Ralph T
United States
Signal Hill
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Either have game designers go head to head in a timed-head to head competition to design a game with a common mechanic (the secret mechanic today is "dice!"), or have hobbyist game designers compete in series of elimination competitions where they get a job as a game designer at a major game company if they win.

It might work in Germany...
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Manchuwok
Canada
Mission
BC
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Competing in a series of rounds would be more fitting. Speed/pressure is not as much a part of game design as it is of cooking.

It would be a neat idea. I'd watch.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Aaron Morgan
United States
Sacramento
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
manchuwok wrote:
Competing in a series of rounds would be more fitting.


Agreed. Something more along the lines of Project Runway, with Fashion Week replaced by Essen.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Schenck
United States
Dayton
Ohio
flag msg tools
GO BUCKS!
badge
Stop touching me!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Would this be hosted by David Bromstad?
We could call it...


Command & Color Splash


2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Riddle
United States
Oxford
Michigan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I do not think hours of doodling and playtesting and math would make a good show. Maybe a Lion's Den type show where want-to-be designers pitch thier games to a panel from X game company would be cool
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James Sitz
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
"I haf in meine hand only three meeples, but four peoples in front of me. Vun of you vill be leafing the island of Catan, cubes in hand."

Yeah, this is a bad idea. Even in Germany I doubt anyone would watch anything.

Board game design is not visually stimulating enough to translate well to TV. If anything tangentially related to board games would make even an okay show, I think it'd be something more like America's Next Top Illustrator.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Schenck
United States
Dayton
Ohio
flag msg tools
GO BUCKS!
badge
Stop touching me!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Jexik wrote:
Yeah, this is a bad idea.

David Bromstad can make anything fabulous.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
If you're going to have a show about games, why not make it a game show where players compete in them for prizes? That sounds like a much more natural concept. You could even add some action by dividing the contest into two parts, the game itself and a preliminary round where players go around collecting power-ups and equipment that can be used in the game.

Say for example the preliminary round is a maze where you can find dungeon-crawl stuff like armour, weapons, potions, spells and so forth. Whatever items your "party" finds and hauls out to the exit provide corresponding cards for use in the subsequent game round.

EDIT: OT, but I wouldn't really consider Iron Chef a reality show. It's just a televised contest. This type of show pre-dates the whole "reality TV" thing. Furthermore, if a cooking contest is reality TV, then what about a baseball game?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Digger Cook
United States
Topeka
Kansas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think this would be a great show, but I don't know if it would work best as a real-time show like Iron Chef. There are many other popular design shows that compress the process into a shorter watchable time, like Junkyard Wars, Project Runway, Top Design, Monster Garage, etc.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ralph T
United States
Signal Hill
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Maybe the way to do the show is to do some sort of "Pimp My Ride," "Monster Garage" or Extreme Makeover Home edition. An amateur designer shows his game design to a world class designer, then the designer uses his team of specialists (including artists) to pimp the design into a ready-to-publish state.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Riddle
United States
Oxford
Michigan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Kiraboshi wrote:
If you're going to have a show about games, why not make it a game show where players compete in them for prizes? That sounds like a much more natural concept. You could even add some action by dividing the contest into two parts, the game itself and a preliminary round where players go around collecting power-ups and equipment that can be used in the game.

Say for example the preliminary round is a maze where you can find dungeon-crawl stuff like armour, weapons, potions, spells and so forth. Whatever items your "party" finds and hauls out to the exit provide corresponding cards for use in the subsequent game round.

EDIT: OT, but I wouldn't really consider Iron Chef a reality show. It's just a televised contest. This type of show pre-dates the whole "reality TV" thing. Furthermore, if a cooking contest is reality TV, then what about a baseball game?

Baseball is sports and infinitely better than reality tv. Many reality tv shows are just new dumb sports for people who don't like real sports. American idol / bachelor you are picking a team and hoping they win the contest
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Digger Cook
United States
Topeka
Kansas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
That would make a great show. I would keep the competitive part in there too, having a few designers at a time, and judging at the end.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ralph T
United States
Signal Hill
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
riddlen wrote:
Kiraboshi wrote:
If you're going to have a show about games, why not make it a game show where players compete in them for prizes? That sounds like a much more natural concept. You could even add some action by dividing the contest into two parts, the game itself and a preliminary round where players go around collecting power-ups and equipment that can be used in the game.

Say for example the preliminary round is a maze where you can find dungeon-crawl stuff like armour, weapons, potions, spells and so forth. Whatever items your "party" finds and hauls out to the exit provide corresponding cards for use in the subsequent game round.

EDIT: OT, but I wouldn't really consider Iron Chef a reality show. It's just a televised contest. This type of show pre-dates the whole "reality TV" thing. Furthermore, if a cooking contest is reality TV, then what about a baseball game?

Baseball is sports and infinitely better than reality tv. Many reality tv shows are just new dumb sports for people who don't like real sports. American idol / bachelor you are picking a team and hoping they win the contest


I respectfully disagree. While some reality shows are like sports, the reason I provided cooking competition shows as an example is they have an appeal to viewers in that the dishes cooked up are very appetizing and you want to eat it. The appeal of a boardgame design show will be producing games that you really want to play. We geeks are very impressed by pictures of new games. I think seeing some average Joe's design transformed by the art of a fan favorite like Michael Menzel or Maura Kaulsky, then playtested and judged by the likes of Martin Wallace and Bruno Faudutti will be very fun to watch.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brandon Bernard
United States
Lansdale
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
riddlen wrote:
I do not think hours of doodling and playtesting and math would make a good show.


But apparently people think hours of doodling and cutting fabric does. (Project Runway)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wim van Gruisen
Netherlands
Den Bosch
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmb
Jexik wrote:
"I haf in meine hand only three meeples, but four peoples in front of me. Vun of you vill be leafing the island of Catan, cubes in hand."

Yeah, this is a bad idea. Even in Germany I doubt anyone would watch anything.

Board game design is not visually stimulating enough to translate well to TV. If anything tangentially related to board games would make even an okay show, I think it'd be something more like America's Next Top Illustrator.

I'm just trying to find a reason why German game designers on a German TV show would try to speak English. And if they do, why they'd find a game show host whose command of the language and accent is so dreadful.


I agree that a TV show would be boring. But I could see the concept work in a monthly magazine. Games would do much better in a print medium than on TV.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andreas Pelikan
Austria
Vienna
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
ralpher wrote:
It might work in Germany...


In Germany, there's a guaranteed viewer base of 10 to 20k board game enthusiasts. But beyond that, who'd want to watch game design in the works? For the show to be considered by one of the nation-wide broadcasting companies, it would have to catch ALL of the app. 300k Spiel des Jahres buyers. But even then it would be too weak for prime-time (requiring 1-5m viewers). So it would need to attract non-gamers as well. Anticlimactic side note: even the prestigious Spiel des Jahres award ceremony is newsworthy only to the local broadcasting company, but not to the nation-wide broadcasters.

In the mid-noughties there were two tv-show formats in German tv where celebrities played board games on stage.

In Promi ärgere dich nicht (Prominenter=celebrity), B-grade celebrities were playing Mensch ärgere dich nicht (pachisi) on a giant board with C-grade celebrities as playing pieces. The show was perfect for underminingpinning (edit: weird typo, sorry) the believe held by many non-gamers that games = kids stuff. While roll&move creates some suspense if you're personally involved, watching others rolling dice without big incentives to support a particular faction is, let's say "not quite so much of a thrill". There was some comic relief: when a playing piece was captured (called schlagen, literally: to beat), both "pieces" would stage a brawl. And there were a few (too few) special spaces where the player landing on them could fight for an extra turn in a typical game-show challenge. Four shows were being broadcast from 2005 to 2008, three of them during the Christmas holiday season. I watched two of them with curiosity and disappointment. The hosts and the players made the show acceptable, though.

IMHO a lot more fun was Extreme Activity, where more or less well known tv faces were playing Activity with slightly modified rules (explain/draw/act as many words as possible within a set time limit) and a new category "extreme", i.e. do the same with some sort of handicap (see above link). I guess Piatnik did sponsor the show, as copies of Activity, and later Extreme Activity were handed out at the end. The weekly show started out in July 2006 as a Saturday prime time filler during the low summer season, but was continued in fall due to its popularity among viewers. The last show in summer had "only 1.6m viewers", and in fall it went from weekly to irregular periods. In December it went back to weekly but moved from Saturday to Tuesday, later to Monday. The last show was produced in March 2007. If it had been a monthly or quarterly show initially, I guess it could still be alive in the Saturday prime-time slot. The show was almost as much fun as playing Activity yourself, plus shy people could enjoy it without needing to act themselves (and see that it's not that bad to make a fool of yourself). If Pädn was driving potential players away, EA was a great gateway show.

Now back on topic:
how can a game designer show attract non-gamers?

Iron chef? Everybody likes fine dining. Can't compete with that.

X-Factor? Everybody wants to be a rock star. Can't compete with that.

Project runway? Everybody likes fashion/fashion models (choose option based on gender). Can't compete with that.

Who wants to be a millionaire? Err, everybody. Can't compete with that.

Color splash? Everybody wants a lovely living room. Can't compete with David, either.

Big Brother? Nobody wants to watch lazy young adults doing nothing all day except occasionally exposing their buttocks in the shower. Yet the show goes into its 12th season. Here we go: Track game designers and illustrators 24/7 as they create 7 Wonders, European edition.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sam Phillips Beckerman
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Several things made TV Poker so popular:

the card cam which reveals each players hidden cards.

the editing-film it all, show the beginning, the interesting, & the end.

the commentary, like the Olympics, this makes the casual view soon feel like he is qualified to judge the difference between an 8 and a 7. It also helps explain some of the principles and the lingo.

Totally do-able, only change would be the cams would have to be customized for each game. Seems like the manufacturers would totally sponsor the show their game is featured on.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.