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Confusion: Espionage and Deception in the Cold War» Forums » General

Subject: Quick first impressions... rss

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Chris Larkin
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I had a chance to play 2 games of this with my 13 year old son a couple weeks ago, and I thought I'd post our thoughts on the game.

*Notes can get screwy: In both games, we both ended up with notes that didn't match our pieces, this could be because of confusion around what is forward and what is backward on the pieces, but I don't think so. I think it centers around the double agent. When you figure out exactly what piece something is, you are inclined to draw a vertical line through every other piece with that movement, but if your double agent is still around, you don't actually know that for sure.

*Trying to bluff your opponent near his back row doesn't work. If you bring the briefcase near victory, your opponent will try to kill it even if he doesn't know his pieces movement. Hoping he wont try that because he hasn't tried to move that piece yet is foolish and never worked.

*The notebooks are way cool, and the dry erase markers work perfectly. There is also a little foam piece on the edge of the notebook so it stays open slightly when it's closed to prevent smearing of the ink. Unlike some other dry erase games I own, the boards actually clean up completely after the game and don't leave little black speckles everywhere.

*We still don't know when to stop moving pieces, and actually try to win. Our first game we learned 3 pieces each and went for it, but that turned out badly. Our second game we narrowed down at least half of them and because I went for it first I ended up winning.

*Like chess, some pieces are more valuable than others and trading a weak movement piece for a strong movement piece is desirable. We're still working out how to score them. We thought the piece that moves forward only was very weak initially, but I won with it the second game. Being the only piece that moves 4 spaces, it's dangerously fast when properly defended.

I do like this game, but it's so different I feel very uncomfortable playing it, there's nothing to compare it to so strategies have to be made up from scratch.
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Cameron Chien
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Cupcakus wrote:
When you figure out exactly what piece something is, you are inclined to draw a vertical line through every other piece with that movement, but if your double agent is still around, you don't actually know that for sure.

When I think I have a piece nailed for sure, logic follows that all the other pieces couldn't be that one...unless of course, you have been fooled by the double agent.

That's why my notation notes where the clue came from. Did I eliminate that as a possibility through movement, or because I figured out another piece?

That way, if the double agent is found out later on, I know which pieces are affected by the sudden "hole" in my notes.

Cameron
 
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Stephen Buonocore
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Cupcakus wrote:
I do like this game, but it's so different I feel very uncomfortable playing it, there's nothing to compare it to so strategies have to be made up from scratch.


And this is certainly one of the many reasons to love this great game, in our opinion. It is truly unique. Robert Abbott's genius really shines through in this, his Magnum Opus.

As for how to develop strategy, here is a small article that we wrote with regard to the evolution of strategy in Confusion: Espionage and Deception in the Cold War:

http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/669218/the-evolution-of-stra...

Thanks,
Stephen M. Buonocore
Stronghold Games LLC
www.strongholdgames.com
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