) to >130% (2011).

*(Assuming 0.01 PWh = 1 billion kWh)
 
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Mac Mcleod
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The solar output has gone up by 1000% during the same period other technologies have gone up by less than 100%. If it maintains the pace, it will be 10% of our energy production in 2022.

I'm going to solar soon. The savings are like a tax free investment. I estimate I can get an 8% return per year if power prices do not increase-- which will be like an 11% or 12% taxable return. So in about 8 or 9 years, it will be paid for and then continue to produce for another 10 to 15 years free except for batteries and inverters every ~7 years.

I was also looking at a 400 watt wind generator too.


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Here, let me contribute:
 
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