Scott G

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I'm mid-design with a game, and I'm continually going between makeing the game more light-weight and more medium-weight.

I'll work out some prototype.. roll some dice and move some bits.. and think to add something.
As I work with that... I'll begin to think something is too much, and start to remove some elements

Back and forth the process goes.. molding the game into something real (hopefully). ANd I believe it's a good thing / healthy process at this stage.

However, I've notice that part of my feeling to move "toward lighter" is I worry about the production.
Maybe not so much in the "dream-scenario" where it's published... but more

"How will this prototype?"
"Quite a log of bits to work with."
"That's a lot of cards to print."
"That's a lot of different types of tokens to have."
"If I have to go PnP for playtesting, is this too much to produce?"

Part of me believes that I should just design "in a box".. and not worry too much about how things will be made or how many components there are in the game.

I've been using zuntzu (as best as I can) to prototype, so I've never really had to print it all out yet.
An early version HAS been printed, but I've moved over to just digital changes since then.

While zuntzu is great for this... at some point... things will have to be printed to take the game to a game-day for "real play testing." And, I would expect to ask testers here to print things to play test themselves.

Any thoughts?

Have other designers thought about production during the game design phase?
Or just let the printers worry about the production? :-)
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Rich Shipley
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If you are designing a game for yourself, it doesn't it can have as many pieces as you are willing to make. If you intend to publish it, then components are obviously a factor.

You can pare a more complex game down and have plans to make expansions. It worked for Settlers. Either that or use the other ideas in other games.

Without more detail it is hard to be more specific.
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Ianthe Phagocyt
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A lot of time, a mathematically equivalent design can be made that use very different components. Keep that in mind, especially if your main concern is with the game's depth or the player's decision making process.
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Nate K
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Go with what the game needs, first. Then listen to feedback on whether the game requires "too much stuff" to make. No one will complain about the game having too few bits, but there's no way to know where the threshold is.
 
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