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Subject: iOS Chess App That Teaches Strategy? rss

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Matt Sommer
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Anyone know of any chess apps available for the iPhone that actually TEACH strategy?

I have always wanted to learn how to play chess well, but I've never been able to grasp even the fundamentals (other than how the pieces move). I generally tend to just flail my pieces wildly onto the board and hope for the best. Naturally, this strategy results in me being beaten nearly every time I play, and naturally this causes me to really never play.

Would appreciate any hints or advice. Does such a thing exist on iOS?

 
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p55carroll
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I don't know about iOS, but it exists elsewhere. Chessmaster 9000 is a decent example, and there's a version of CM for the Nintendo DS that works reasonably well.

If you find a good iOS chess app, your best bet might be to get a good book on chess as well. I recommend Play Winning Chess. There are lots of other good beginner books that will get you oriented and playing intelligently.

If you'd rather poke around online, you'll no doubt turn up some good chess tutorials. I just found this one via a Google search.
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Todd Redden
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I don't know about chess teachers for iOS but there are a number of good apps, including tChess Pro (great for replaying games stored as pgn) and Opening Pro (great for studying opening book) and Fritz Chess and Shredder Chess. As a beginner your best steps towards improvement are to spend some time with endgame study (get to know the strengths and weaknesses of all the pieces) then look at one or two openings. This can be done with any of the suggested iOS apps above which enable board set ups.

The one change that improved my play the most was when I began to understand the meaning of tempo and to play to stay ahead of my opponent in time. That means not moving the same piece twice in the opening (control more squares and control the center), not always jumping on every available capture (sometimes it is much more important to improve position than to put all your energy into trying to capture a piece), making moves that accomplish more than one thing at a time, and making moves that force your opponent to reply immediately, wasting their time and taking their eye off of their own goals. Studying combinations with a good book of chess puzzles or positional analysis is also very good for improvement.

My recommendation for beginners is always the same: Find people to play with, either on-line or in a club. Stick with players of similar level, and always set computer opponents at or closely above your current level. Study endgames, combinations and one or two favorite opening systems (that only requires the purchase of 3 books at most.) Chess is a fight! There is no reason at all to continue playing chess haphazardly.
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Matt Sommer
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tChess included an "ebook" introduction, and I'm going through that right now. Don't think it's going to be too helpful, though.

I appreciate the help, but the comments like the one above make me want to put all of this stuff away It's just too damn complicated.

 
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Todd Redden
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SommerMatt wrote:
tChess included an "ebook" introduction, and I'm going through that right now. Don't think it's going to be too helpful, though.

I appreciate the help, but the comments like the one above make me want to put all of this stuff away It's just too damn complicated.


Yes, obviously chess is complicated. More books have been written about chess than any other single topic in human history (there are several libraries in the world with nothing but chess books). If you lack the mindset for complex games then chess may not be the one for you. Still, as long as you abide by my advice and stick to players of your relative level, it is such a great game and you can gradually improve over whatever time frame you want.
 
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V. Romero
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Shredder iOS is pretty good. I started using it while just knowing the moves, but now I'm pretty decent.
It doesn't coach you step by step, but it does coach you in that it raises and lowers its level by each game, and tells you when you don't make a good move. There's also a hint option to see what move you should make if you're stuck.

Try the free version by downloading it for the iOS or computer (download or Google Chrome app), and see if you like it enough to buy the full version.
 
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SommerMatt wrote:

Anyone know of any chess apps available for the iPhone that actually TEACH strategy?

I have always wanted to learn how to play chess well, but I've never been able to grasp even the fundamentals (other than how the pieces move). I generally tend to just flail my pieces wildly onto the board and hope for the best. Naturally, this strategy results in me being beaten nearly every time I play, and naturally this causes me to really never play.

Would appreciate any hints or advice. Does such a thing exist on iOS?



Ok, since apparently you are a rank beginner looking for direction, I can point you to one person who has had great success. Jeremy Silman. But you'll have to do it the old fashioned way as his stuff is only in print.

He has several books that are targeted at you right between the eyes. If you don't improve after reading and applying his methods then stick to to playing one of those fru-fru Euro games you so covet.

So, I'd go with #1: How to ReAssess your chess.

That book has turned many hack chess players into reasonable mediocre chess players, for sure.

p.s.: It's not strategy you lack but an understanding of the fundamentals of the game. Strategy only comes once you grasp the fundamentals of the game on a whole. Start there.
 
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Djum Mikhail
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I venture to suggest a great solution chess book of problems.
Mate in1
https://itunes.apple.com/ru/app/mate-in-2-ok!-v.1/id59212889...
 
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