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Subject: What happens when a dog is played and your partner is already out? rss

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chris schott
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Lead would go to the person to the left (clockwise) of your partner.
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Mark McEvoy
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And if that player is also already out, the lead comes right back to yourself.
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spacerx wrote:
Lead would go to the person to the left (clockwise) of your partner.


I thought lead passed to the right... counter clockwise as the game is played, counter clockwise.

BOb
 
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Jeff Chunko
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pilotbob wrote:
spacerx wrote:
Lead would go to the person to the left (clockwise) of your partner.
I thought lead passed to the right... counter clockwise as the game is played, counter clockwise.


The lead passes to the next person who would normally play after the "out" player. But you'll find that no one actually plays Tichu counterclockwise, despite the "rule".
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Mark Waenink
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Jeff Chunko wrote:
pilotbob wrote:
spacerx wrote:
Lead would go to the person to the left (clockwise) of your partner.
I thought lead passed to the right... counter clockwise as the game is played, counter clockwise.


The lead passes to the next person who would normally play after the "out" player. But you'll find that no one actually plays Tichu counterclockwise, despite the "rule".


We do!
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Anthony Rubbo
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kanoe wrote:
Jeff Chunko wrote:
But you'll find that no one actually plays Tichu counterclockwise, despite the "rule".


We do!


I attribute this difference to the Coriolis effect.
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chris schott
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I didn't realize that the rule was to play counterclockwise. A rule that we intentionally do not observe is the one for players to take their own cards from the deck; we always deal them.
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Berthold Nüchter
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Jeff Chunko wrote:
The lead passes to the next person who would normally play after the "out" player. But you'll find that no one actually plays Tichu counterclockwise, despite the "rule".

No one? Sorry, you are wrong. We do. In general both directions are very common all over the world for all kind of card games.

from Wikipedia:
Quote:
Direction of play

The players of a card game normally form a circle around a table or other space that can hold cards. The game orientation or direction of play, which obviously is only relevant for three or more players, can be either clockwise or counter-clockwise. It is the direction in which various roles in the game proceed. Most regions have a traditional direction of play, such as:

Counter-clockwise in most of Asia and in South America.
Clockwise in North America and Australia.

Europe is roughly divided into a clockwise area in the north and a counter-clockwise area in the south. The boundary runs between France, Germany, Austria (mostly), the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine and Russia (clockwise) and Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, Italy, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Turkey (counter-clockwise).

Games that originate in a region with a strong preference are often initially played in the original direction, even in regions that prefer the opposite direction. For games that have official rules and are played in tournaments, the direction of play is often prescribed in those rules.
 
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Jeff Chunko wrote:
pilotbob wrote:
spacerx wrote:
Lead would go to the person to the left (clockwise) of your partner.
I thought lead passed to the right... counter clockwise as the game is played, counter clockwise.


The lead passes to the next person who would normally play after the "out" player. But you'll find that no one actually plays Tichu counterclockwise, despite the "rule".


Then you're playing incorrectly non-traditionally.

"The next player (to the right - the Chinese play to the right, like the Swiss and the Hopi)"
 
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Jeff Chunko
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Tichu isn't really played "all over the world". The vast majority of players are in North America, and the EU. Folks in Asia don't play Tichu, they play the original games it was inspired by.

The only people I've ever met who played with the counter clockwise rule (and the take your own cards dealing) were those who taught themselves.
And as soon as they start playing with others outside their group, they switch.

It would be interesting to see sales figures broken down by country though.
 
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Stuart Carroll
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FWIW, the iOS app plays clockwise I think..
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Berthold Nüchter
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Jeff Chunko wrote:
Tichu isn't really played "all over the world". The vast majority of players are in North America, and the EU. Folks in Asia don't play Tichu, they play the original games it was inspired by.

I said "In general both directions are very common all over the world for all kind of card games." I did not say that Tichu is played all over the world.
According to www.pagat.com chinese card games are usually played counter-clockwise and the players take their cards themselves. Tichu is inspired by Zheng Fen and closely related to it. So the designer kept these rules.
I think that it is better taking the cards than dealing them, because players have to check if they call a Grand Tichu during the distribution of the cards. The dealer would have to stop dealing, take his cards and think about this.

 
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Jeff Chunko
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Like I said, virtually no one plays tichu counter clockwise.

Deal 8 card in one pile, then 6 cards in another. Everyone picks up first the larger, then the smaller pile. No need to stop dealing.
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Jeff Chunko wrote:
Tichu isn't really played "all over the world". The vast majority of players are in North America, and the EU. Folks in Asia don't play Tichu, they play the original games it was inspired by.

The only people I've ever met who played with the counter clockwise rule (and the take your own cards dealing) were those who taught themselves.
And as soon as they start playing with others outside their group, they switch.

It would be interesting to see sales figures broken down by country though.


Too many absolutes...

This always mystified me - "I'm American! I can't handle playing counterclockwise because I've always played all card games clockwise. I get confused!" - of course, regionally speaking, clockwise is the preferred direction of play for us Americans.

There are many games of cards that go counterclockwise. I wonder if 'these people' simply refuse to play those games based on that fact.

That's not to say I would refuse a game based on Direction of Play; I might suggest CC because, if it is a tradition, even the simplest traditions in cards should be upheld, and since Direction of play is largely regional, I would not kick about it for the comfort of my co-gamers.

BUT, the rules do state counterclockwise, so that would be my preference.

"We thank Mr Chuang for everything"



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I guess my name is "no one".

BOb
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Jeff Chunko wrote:
Like I said, virtually no one plays tichu counter clockwise.


In the US, but as far as I'm aware, counter-clockwise is the norm in Germany for Tichu. Not that it matters one bit.
 
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Jeff Chunko
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Planetary wrote:
In the US, but as far as I'm aware, counter-clockwise is the norm in Germany for Tichu. Not that it matters one bit.


I find this claim interesting given that all the Germans I know, and the BSW implementation all play clockwise. Are you German? Where are you from/located?
 
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Jeff Chunko wrote:
Planetary wrote:
In the US, but as far as I'm aware, counter-clockwise is the norm in Germany for Tichu. Not that it matters one bit.


I find this claim interesting given that all the Germans I know, and the BSW implementation all play clockwise. Are you German? Where are you from/located?


1) You're from Ohio. Being "german" in Ohio is not being "in Germany".
2) How can you tell the BSW implementation is clockwise? Seems it could just as well be counterclockwise to me.
 
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Sean McCarthy
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markgravitygood wrote:

2) How can you tell the BSW implementation is clockwise? Seems it could just as well be counterclockwise to me.


From the passing screen. The player who goes after you is on the left.

I've played with someone who said the passing screen was wrong/confusing before, now I think I understand why!
 
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Jeff Chunko wrote:
Planetary wrote:
In the US, but as far as I'm aware, counter-clockwise is the norm in Germany for Tichu. Not that it matters one bit.


I find this claim interesting given that all the Germans I know, and the BSW implementation all play clockwise. Are you German? Where are you from/located?


I live in the area covered by the ATP, basically that's the area between Stuttgart and Bayreuth. They host the German Championships every year (http://www.tichu.tk/). I've never met anyone who didn't play counter-clockwise, but I probably shouldn't have generalized it like that. There sure are different preferences here when it comes to drawing vs dealing.

And yes, when you're used to counter-clockwise playing and left/right passing conventions, it can get confusing on BSW.

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Mark McEvoy
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pilotbob wrote:
spacerx wrote:
Lead would go to the person to the left (clockwise) of your partner.


I thought lead passed to the right... counter clockwise as the game is played, counter clockwise.

BOb


The question-asker specifically asked, and I quote, "If you're playing clockwise, who gets to go next?"

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Steve Blanding
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drxcm wrote:
FWIW, the iOS app plays clockwise I think..

Actually, the iOS app can play in either direction. You can specify your preference in the settings screen. It defaults to counterclockwise if you are playing in German and clockwise if you're playing in English, as those are the most common directions played by each speaker but you can change the setting to suit your preference. You can even choose to play counterclockwise against a linked opponent who is playing clockwise on his device. The game is smart enough to order the opponents correctly on each device.

Incidentally, the folks at FataMorgana also recognize that while the rules specify counterclockwise, most English speakers will probably be more comfortable playing clockwise. It really doesn't matter, so long as you adjust the "dog rule" accordingly.
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Jacco Versteeg
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Berthold wrote:
I think that it is better taking the cards than dealing them, because players have to check if they call a Grand Tichu during the distribution of the cards. The dealer would have to stop dealing, take his cards and think about this.


We do this when we play. After all, making a decision on calling Grand Tichu is usually made in seconds (at least, with the people I play with). So there's generally not a long waiting time anyway.
 
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Lee Fisher
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White Stone wrote:
Berthold wrote:
I think that it is better taking the cards than dealing them, because players have to check if they call a Grand Tichu during the distribution of the cards. The dealer would have to stop dealing, take his cards and think about this.


We do this when we play. After all, making a decision on calling Grand Tichu is usually made in seconds (at least, with the people I play with). So there's generally not a long waiting time anyway.


Jeff Chunko wrote:

Deal 8 card in one pile, then 6 cards in another. Everyone picks up first the larger, then the smaller pile. No need to stop dealing.


This.
 
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thatmarkguy wrote:
pilotbob wrote:
spacerx wrote:
Lead would go to the person to the left (clockwise) of your partner.


I thought lead passed to the right... counter clockwise as the game is played, counter clockwise.

BOb


The question-asker specifically asked, and I quote, "If you're playing clockwise, who gets to go next?"



modest opps... missed that little tidbit.

BOb
 
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