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Napoleon's Triumph» Forums » Rules

Subject: Moving back and forth along the road rss

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Allied announce an attack. French refuse combat and retreated. Allied move a cavalry into the locale and, announcing that he is using the road connecting the two locales, move the same cavalry back where it came from.

Is that legal?

My thoughts: The rules didn't prohibit this move but to me it is against the spirit of the rules (dare I say I know it) -- the attacker must be subjected to some form of obligations.

Is the ruling exploitable? I can't think of a way. All it does is create a great vacuum between the armies. A cavalry in the reserve could always retreat without penalty so why leave the locale empty? Perhaps to avoid encirclement? That would certainly make cavalries even more "nebulous".

One way of exploiting it: the cavalry maybe repositioned for probing a different direction during the next turn. Despite their speed, I'm not sure if cavalries then were able to withhold commitment so easily. Highly mobile cavalry harassments like these belongs to the Age of Alexander.

Your thoughts?
 
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Chris Montgomery
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AFAIK, that would be a legal move. The difference is, when the cavalry attacked the first time, the defender can choose to defend, especially if he knows he can beat the attacking cavalry. Most of the time in my games, cavalry attacks have been feints along a road, and so cannot move back to the locale they attacked from.

I think this is a valid tactic, but I haven't ever really seen it implemented, because I'm not sure I see a use for it in very many situations. Usually, the cavalry just scope out the enemy, and help you maneuver your corps into position.

Just my $0.02.

Cheers.
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Thanks for the input, Chris. The more I think of it, the more I feel this ruling isn't exploitable. The only thing I could come up with is when you want to be extremely defensive. But that would also mean your opponent is probably ultra offensive (It is 3:00pm and they are one star short) and would never refuse combat.

If you are right, it means no rule clarification needed (since anything not prohibited by the rules is allowed) -- always a good thing.
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Brian Evans
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I too think it's a legal move though I haven't really every considered it before. There are some niche situations where this could be useful I suppose, like when you want your cavalry to be in the original locale to act as a screening force (from an attack originating from a different direction). Most of the time I would prefer my cavalry to hold the attacked locale if for nothing else but to force my opponent to expend resources in pushing me out.


I could see where you might think this move would go against the spirit of the game though. But, I don't see anything stopping it. Perhaps someone else has a better take.
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Michael Cowles
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Having cleared the locale, even better if it is at a crossroads, I am now free to march a different troop in; to defend the counter-attack or be in a better position for further offense.
And leave my cavalry free to continue their herding exploits
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Garry Haggerty
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WalterLai wrote:
Allied announce an attack. French refuse combat and retreated. Allied move a cavalry into the locale and, announcing that he is using the road connecting the two locales, move the same cavalry back where it came from.

Is that legal?



Legal. See this thread:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/225576/one-way-road-move...
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Thanks, Garry. I did try googling for a clarification and restricting my search to BGG. Problem is, I used terms like "backwards", "zig zag", but not "one-way". My apologises for asking a solved problem!
 
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Was George Orwell an Optimist?
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WalterLai wrote:
My thoughts: The rules didn't prohibit this move but to me it is against the spirit of the rules (dare I say I know it) -- the attacker must be subjected to some form of obligations.

The attacker did burn two movement points along the road when he took that little joy ride.
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Nicklas Roman
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QuickBen wrote:
Having cleared the locale, even better if it is at a crossroads, I am now free to march a different troop in; to defend the counter-attack or be in a better position for further offense.
And leave my cavalry free to continue their herding exploits


Haven't played in a long time, but I'm pretty sure there is a restriction on who can enter a locale that has been used for road movement.
 
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Chris Montgomery
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I believe that restriction is a corps move by a corps of at least two divisions.
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