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Subject: CGF / GTR - October 2004 to June 2007 rss

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Ed Carter
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AS CO-DESIGNER OF GLORY TO ROME
it is with deep regret that I have requested that Cambridge Games Factory as our lawfully appointed international licensing agent act vigorously on behalf of Carl Chudyk and myself to defend our shared ownership and income from this game including the theoretically "new" game by Carl Chudyk called Uchronia.

You can find details HERE of exactly how and why we (CGF and myself) are acting in this matter.

However the story that links myself and Carl, Cambridge Games Factory and Glory To Rome is more involved that a two page press release.

I have provisionally split the story into three sections covering roughly the following time periods:

1) October 2004 to June 2007 (below)
2) June 2007 to March 2010
3) April 2010 to present

I don’t promise that the third section will be released - it may be inappropriate if (as we are hoping) IELLO move quickly to make good their missteps.

As context, IELLO has suggested on the French board game site, TricTrac that CGF may not have the right to assign international licenses for Glory To Rome:
Patrice from IELLO wrote:

"Est-ce que CGF dispose toujours des droits à exploiter GTR ? Ca c'est une bonne question !"

http://www.trictrac.net/jeux/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1409019

The reason why I and Cambridge Games Factory have been provoked into such a vehement and public response to Uchronia is precisely because our business partners were confronted with public rumors like this one, and requested that we take action to defend their reputations, as well as ours.

The tragedy here is that IELLO seems to have lacked the faith in Carl’s demonstrated brilliance as a games designer (e.g. Innovation) and failed to keep their commitment to Carl to publish and market Uchronia as a truly "new" game by Carl Chudyk rather than a derivative of Glory To Rome.

Sincerely,

Ed Carter
Co-Designer
Glory To Rome
The SERIOUSLY strategic strategy card game


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

CASTLES IN THE AIR

Henry David Thoreau wrote:
If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

Glory to Rome started as an argument.

When Erek Slater first showed him San Juan, Carl Chudyk was extremely unimpressed, claiming that it was hardly even a game.

Erek defended San Juan as simple, fun and playable; Carl disagreed strongly, and to back up his argument he put together a prototype (which he called "Be") to show the kind of mechanics he would use if he were to design a similar role based resource management game.

Cambridge Games Factory started as a discussion.

At about the same time (late 2004) Carl and I talked late into the night at the MIT Strategic Games Society about the challenges for new designers like Carl to get their first prototypes into print.

Over the next few weeks we talked further and came up with a loose business plan. We were both games designers. Carl agreed to own day to day game assembly, shipping and marketing while I agreed to provide business leadership and financing. We would "split the profits" 50/50, with the intention that this would be a career for Carl and a hobby for me.

Carl showed me - his intended business partner - "Be" in its first, roughest form. We cleaned it up, finding and integrating the theme, streamlining the mechanics, defining and tuning card powers, crafting a game. Together.

"Be" became Glory To Rome.

A few years later Carl admitted to me that actually he now thought San Juan was pretty OK, after all.

I don’t know if he ever told Erek.

RUMORS

There have been rumors of a dispute between myself and Carl Chudyk for a long time.

Well... I guess they are not rumors anymore.

I recognize that I do finally need to tell this story, but before I do want to thank the various Cambridge / MIT gamers (along with Carl, himself) for their discretion on this issue over the years.

One person in particular deserves some serious recognition here. I know you’d prefer not to be mentioned by name, so I won’t... you know who you are and I am immensely grateful for both what you have done, and what you have not done over the past few years.

In many ways my entire relationship with Carl has been one long dispute, but when Sophie Gravel from Filiosofia asked me two weeks ago whether Carl and I were in conflict my initial reaction was "I don’t think so, let me check".

I really thought that we had worked out our differences since our last heated discussion in April 2010. Particularly, I believed we were in agreement about IELLO ensuring [thing=73421]Uchronia[/thing] would not infringe on Glory To Rome. If Carl’s understanding was different, it certainly did not come across in the thank you emails for his royalty checks.

Honestly, I didn’t think we had much left to argue about. He and I designed and published a set of games together for two completely different reasons, but we are both well on our way to achieving our dreams - Carl is an increasingly respected games designer, I am running an up and coming games company.

But I’m getting ahead of myself...

CAMBRIDGE GAMES FACTORY

This story neither started nor ended on March 1st, 2006 but it is very much centered there. It’s probably better if I let Carl tell it to you in his own words.

Carl Chudyk wrote:
From: Carl Chudyk
Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 11:06 PM
To: ed.carter@cambridgegames.com
Subject: turning point in life

Hi Ed,

I will not be joining you this weekend.

I have reached the point in my life when I cannot afford any time to work on games. My future is as an editor, and in settling down. I appreciate the chance you've given me to enter the big world of gaming; however I've decided this isn't what I want to be doing in my spare time for the forseeable future.

I'm placing any and all games of mine besides those already printed by CGF on hold for the indefinite future. Maybe in the years ahead if I have a change of heart and want to work with games again, if you are still running CGF, we can work together again.

At some point soon you should incorporate; I am not interested in any share of the company. Let me know what I need to sign or what else I need to do.

-Carl

Cambridge Games Factory is not my first games company or even my first games company founded in Cambridge.

In 1992 in Cambridge, England I launched Blaze of Glory to publish my first game (Kersplatt!, designed with Dave Prince) and then spent two years working as a part-time cook in a pub while discovering how little I knew about Sales and Marketing. I had made every mistake possible (even the name - in real English "bog" is a slang word for toilet) before eventually recognizing that I just didn’t have the experience to set up and run the kind of company I had imagined.

Many designers try this "All hope, no knowledge" approach to launching a games company and a few succeed. Most, like me, do not.

In Fall 2004, when I first met Carl, I had ten years of retailing experience and was thinking increasingly seriously about setting up a new business - although I really didn’t see how that could be another games company. As a successful international consultant I knew that I simply could not invest the kind of day to day "drudge" time on assembling games, filling orders, attending conventions, etc. in order to launch without a $100K+ upfront investment.

Carl was an MIT graduate, dreaming of becoming a professional games designer while living with his parents and working as a part-time foot messenger. He had a score of impressive prototypes under his bed that he’d been working on over the previous four years, but was not sure how to find a publisher for them.

These game ideas were excellent - I played most of them over the next two years - but what really got me thinking was realizing that if we started a business together, he would be able to quickly join as a full-time paid employee as the business got off the ground. I approached Carl with the suggestion, and he readily agreed to the plan - entirely willing to own day to day game assembly, shipping and marketing.

We had a company!

Erek Slater joined our team a few months later and pushed on by his limitless energy, enthusiasm and organizing skills we seriously got to work. This was not a trick; it was a plan. Carl was entirely signed up for my proposal and, initially, was solidly committed to both developing great games and building the brand of our company. Together.

In September 2005 we printed our first games and the company quickly started to take off. We got great reviews for both Glory To Rome and Sneeze and were starting to build some regional awareness in New England. We had made an aggressive plan and we were achieving it.

However, in the year we had worked on launching the company Carl’s job situation had improved dramatically. He was now working as an editor with frequent long hours - so had far less time for CGF than we had originally expected. As the daily grind of assembly, shipping orders, attending local conventions and games clubs, promoting on BoardGameGeek, etc. started to kick in Carl found that this "drudge" work that he had willingly agreed to a year before when he was working part-time was a lot tougher to keep up with now that his real career was starting to take off.

In December 2005, about three months after we launched, Carl asked to switch to a Freelancer role, leaving me entirely responsible for the basic administrative and assembly work he had originally signed up for.

Carl Chudyk wrote:
From: Carl Chudyk
Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2005 1:45 PM
To: Ed Carter
Subject: RE: boardgamegeek

Hi Ed,

I'm not comfortable with the current relationship. Let's map out how to transfer me to a games designer role, that is if you want to continue working with me at all. I don't have the time you need in a full partner while working a full-time job that requires me to work late some nights, and even if I did, I don't plan on being single until after I'm 40 years old.

I'm certainly not comfortable knowing that if you decide to default on your house, I owe money for half of it, as I understand our agreement.*

You have not made it clear that you were staking your career on CGF, in fact, in previous discussion in Groton about this you had said this was what you had decided to do this year, and in the future, who knows, etc.

-Carl

*In fact, Carl was never at risk for my personal liabilities, nor would I ever want him to be - I clarified this the same day

This was absolutely not what I had agreed to when we decided to launch the company. The whole point had been the complimentary dreams - and our joint willingness to work to achieve those dreams. However much I had wanted to launch a games company again, I knew it was foolish without having someone on the team committed to doing the day to day work.

I should have walked away.

Carl’s resignation left me stuck with a company with some pretty good games, a certain amount of buzz, a brand I liked and which I had just invested a year of my life into bringing into reality. I guess if I’d thought properly about it I would have realized how much I’d be risking by trying to continue the company after Carl walked out on me, but I’ve never been much good at giving up on stuff.

The next few years were tough. I spent a couple of evenings a week and many weekends either assembling games in the factory or attending games clubs and conventions. My wife, Aurelia and I had ended up having less and less time to spend together and I only visited my family in the UK a couple of times in six years. Cash was extremely tight as endless expected and unexpected expenses ate into the tiny profit margins we had on these short runs. When things got busy I’d end up taking time off work to complete and ship orders - for a fraction of the income I’d lost from not working my day job.

I’m thankful however that through these incredibly tough times, I was never quite alone.

Carl was still around for game design although he rarely attended conventions and then disappeared completely in May 2007, shortly before Glory To Rome I.V was published.

Aurelia was there too, and was more supportive than anyone could reasonably expect. Between my career and the games company, I let myself lose touch with how important we used to be to each other. Sorry.

Eric Nielsen took over Game Development Director after Carl quit and he, along with Ann Murphy and Kris MacKormack were incredible playtesters / developers for the I.V edition. Eric, in particular, is probably still one of the best Glory To Rome players in the world (consistently beating both me and Carl) so was able to give excellent insights into over/under strength card powers for us to correct second time around.

Bryan Johnson, designer of Huang Di, helped out as Marketing Manager in early 2007, including demonstrating our games at the Gathering of Friends that year.

Rob Seater took over from Eric as Game Development Director in Summer 2007 - since then his prolific and incredible game development expertise has been the making of the company. Glory To Rome I.V was just going to press so I specifically asked Rob to not make any changes to the game - we’d just spent a year tuning it and getting ready to publish - however he quickly spotted the weakness in the current 3 card petition rule and created a set of widely known MIT Secret House Rules which are the basis for many of the international editions being published.

Kostas Zavros attended several major conventions for us - helping us to continue building awareness of both the company and our games in the New England area.

Jennifer Silverman was our first intern, and a gifted illustrator and graphic designer who started to raise the bar on the look of our games, and she provided some of the first ‘real’ artwork for our games, along with Kwanchai Moriya and Mark Campo.

Wake stepped in at the moment that I absolutely most needed him, and helped turn the company around with an unparalleled level of dedication and patience. I dream, Wake does - together we can be an incredible team, although at times I was an arrogant, ungrateful wretch in ways that perhaps only a kid brother can be. I’m truly sorry. Glory To Wake!

Christopher Rao and Jeremiah Lee followed the reverse route to Carl, starting out as designers but now becoming active members of the CGF management team.

Marjorie Silverman (Jenn’s sister) turned out to be a superbly competent, Chinese speaking import / export specialist, and after repeatedly navigating our games from Shanghai to Boston effortlessly systemized our factory processes after I then Wake had struggled to manage them from China and the UK, respectively.

Fox, Rebecca, Mark, Richard, Ed O, Adam, Rob T, Jason, Amber, H, Cassandra, Jeremy, Tam all helped out in different capacities, providing much needed support to keep Cambridge Games Factory moving.

Over the years the team grew and changed, gradually shaping into the company that exists today. I have many, many people to thank for their helping to complete the half decade of "drudge" work that created the "instant" success of both Glory To Rome and Cambridge Games Factory - however apart from the few months effort he put in before quitting at the start of 2006, Carl is not one of them.

GLORY TO ROME

While the original concept and rough mechanics for Glory To Rome certainly came from Carl, the game design was a shared project between myself and Carl from its inception. He and I had spent many intense and painful months battling through the design of every aspect of the game.

For example, these are the roles, largely as Carl originally defined them.



For reference, these roles are sorted in rank order, so HARVESTER and SOLIDER are rank one, RECRUITER and ARCHITECT are rank two, TREASURER and BUILDER are rank three.

Notice that the two starting influence was added onto the card afterwards - at my suggestion - to soften the game start. In Carl’s original mechanics you began with zero influence and so couldn’t hire your first client until you got your first building completed, making for a boring few turns and also creating an unacceptable runaway leader issue.

But also notice that Carl’s list was very abstracted - nothing here relates the game to Rome. I got to work.

Rome is hardly a farming community - HARVESTER became LABORER. SOLDIER to LEGIONARY was also obvious. Card rank should align with the social status so I switched around ARCHITECT and BUILDER. Later I switched BUILDER to CRAFTSMAN as a quiet homage to Puerto Rico / San Juan. Which left RECRUITER and TREASURER.

When thinking about theme, my first question is generally "What are we doing here?" Gathering a team to help rebuild Rome felt like the Patron / Client relationship I’d learnt about in Latin class, so I decided to put that social custom right at the heart of the game. CITIZENS became CLIENTS and PATRON temporarily replaced the TREASURER role with PATRON.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patronus

But while Carl was happy, I wasn’t. Selling materials for personal gain was really MERCHANT. The role that I absolutely wanted for PATRON was clearly RECRUITER, but that was a rank two role. Carl didn’t have concerns about linking the pinnacle role is Roman society to a middle rank material, but I did.

So... we fought.

Neither Carl nor I would compromise our design principles, so our struggle ended up finding a solution that met both of our constraints. To accommodate my theme switch of ARCHITECT with PATRON Carl also had us switch LEGIONARY and CRAFTSMAN. ARCHITECT is harder to play than CRAFTSMAN so the two roles need to be on different ranks to create the right dynamic between materials, buildings, clients, etc.

You see, Carl and I have incredibly different design philosophies; I focus on making a game work thematically, emotionally and strategically; Carl tends to think about games more intellectually and tactically. I care intensely about both theme integration and making sure a game is fun for both new players and players in weak positions; Carl is a lifetime Magic: The Gathering player and loved adding wonderful insane broken powers to the game, sometimes under-valuing simpler functions that supported interesting play strategies.

For example, early in our design process Carl recommended cutting the Temple (+4 Hand Size) in favor of a more exotic card power. Erek initially supported Carl’s position, but I fought hard and successfully defended its place in the game. While not exciting by itself, Temple supports many strong card combinations (e.g., Palace, Ampitheater), and is devastating with a heavy Craftsman strategy.

This, I believe, is why Glory To Rome has a softer, more forgiving feel than Innovation which Carl designed on his own - GTR was constructed by me to meet my constraints, as well as by Carl to meet his.

DESIGNING TOGETHER

I wonder, sometimes, why Carl never really recognized the contribution I gave into the Glory To Rome design process. The best explanation I can come up with is that he remembers the fights and he remembers the brilliant fixes but has lost track of the relationship between the two.

There were many "instant" ideas that came up in our design discussions (like adding two starting influence in Glory To Rome, or changing the Organic Soup victory condition into a straight race to complete an Amino Acid, or adding event cards in Sneeze) where my memory is that I made a suggestion and Carl said "Wow, that’s great," and wrote it down. I suppose Carl may now consider these as simply play-testing feedback but for me this was an interactive design process.

I can’t imagine that Carl disputes that I was the one who named the roles and forced them to be rearranged to match the story space, even as he protected their connection to the mechanics. He may, however, have forgotten that I theme checked every building, changing and rearranging them to match first century Rome (e.g., downgrading the Senate from Marble to Concrete to match the Curia Julia). I, personally, believe that this deep theme integration was integral to the success of Glory To Rome (this game is clearly not "Glory To Paris"), but it certainly wasn’t the limit of my design influence.

For the two and a half years we worked closely together, a pattern that Carl and I followed repeatedly was for Carl to spend an incredible amount of energy arguing that my concern was irrelevant. Only when I had finally convinced him that the issue needed fixing would he switch to engaging in solving the problem, at which point we would solve it almost immediately. This process was certainly far more painful than it should have been, perhaps because while I took the time to understand and integrate with Carl’s design approach, I don’t think he ever really understood mine.

"Petition" (play three cards of the same color as a JACK) was a big victory for me:

Carl Chudyk wrote:
From: Carl Chudyk
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006
To: ed.carter@cambridgegames.com
Subject: RE: Quick Thoughts...

Hi Ed,

I'm planning to be at SGS tomorrow and I'd love to try Splat with you even two-player.

As far as GTR, my opinion is still that the problem is not big enough to warrant the damage of adding rules to fix it.

-Carl

Ed Carter wrote:
From: "Ed Carter"
To: "'Carl Chudyk'"
Subject: RE: Quick Thoughts...
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2006

Sorry about the last e-mail---long day.

Now that I’m aware of the local minima issue I’ll point it out to you when it comes up - it’ll make much more sense discussing it based on concrete examples. One consideration to think about - even if it’s possible to avoid the issue by ‘playing better’ that still means it’s hitting inexperienced players, which is not good by "The most important time anyone plays a game is the first time".

I tried the new Splat! distribution with Aurelia last night and it seemed to work (although Aurelia wasn’t really playing) - I’m looking forward to seeing how it goes with 5-7 players tomorrow.

Cheers,


Ed

Carl Chudyk wrote:
From: Carl Chudyk
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006
To: ed.carter@cambridgegames.com
Subject: RE: Quick Thoughts...

Blah.

Well sorry about mine too. I'm not disagreeing with your principles which are good I'm just saying I think its a bad call in this particular situation. Everything you're saying is right in general, its just in the specific here its not worth the downsides and it takes away from why GTR is what it is.

Blah.

Ed Carter wrote:
From: Ed Carter
Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2006 9:24 PM
To: CGF_team@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [CGF_team] Glory To Rome -- New Player Card Management

Ok-so I love Assassination because of the strategic options it opens up, but as Eric points out it’s a ‘secret’ rule which means it probably won’t solve the actual issue we seem to be having (inexperienced players ending up in an ‘unfun’ corner position where their hand is full of cards they can’t play).

Carl and I discussed another possibility yesterday:

Any player can play three order cards of the same color as a JACK.

Basically this is just a weaker version of the Circus power. It took a while, but I’ve also found a color fit for the mechanic : "Petition"

From the time of Augustus, it was in the Circus (as well as in the theater and Colosseum) that the populus could make its opinions known and petition for redress. [...]

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_romana/cir...

It may seem like a small change, but - to me, at least - an incredibly important one. After teaching the game repeatedly at conventions I saw a pattern where new players would frequently get stuck with a hand full of cards they couldn’t work out how to play, leading to a tedious game position where they only ever drew one or two cards at once. A new player who does not enjoy their first game is unlikely to want to play a second time - this needed to be fixed.

Once I had convinced Carl that there was a problem, the two of us were able to quickly brainstorm a mechanism to fix it and Petition quickly entered the game. Note, though, that while Carl and I brainstormed and tested the mechanic together - the thematic research and function name came entirely from me.

Carl and I designed Glory To Rome together.

I put it in Rome.

CREATIVE CONFLICT

In retrospect, Carl never really wanted a co-designer.

Certainly, he and I could have done more to clarify our relationship up front.

At the same time, I really thought it was clear what was going on. Dave Prince and I designed and developed Kersplatt! together, as a team, in very much the same way that Carl, Erek and I had been working on Glory To Rome and our other games - while the original concept for Kersplatt! had certainly been mine it was always clear that Dave and I would share design credit for the game.

I suspect that Carl, when he looks back, simply remembers his unique contribution to the game more than those from myself and the rest of the team. So, for example, he was certainly involved in coming up with the "Petition" rule but his actions over the years suggest that he considers mechanics like this one entirely his design, even though I identified the underlying player dynamic issues that we needed to fix, convinced him of its importance, brainstormed the solution and then researched Roman culture until I could find a story hook to put it clearly into Nero’s Rome.

The first time I realized Carl and I had a problem was in August 2005. We were getting ready for final printing and Carl put together a document outlining cover content for our first releases and his proposal assigned him sole cover credit for the three games from his original concepts while assigning me sole cover credit for Splat! - the revised version of Kersplatt! we had been working on.

In Carl’s draft, Erek, despite working with us faithfully for about six months, received no credit at all.

Carl and I then had a tough conversation. I felt that the three of us had been working as a team and believed the cover credits should reflect that. Carl agreed to this. However Carl feels today, he understood and agreed in August 2005 that Glory To Rome was a shared project.

Carl did want to be credited for the original concept (which I was fine with) so we ended up assigning credit in the following roles:

Concept - Carl Chudyk
Story Line - Ed Carter (Reflecting my primary design focus on theme integration and tuning)
Design - Carl Chudyk, Erek Slater (Since for the initial edition I’d been focusing on graphic design while Carl and Erek had been doing most of the specific playtesting and tuning of the different building powers - I was much more involved in this for the I.V edition.)

To a large extent that first conversation is the one that counted - the rest is simply history.

Carl may have been stewing on a perceived injustice for all these years. I’m not sure. It is certainly true that back in August 2005 he initially wanted to be seen as the sole designer of Glory to Rome - however when confronted with the facts he accepted the reality that he was not.

Shortly afterwards Erek moved to Chicago, dropping out of both the company and the design process.

The next month Carl and I signed our general partnership agreement. We each now had a 50 / 50 stake in both Cambridge Games Factory as a business and the games we were designing and publishing together. Carl and I had been a joint design team from the very beginning and, in signing this document, Carl was also getting 50% of the business itself. By then I’d already spent almost a year planning and building the business strategy and brand, most of which is still reflected in what you see from Cambridge Games Factory today.

We had some ups and downs, but after Carl’s decision to switch to a Designer / Publisher relationship the company ran relatively smoothly for a while - we were still operating under the original general partnership agreement, but with the understanding that we would shift to a new version at some point. We’d had some general discussions about what the equity split might look like but had not made any final agreements.

We seemed on track until March 1st, 2006 when Carl sent the "Turning Point in Life" email that I started this story with:

Carl Chudyk wrote:
From: Carl Chudyk
Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 11:06 PM
To: edcarter@cambridgegames.com
Subject: turning point in life

Hi Ed,

I will not be joining you this weekend.

I have reached the point in my life when I cannot afford any time to work on games. My future is as an editor, and in settling down. I appreciate the chance you've given me to enter the big world of gaming; however I've decided this isn't what I want to be doing in my spare time for the forseeable future.

I'm placing any and all games of mine besides those already printed by CGF on hold for the indefinite future. Maybe in the years ahead if I have a change of heart and want to work with games again, if you are still running CGF, we can work together again.

At some point soon you should incorporate; I am not interested in any share of the company. Let me know what I need to sign or what else I need to do.

-Carl

Carl and I talked, and I quickly got him re-energized about game design - to the point that a week later he sent me an email asking why I wasn’t answering his suggestions quickly enough. We had just started a minor review of game rules / card powers which seemed to be exploding (this process would become GTR I.V) and with his renewed enthusiasm Carl committed to playtest the game at an upcoming convention.

However, I was getting worried.

Carl had been getting into a habit of cancelling meetings and public engagements with little notice and no explanation. Beyond the simple disruption to the rest of the team, this pattern was also forcing me to consider the risk to Cambridge Games Factory and Glory To Rome if Carl suddenly disappeared completely.

A few days before the convention he had scheduled to attend, I received this bafflingly blunt email:

Carl Chudyk wrote:
From: Carl Chudyk
Sent: Tuesday, April 04, 2006
To: ed.carter@cambridgegames.com
Subject: cancelling Saturday

Hi Ed,

I'm not interested in coming on Saturday. Sorry.

-Carl

Finally, I had had enough.

Whenever Carl was around and engaged his ideas and energy were first rate. But it was time, finally, to formally break up our CGF partnership. A few weeks later we signed agreements formalizing Carl’s departure from CGF, our relationship as co-designers of Glory To Rome and our decision to have CGF publish our games.

We worked together for another year preparing the successful release of I.V:



As I had feared, by the time I.V went to press in late 2007 Carl had indeed disappeared completely.

I haven’t seen him since.
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Suddenly a shot rang out! A door slammed. The maid screamed. Suddenly a pirate ship appeared on the horizon! While millions of people were starving, the king lived in luxury. Meanwhile, on a small farm in Kansas, a boy was growing up.
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Moral of the story: Other people are not you. They do not have the same goals, preferences, interests, or priorities.

This seems to have been the center of your business arrangement to begin with, and understandably also the end of it.
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Ed Carter
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NateStraight wrote:
Other people are not you. They do not have the same goals, preferences, interests, or priorities.


Very true, although in some ways I got caught out here because in the end Carl was like me (losing interest in Games design to go do other things instead, just as I did in 1994) while I really thought when I met him that Carl was truly "long haul" committed to both games design and our shared business venture.
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