Recommend
4 
 Thumb up
 Hide
6 Posts

A Few Acres of Snow» Forums » Rules

Subject: Launching raids from "controlled" locations... rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Tony Hamen
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Music sucks now....
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just to be absolutely clear, can you launch a raid from anywhere you have a piece on the board, or only those locations that trace back to your home city?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thierry Aradan
France
ASSAS
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
IMO you don't have to trace back to Quebec or Boston, and there is nothing in the rules mentioning that supply is needed for raids.
Raids are small affairs perpetrated by a few auxiliaries.
Only contingent of regular troops need supply.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alan Paull
United Kingdom
HUNTINGDON
Cambridgeshire
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
gentlegiantglass wrote:
Just to be absolutely clear, can you launch a raid from anywhere you have a piece on the board, or only those locations that trace back to your home city?


Raiding does not require a location card, merely control. You still control a cut-off location if you have a piece in it. So you can raid from a cut-off location
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan Moore
United States
San Francisco
California
flag msg tools
mbmb
Alan Paull wrote:
gentlegiantglass wrote:
Just to be absolutely clear, can you launch a raid from anywhere you have a piece on the board, or only those locations that trace back to your home city?


Raiding does not require a location card, merely control. You still control a cut-off location if you have a piece in it. So you can raid from a cut-off location


I see the logic of this. You control a cut off city, sure. You can't use the location card but you don't lose a siege in a cut off location, even though you can't reinforce it. So sure, launch a raid, you still control it!

But I think it wouldn't be so. The scale of the game is large and abstracts many things. Indian raids aren't just about moving forces. There is politics involved and I suspect that a cut off location would represent a loss of face to local tribes that would keep them from helping you.

And on pure game terms, raids are already powerful. I'd be pretty bummed to think that I couldn't stop raids even after going to the trouble of isolating X number of towns.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jimmy Okolica
United States
Washington Township
Ohio
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
catmando wrote:
Alan Paull wrote:
gentlegiantglass wrote:
Just to be absolutely clear, can you launch a raid from anywhere you have a piece on the board, or only those locations that trace back to your home city?


Raiding does not require a location card, merely control. You still control a cut-off location if you have a piece in it. So you can raid from a cut-off location


I see the logic of this. You control a cut off city, sure. You can't use the location card but you don't lose a siege in a cut off location, even though you can't reinforce it. So sure, launch a raid, you still control it!

But I think it wouldn't be so. The scale of the game is large and abstracts many things. Indian raids aren't just about moving forces. There is politics involved and I suspect that a cut off location would represent a loss of face to local tribes that would keep them from helping you.

And on pure game terms, raids are already powerful. I'd be pretty bummed to think that I couldn't stop raids even after going to the trouble of isolating X number of towns.


But thematically, I'd think cut-off locations would be even more likely to raid. They need food and supplies from somewhere. If they're cut off from their supply, they'll be more likely to find what they need somewhere close.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan Moore
United States
San Francisco
California
flag msg tools
mbmb
Butterfly0038 wrote:
catmando wrote:
Alan Paull wrote:
gentlegiantglass wrote:
Just to be absolutely clear, can you launch a raid from anywhere you have a piece on the board, or only those locations that trace back to your home city?


Raiding does not require a location card, merely control. You still control a cut-off location if you have a piece in it. So you can raid from a cut-off location


I see the logic of this. You control a cut off city, sure. You can't use the location card but you don't lose a siege in a cut off location, even though you can't reinforce it. So sure, launch a raid, you still control it!

But I think it wouldn't be so. The scale of the game is large and abstracts many things. Indian raids aren't just about moving forces. There is politics involved and I suspect that a cut off location would represent a loss of face to local tribes that would keep them from helping you.

And on pure game terms, raids are already powerful. I'd be pretty bummed to think that I couldn't stop raids even after going to the trouble of isolating X number of towns.


But thematically, I'd think cut-off locations would be even more likely to raid. They need food and supplies from somewhere. If they're cut off from their supply, they'll be more likely to find what they need somewhere close.


It's question of scale and abstraction. The game covers long stretches of time over large distances. Indian raids aren't actually departing from location X. They are being bribed to assist you, is why you pay per use. Holding the card represents treaty alliances. The Indian Leaders and Priests are the means of influencing these alliances. The French have a partisan Indian card and two Priests vs the single British Indian Leader because the French had less designs on Indian land.*

None of that necessarily influences the ability of town to serve as point from which to launch a raid. I could be all wrong about this. In fact I can offer a counter argument: the best card the Indians had, historically, was playing one side against another. Shifting the balance back in favor of the side who's lost territory wouldn't be a bad idea.

I still don't like it, though.

*another example of game abstraction is Ambushes. Where are these taking place? Somewhere! Which tribe did the ambushing, exactly? I dunno . . . Where do those troops stay, anyway?

And sieges! The only way in real life to defeat a siege, generally, is to wait for the besigers to starve, get sick, die, mutiny, and/or give up. Outside forces had to be large enough to surround the besieging army, cut off thier supply, or tempt them out in battle and defeat them. This game simply pitches forces in until one side cracks, without D6 rolls or anything.

I'm considering a tongue-in-cheek re-writing of the rules that would show just how much longer and more complicated the game would be as a more traditional war game.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.