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Subject: In Defense of the National Mah Jong League Game. rss

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Mark Paul
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I look at a Mah Jong set like at pack of playing cards, there are many ways to play. Several variants of this ancient game are being looked at now. I have played the Japanese Rules (Both with and without the Richu option) and the Hong Kong and Wright-Patterson game. I like them all. I also am fond of the game of the National Mah Jong League which issues a cards of scoring hands each year.

MAIN DIFFERENCES IN NMJL GAME:

1. There is a "Charleston" or passing of three tiles to the left, right and Across before the start of taking and discarding tiles. If all agree, a second Charleston can also be done. This is similar to the passing of three cards in the game of hearts.

2. There are Jokers in this game. Having the number the joker stands for can allow you to grab the joker from an exposed set on the table.

3. In the Oriental game there were special hands that were rewarded heavily for going out with, in the game you can only go out with the list of hands concealed or exposed and there is a set scoring.

4. Due to the jokers, not only chows and pungs are allowed, there is a set of 5 of a kind called a "Quint" which can be played.

Some say this game is too different from the original oriental style and isn't as open as the oriental game.

I have to say that the rummy flavor of Mah Jong remains in this game. The standard hands are grouped by types, after after a little play you rarely find yourself focused on the scoring card, you are playing the game just like the oriental version. In the "Board Game With Scott" video it made it sound like you were focused mostly on the scoring card, that isn't my experience.

The Charleston, the Jokers and the excitement which builds as you try to make your hand is a blast. I will play any type of Mah Jong, but I always get the cards for the new year from the National Mah Jong League.

Give it a try.

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K. David Ladage
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I am not sure if this can be considered a 'review' technically. Perhaps this should be in the General forums.
 
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Mark Paul
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I simply needed to give a brief description of the difference in the NMJL game from the oriental games and to advocate for a form of playing this game that I feel has not been given its due by BGG members.
 
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K. David Ladage
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Sure.

But upon reading this I still do not understand Mah Jong... I want to learn more about it; perhaps even learn to play it. So perhaps this is just not the review I was looking for.

Thanks anyway!
 
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Bryan Jensen
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games56 wrote:
I simply needed to give a brief description of the difference in the NMJL game from the oriental games and to advocate for a form of playing this game that I feel has not been given its due by BGG members.


No qualms if the American style is your thing. Yet I have given American style it's due. My revulsion for the style and for the NMJL cabal is not out of ignorance.
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Mark Paul
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As long as you have given it a try, I can't expect anything else. I find myslef playing Zung Jung more than the NMJL game, but I like the NMJL game, I think more Mah Jong players should at least do what you have done, give it a shot.
 
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